CRISPR

Does it spell the end of cancer, HIV and other gene mutating diseases?

CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat) is a powerful gene-editing methodology which provides an efficient, cost-effective and reliable process for making precise, targeted changes to the genome of living cells.

Using 2011-2015 data from Scopus and analyzed in SciVal, we examined the current landscape relating to genome mutations and gene-editing methods, which countries have the most prolific researchers and the  concentration of  publications on CRISPR relating to diseases such as HIV, cancer and hepatitis.

Could further developments relating to CRISPR-Cas9 technology lead to the eradication of all gene-mutating diseases?

Gene Editing Research

Four main nucleases are used for genome editing: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), Transcription activator-like effector based nucleases (TALEN), meganucleases, and the CRISP-Cas9 system. Due to its efficiency and cost effective nature,
CRISPR is by far the most popular method.

Gene Editing

PUBLICATIONS (2011-2015)

The number of publications pertaining to CRISPR has risen dramatically. In 2015, the number of articles related to CRISPR (1185) almost tripled compared with the combined growth rate in publication output for the other three methods (397).

The graph highlights the rapid rise in CRISPR publications in a few short years.

Publication

ACADEMIC-CORPORATE COLLABORATION

ACADEMIC-CORPORATE COLLABORATION (2011-2015)

CRISPR papers co-published by authors from both academic and corporate institutions produced, on average, much higher citations than those published by academic authors only.

Of the 38 publications co-authored with the private sector, the average citation per paper was 95.3; this compared with the average of 26.5 citations per paper for publications with no corporate collaboration.

CRISPR Research Output, Impact and Excellence
(2011-2015)

CRISPR Research Output, Impact and Excellence

FIELD - WEIGHTED CITATION IMPACT

On average, CRISPR publications receive almost five times more citations (FWCI of 4.8) than the global average of publications in the same field.

WEIGHTED CITATION IMPACT

OUTPUTS IN TOP CITATION PERCENTILES

OUTPUTS IN TOP CITATION PERCENTILES

Over half (56.1%) of all CRISPR publications are in the top 10% most-cited publications and more than one-in-five are in the top 1% most-cited publications.

OUTSTANDING RESEARCHERS

Jennifer Doudna and her partner Emmanuelle Charpentier are the researchers behind the development of CRISPR-Cas9, the recent major breakthrough in gene editing biotechnology.

OUTSTANDING RESEARCHERS - 1

OUTSTANDING RESEARCHERS - 2

From 2011-2015, Jennifer published 83 papers, 40 of which relating to CRISPR-Cas9, and has received an average of 117.1 citations per publication. During the same time, Emmanuelle published 29 papers receiving an average of 162.9 citations per publication.

For their discovery, the two researchers were awarded the prestigious Breakthrough Prize in life sciences 2015

Country Output on CRISPR
(2011-2015)

Country Output on CRISPR

SCHOLARLY OUTPUT PER YEAR

CRISPR KEYPHRASES

CRISPR and Disease

The ability to easily modify and edit genes might hold the key to finding cures for a number of diseases. CRISPR research on specific diseases has increased in the past year, especially relating to Cancer, HIV, and Hepatitis.

CRISPR and Disease

Number of publications

All data taken from SciVal – 10 December 2016 (Scopus® data up to 12 November 2016) and includes all publication type (articles, papers, surveys, reviews, editorials, etc.).

About SciVal: SciVal offers quick, easy access to the research performance of 7,500 research institutions and 220 countries worldwide.

About Scopus: Scopus® is the world’s leading abstract and citation database, and is used by institutions and governments, as well as for university rankings around the world.