Innovation in Publishing

Elsevier’s new open access journal Heliyon is now accepting submissions

Authors will benefit from swift publication times, a simple submission process, and discoverability of their papers

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In a previous Authors’ Update article, we introduced you to Heliyon – Elsevier’s new open access journal which will publish sound research across all disciplines. Now Heliyon is officially accepting submissions and we would like to invite you to send us your manuscript. We expect the first papers to be published later this year. 

We have also launched heliyon.com, a website containing everything from author guidelines to our open access policies and editorial board members. The website is also the entry portal to the EVISE® submission system (the successor to our current Elsevier Editorial System – EES).

You might wonder what sets Heliyon apart from other open access journals with broad scopes. Authors who publish their content in Heliyon can expect the following:

Heliyon – the facts

  • Once an article is accepted, Heliyon aims to publish it online within 72 hours
  • The article publishing charge is $1,250, plus VAT or local taxes where applicable
  • You can choose between two Creative Commons licenses: CC-BY and CC-BY-NC-ND
  • A new, simple interface for the submission system will be launched later this year

Fast publication

The author experience starts with the submission process. Our developers are currently working on a new, simple interface for the submission system that will be launched later this year.  Our efficient editors, who specialize in a broad range of fields, will then match each manuscript to the right expert reviewers, and will work to get a decision quickly. Once an article is accepted, Heliyon aims to publish it online within 72 hours.

Open access

Heliyon is a fully open access journal. As such, readers will have immediate and permanent access to all articles. As an author, you can choose between two Creative Commons licenses - CC-BY and CC-BY-NC-ND – so you can pick the one best suited to your specific needs. For more information on the licenses, our article publishing charge ($1,250, plus VAT or local taxes where applicable), and other open access information, visit heliyon.com

Discoverability

Even though Heliyon will publish content across all research fields, papers will not get lost in the vastness of the journal’s scope. The Heliyon team wants to help you make the biggest splash possible. With access to Elsevier’s cutting-edge technologies and popular platforms like Mendeley and ScienceDirect, Heliyon will ensure papers are targeted to the relevant readers and can easily be found by anyone interested in your research.

The opportunity to shape Heliyon’s future

One of Heliyon’s main goals is to experiment and innovate in areas such as content display, peer-review processes, and author services. Lessons learnt through this testing will then be evaluated for potential roll out to other Elsevier journals. Upon announcing the journal earlier this year, we invited the research community to collaborate with us on these developments. As the journal continues to develop in the upcoming months, we will be asking researchers for their feedback on new features and platforms.

If you have any ideas about how to improve the publication process, please email us at info@heliyon.com.

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Author biography

Mary Beth O'LearyMary Beth O’Leary is Marketing and Publicity Manager for Heliyon, based in London. Prior to moving to London, she lived in Boston where she joined Elsevier in August 2009. For over five years she worked for Cell Press in various roles across editorial, marketing, and public relations. Most recently she acted as Media Relations Manager for Cell Press’ 30 titles. A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, she studied literature and art history.

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