Mapping research and Innovation: Understanding Amsterdam's Competitive Advantage

A report by the Urban Innovation Network and Elsevier

Elsevier Analytical Services and the Urban Innovation Network partnered on this report to examine how cities can align development strategies and priorities with research strengths. Using Amsterdam as a case study, the report analyzes the city's competitiveness across multiple dimensions of research performance from 2004-2013. The report benchmarks Amsterdam against ten other European cities of comparable size and standing, namely: Barcelona, Berlin, Brussels, Copenhagen, Dublin, Hamburg, Madrid, Manchester, Stockholm and Vienna.

To generate this report, Elsevier’s Analytical Services identified and aggregated research performance data for institutions in Amsterdam and comparator cities. The report draws on a variety of data sources including Scopus, usage metrics from ScienceDirect R&D expenditure, employment, and population data from EuroStat and the OIS (Research, Information and Statistics) of the City of Amsterdam, and patent information from the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and LexisNexis TotalPatent.

NOTE: Methods appendix to this report will be uploaded soon

The core findings

  1. Amsterdam has key strengths in medicine
    • Among the eleven cities under comparison, Amsterdam ranked first and second respectively in terms of relative volume and impact of medical research. The city’s research community has produced over 3,600 publications over the past 10 years in oncology, and Amsterdam's relative research impact in clinical neurology is more than twice the world average.
      Radar pie graph of Amsterdam's publications by subject area, where absolute publication volume corresponds to size of the pice slices, field-weighted citation impact corresponds to color, and relative publication volume corresponds to the height of the pie slice, from 2004 to 2013. Source: Publication data from Scopus
      Figure 2.1 - Radar pie graph of Amsterdam's publications by subject area, where absolute publication volume corresponds to size of the pice slices, field-weighted citation impact corresponds to color, and relative publication volume corresponds to the height of the pie slice, from 2004 to 2013. Source: Publication data from Scopus®
      Scatterplot of total publications versus field-weighted citation impact of Amsterdam's publications by sub-areas within medicine, from 2004 to 2013. Source: Publication data from Scopus
      Figure 2.2 - Scatterplot of total publications versus field-weighted citation impact of Amsterdam's publications by sub-areas within medicine, from 2004 to 2013. Source: Publication data from Scopus®
  2. Amsterdam is strongly connected to industry through its research.
    • Amsterdam’s research in immunology and microbiology is incorporated in patents at a rate of six times above the world average.
      Proportion of total publications that are academic-corporate collaborations versus relative academic patent citation share for Amsterdan by subject area, from 2004 to 2013. Source: Publication data from Scopus and Patent Data from Lexis-Nexis
      Figure 3.3 - Proportion of total publications that are academic-corporate collaborations versus relative academic patent citation share for Amsterdan by subject area, from 2004 to 2013. Source: Publication data from Scopus® and Patent Data from Lexis-Nexis®
    • Amsterdam’s universities should continue to grow strong connections, especially with pharmaceutical companies. 
      Network graph of top corporate collaborators for Amsterdam and ten other European Cities, from 2004 to 2013. Source: Publication data from Scopus
      Figure 3.4 - Network graph of top corporate collaborators for Amsterdam and ten other European Cities, from 2004 to 2013. Source: Publication data from Scopus®

      Circle size refers to number of publications, line thickness refers to number of collaborations between entities; grayscale color (for either circle or line) refers to field-weighted citation impact of publications associated with that entity or collaboration, with darkers colors associated with higher field-weighted citation impacts. Amsterdam and its collaborations are colored orange; pharmaceutical companies have blue labels.
  3. Amsterdam’s researchers are globally connected.
    • Between 2004 and 2013, Amsterdam researchers co-authored more than 100 publications with researchers from 66 different countries.
       Map displaying co-authored publications between Amsterdam and other countires, from 2004 to 2013. The width of the lines between Amsterdam and the countries indicate the relative density of co-authored publications, which is directly proportional to the absolute number of co-authored publications and inversely proportional to the total number of publications by each entity.Source: Publication data from Scopus
      Figure 4.4 - Map displaying co-authored publications between Amsterdam and other countires, from 2004 to 2013. The width of the lines between Amsterdam and the countries indicate the relative density of co-authored publications, which is directly proportional to the absolute number of co-authored publications and inversely proportional to the total number of publications by each entity.Source: Publication data from Scopus®

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