Global Award

Introducing the award

The Bellman Prize is awarded every two years for the best paper published in Mathematical Biosciences over the preceding two years. The Prize includes a check for $1250 and an announcement in Mathematical Biosciences, with a summary of the research and information about the authors. The Bellman Prize was established in 1985 in honor and memory of Dr. Richard Bellman, a true pioneer in biomathematics and the founder of the journal Mathematical Biosciences. An independent selection committee chosen by the editor and associate editors awards this prize.


The fourteenth Bellman Prize, 2013

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025556411000101

A general approach for population games with application to vaccination
Timothy C. Reluga and Alison P. Galvani

Mathematical Biosciences230 (2), pp. 67–78, 2011

The thirteenth Bellman Prize, 2011

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025556411001568

Size distribution dependence of prion aggregates infectivity
Vincent Calvez, Natacha Lenuzza, Dietmar Oelz, Jean-Philippe Deslys, Pascal Laurent, Franck Mouthon, and Benoit Perthame

Mathematical Biosciences217 (1), pp. 88–99, 2009

The twelfth Bellman Prize, 2009

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002555640900131X

Mathematical modeling of cancer radiovirotherapy
David Dingli, Matthew D. Cascino, Krešimir Josic ́, Stephen J. Russell, and Zeljko Bajzer of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN and the University of Houston, TX

Mathematical Biosciences199, 55–78, 2006

The eleventh Bellman Prize, 2007

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025556407002209

A physiological model of cerebral blood flow control
M. Banaji, I. Tachtsidis, D. Delpy, and S. Baigent

Mathematical Biosciences194(2):125–73, 2005

The tenth Bellman Prize, 2005

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025556402001086

Reproduction numbers and sub-threshold endemic equilibria for compartmental models of disease transmission

Pauline van den Driessche and James Watmough

Mathematical Biosciences180 (1-2) (2002) 29

The ninth Bellman Prize, 2003

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025556403001147

Metabolic isotopomer labeling systems. Part I: global dynamic behavior
Wolfgang Wiechert and Michael Wurzel

Mathematical Biosciences169 (2) (2001) 173

The eighth Bellman Prize, 2002

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025556402001219

A model of microbial growth in a plug flow reactor with wall attachment
M. Ballyk, H.L. Smith

Mathematical Biosciences158 (2) (1999) 95

The seventh Bellman Prize, 2001

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0025556495000534

The intrinsic rate of increase of HIV/AIDS: Epidemiological and evolutionary implications.

Levin, B.R., J.J. Bull, and F.M. Stewart.

Mathematical Biosciences132:69-96.

The sixth Bellman Prize, 1999

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/002555649490040X

Mathematical modeling of corneal epithelial wound healing

Paul Dale and Philip Maini

Mathematical Biosciences124 (2) (1994) 127

The fifth Bellman Prize, 1997

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0025556497900274

Mathematical Modeling of T-Cell Proliferation
I.A. Sidorov and A.A. Romanyukha

Mathematical Biosciences115:187- 32, 1993

The fourth Bellman Prize, 1994

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0025556494900027

Geometric optical investigation of the underwater field of aerial animals
G. Horvath and D. Varju

Mathematical Biosciences102:1-19, 1990


Runner-up:

Mathematical modeling of the excitation process in myocardial tissue: influence of fiber rotation on wave front propagation and potential field
P. Colli Franzone, L. Guerri, and S. Tentoni

Mathematical Biosciences 101:155-235, 1990

The third Bellman Prize, 1991

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/002555649190068T

Complex oscillations in the human pupil light reflex with "mixed" and delayed feedback
A. Longtin and J. G. Milton

Mathematical Biosciences90:183-199, 1988


Runner-up:

A mathematical model for the vulnerable phase in myocardium
J. P. Keener

Mathematical Biosciences90:3-18, 1988

The second Bellman Prize, 1989

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0025556489900631

A stochastic model of cell division
W. Alt and J. J. Tyson

Mathematical Biosciences84:159-187 (1987)


Runner-up:

Subcellular oscillations and bursting
N. Kopell and G. B. Ermentrout

Mathematical Biosciences78:265-291 (1986)


The first Bellman Prize, 1987

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0025556487901180

A Mathematical Procedure for Solving the Inverse Potential Problem of Electrocardiography. Analysis of the Time- Space Accuracy from in Vitro Experimental Data
P. Colli-Franzone, L. Guerri, S. Tentoni, C. Viganotti, S. Baruffi, S. Spaggiari, and B. Taccardi

Mathematical Biosciences771:353-396 (1985)

Inoculation and Recovery Rates in the Malaria Model of Dietz, Molineaux, and Thomas
J. R. Nedelman

Mathematical Biosciences69:209-233 (1984)


Runners-up:

Optimal Foraging in Nonpatchy Habitats. I. Bounded One-Dimensional Resource
R. Arditi and B. Dacorogna

Mathematical Biosciences76:127-145 (1985)

The Gamma Distribution and Weighted Multimodal Gamma Distributions as Models of Population Abundance
B. Dermis and G. P. Patil

Mathematical Biosciences68:187-212 (1984)

Optimal Harvesting with Exponential Growth in an Environment with Random Disasters and Bonanzas
D. Ryan and F. B. Hanson

Mathematical Biosciences74:37-57 (1985)

1.) Criteria & selection process

The Editor-in-Chief receives a list of the top cited articles (in year X) published in year X-3 and X-2. So for the year 2011, the award was for papers published in 2008-2009. The Editor-in-Chief then selects a Bellman Prize committee of six or seven people, representing diverse interests, nationalities, and many other criteria. They receive the following instructions:

The author(s) to be selected must have published a Mathematical Biosciences paper in X-3 or X-2. Papers (co-)authored by members of the editorial board are ineligible. If an author has received the Bellman award before, s/he is eligible again. We have identified the 20 papers with the top numbers of citations. The list is attached again. You are free to add to this list papers that you really like. If so, please do it early so that others can consider them as well. The top 20 list contains a couple of reviews. If any of these are terrific, they are eligible and should be considered. However, if you consider citation numbers as a criterion, please take into account that reviews often receive more citations than other papers.

Please select 4 or 5 favorites and rank them (1 best, 5 least of the most favorable), while ignoring everything lower than 5. If you could send me your ranking by August 15, it would be good. If you need more time, let me know (if you have not done so already). Upon receiving your rankings, I will collate the results. If a clear winner emerges, you are all done. If not, we will have additional email discussions.

I hope these ground rules are acceptable and that you gain enlightenment and/or fun reading some of these papers

2.) Contact

The process of nomination is internal and not advertised; an author cannot apply for the prize.

$1250, plus announcement in Mathematical Biosciences, with summary of the article

The Bellman Prize is awarded every two years for the best paper published in Mathematical Biosciences over the preceding two years. All articles published in the journal are eligible for the Prize, which includes a check for $1250 and an announcement in Mathematical Biosciences, with a summary of the research and information about the authors. The Bellman Prize was established in 1985 in honor and memory of Dr. Richard Bellman, a true pioneer in biomathematics and the founder of the journal Mathematical Biosciences. An independent selection committee chosen by the editor and associate editors awards this prize.

In the 1940s and 1950s, Richard Bellman (1920–1984) developed the method of dynamic programming, which subdivides the task of optimizing a complex problem dynamically into solutions of smaller sub-problems that are easier to manage. At the time, dynamic programming offered an efficiency never seen before, and by now it has become a standard technique in applied mathematics and computer science. Bellman also coined the term curse of dimensionality, which continues to be a particular challenge for the mathematical analysis of many biological systems. Later, Bellman devoted his talents to mathematical analyses in biology and medicine and founded the journal Mathematical Biosciences. In his honor, the Bellman Prize was established shortly after Richard Bellman's death.