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Infrapatellar Branch of Saphenous Nerve (Right)
Nervous System

Infrapatellar Branch of Saphenous Nerve (Right)

Ramus infrapatellaris nervi sapheni

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Origin

As the saphenous nerve exits from the adductor (or subsartorial) canal, it gives off an infrapatellar branch.

Course

The infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve pierces the fascia lata to become cutaneous. It runs superficially in an arc-like course between the apex of the patella cranially and the tibial tubercle caudally.

Branches

There are no named branches, however, the infrapatellar branch of saphenous nerve ends in the form of two superior and inferior terminal branches which unite with the following branches to form a peripatellar plexus of nerves:

—anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve;

—medial crural branches of the saphenous nerve (below the knee);

—lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (on the lateral border of the patellar ligament).

Supplied Structures

The infrapatellar branch of saphenous nerve is a purely sensory nerve that innervates the anteromedial aspect of the knee, from the lower patella to the upper anterior portion of the leg, as well as the anteroinferior part of the knee joint capsule.

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Saphenous Nerve

ScienceDirect image

Saphenous nerve entrapment—The saphenous nerve is a cutaneous nerve that can become entrapped in the distal thigh as it passes through the adductor canal.

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