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Sigmoid Sinus
Cardiovascular System

Sigmoid Sinus

Sinus sigmoideus

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Quick Facts

Origin: Transverse sinus.

Course: Runs towards the superior jugular bulb of the internal jugular vein inside the jugular foramen.

Tributaries: Mastoid and condylar emissary veins, cerebral, inferior cerebellar and diploic veins, superior petrosal sinus.

Drainage: From the posterior dural venous sinuses (draining posterior aspect of the skull).

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Origin

The sigmoid sinuses are continuations of the transverse sinuses, beginning where these leave the tentorium cerebellum.

Course

Each sigmoid sinus curves inferomedially in an S-shaped groove on the mastoid process of the temporal bone. It crosses the jugular process of the occipital bone and turns forwards to end in the superior jugular bulb, lying in the posterior half of the jugular foramen.

Tributaries

The sigmoid sinus receives the mastoid and condylar emissary veins. It also receives blood from the cerebral, cerebellar, and diploic veins.

The superior petrosal sinus joins the sigmoid sinus at its junction with the transverse sinus. Inferiorly, the sigmoid sinus combines with the inferior petrosal sinus to the form the internal jugular vein.

Structures Drained

The sigmoid sinus receives blood from the transverse sinus, which receives blood from the posterior dural venous sinuses that drain the posterior aspect of the skull.

Learn more about this topic from other Elsevier products

Sigmoid Sinus

ScienceDirect image

A sigmoid sinus wall dehiscence is a defect of the mastoid part of the temporal bone at the area covering the sigmoid sinus, in which the mastoid cells enclose and constrict the sinus.

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