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Superior Cerebellar Peduncle (Anterior; Right)
Nervous System

Superior Cerebellar Peduncle (Anterior; Right)

Pedunculus cerebellaris superior

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Quick Facts

The superior cerebellar peduncle (aka rostral cerebellar peduncle, or brachium conjunctivum) consists of a large bundle of nerve fibers emerges from the cerebellum along the lateral wall of the fourth ventricle into the tegmentum where most of its fibers decussate.

The fibers originate from the dentate and interpositus nuclei. They terminate in the contralateral red nucleus and parts of the ventrolateral, ventral intermediate and central lateral nuclei of the thalamus.

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Superior Cerebellar Peduncle

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The superior cerebellar peduncle is the principal efferent pathway of axons leaving the globose, emboliform, and dentate nuclei (the intermediate and lateral nuclei), and also carries afferents into the cerebellum from the ventral spinocerebellar tract, the tectocerebellar tract, the rubrocerebellar tract, and the noradrenergic projections from the locus coeruleus.

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