Maternal Depression And Controlling Behavior Are Associated With Increased Stress Response In Infants

 New study published in Biological Psychiatry

Philadelphia, PA, September 18, 2007 – Teenage pregnancy is widely recognized to be a major public health concern. These young mothers face many life challenges and they have an increased risk for becoming depressed. How might the behavior of these young mothers be related to later psychiatric or behavioral problems in some of their offspring? A new study being published in Biological Psychiatry on September 15th suggests an association between a history of depression in the mothers, a particular style of mothering, "maternal overcontrol", and increased stress reactivity of their infants.

Azar and colleagues measured the cortisol levels of infants both before and after a brief mild stressor. They found that a lifetime history of major depression in the mother and a maternal pattern of intrusive and overstimulating behavior toward their infant ("maternal overcontrol") were associated with an increased release of the stress hormone, cortisol, in the infants following the mild stress exposure. The infants of mothers with a history of depression had also had lower pre-stress cortisol levels. Also, there was a correlation in the cortisol levels between mothers and their infants.

These findings add "to our small but growing body of knowledge on neurobiological differences in stress responses between infants of depressed and non-depressed mothers", noted Dr. Azar. John H. Krystal, M.D., Editor of Biological Psychiatry and affiliated with both Yale University School of Medicine and the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, adds, "Teenage mothers and their offspring are both, in their own ways, vulnerable. As a result, teenage pregnancy is thought to be a setting for preventative educational programs that might help teenagers better cope with their upcoming challenges." He also points out that, "We do not yet know the long-term consequences of maternal 'overcontrol', but should it prove to have negative long-term effects, it is conceivable that this type of behavior might be targeted in preventive educational programs."

Dr. Azar concludes, "Practically, the open question is that of the long-term effects: are these infants at increased risk for psychological or physical stress-related illnesses later in life. If so, why? Given that the adrenocortical system is known to be plastic and hence easily influenced in both positive and negative ways, we believe that it is very important to eventually identify which of these babies are more vulnerable to stress."

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Notes to Editors:
The article is "The Association of Major Depression, Conduct Disorder, and Maternal Overcontrol with a Failure to Show a Cortisol Buffered Response in 4-Month-Old Infants of Teenage Mothers" by Rima Azar, Daniel Paquette, Mark Zoccolillo, Franziska Baltzer and Richard E. Tremblay. Dr. Azar is affiliated with the University Health Network, Women’s Health Program, Toronto General Hospital in affiliation with the University of Toronto in Ontario, Canada. Dr. Paquette is with the Department of Psychology at the University of Montreal and the Research Institute for the Social Development of Youth (RISD)-Montreal Youth Center in Quebec, Canada. Dr. Zoccolillo is with the Department of Psychiatry, while Dr. Baltzer is with the Department of Pediatrics, both at McGill University & McGill University Health Centre-Montreal Children’s Hospital in Quebec, Canada. Dr. Tremblay is affiliated with the Research Unit on Children's Psychosocial Maladjustment at the University of Montreal. This article appears in Biological Psychiatry, Volume 62, Issue 6 (September 15, 2007), published by Elsevier.

Full text of the article mentioned above is available upon request. Contact Jayne M. Dawkins at (215) 239-3674 or to obtain a copy or to schedule an interview.

About Biological Psychiatry
This international rapid-publication journal is the official journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry. It covers a broad range of topics in psychiatric neuroscience and therapeutics. Both basic and clinical contributions are encouraged from all disciplines and research areas relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of major neuropsychiatric disorders. Full-length and Brief Reports of novel results, Commentaries, Case Studies of unusual significance, and Correspondence and Comments judged to be of high impact to the field are published, particularly those addressing genetic and environmental risk factors, neural circuitry and neurochemistry, and important new therapeutic approaches. Concise Reviews and Editorials that focus on topics of current research and interest are also published rapidly.

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