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Proximal Phalanges of Hand (Left)
Skeletal System

Proximal Phalanges of Hand (Left)

Phalanges proximales manus

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Description

The proximal phalanges of the hand are one of the three rows of bones of the digits, the other two being the middle and distal phalanges. There are five proximal phalanges of the hand, each classified as a long bone, which form the proximal segments of each digit. They are located distal to the metacarpal bones, and proximal to the distal phalanx of the thumb and the middle phalanges of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers.

Overall, the proximal phalanges are the largest and longest of the phalanges in the hand, the distal phalanges are the smallest and shortest, and the middle phalanges are intermediate in size. The proximal and middle phalanges share a similar morphology, while the distal phalanges are quite different in appearance.

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Proximal Phalanx

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Based on the second proximal phalanx, it was possible to make a further comparison between the antemortem radiograph and the postmortem material, specifically an X-ray and a photograph of the bone.

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