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Popliteal Vein
Cardiovascular System

Popliteal Vein

Vena poplitea

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Quick Facts

Origin: Union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins.

Course: Ascends in the popliteal fossa and becomes the femoral vein at the opening of the adductor magnus muscle.

Tributaries: Small saphenous, genicular, and sural veins.

Drainage: Knee, leg, ankle, and foot.

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Origin

The popliteal vein arises by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins at the distal border of the popliteus muscle.

Course

The popliteal vein ascends in the popliteal fossa, accompanied by the popliteal artery. It is usually more superficial to the artery, but in some cases, it may pass deep to the artery. The popliteal vein becomes the femoral vein as it passes through the adductor hiatus.

Tributaries

The popliteal vein receives the small saphenous, genicular, and sural veins.

Structures Drained

The popliteal vein receives blood from the deep veins coming from the knee, leg, ankle, and foot.

List of Clinical Correlates

- Deep vein thrombosis

Learn more about this topic from other Elsevier products

Popliteal Vein

ScienceDirect image

Elevation of the popliteal vein pressure persists long after cessation of active muscle contraction (see Figure 62.3).

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