Penn State and NAGP identify and reconstitute two lost Holstein lines

Research in the Journal of Dairy Science® highlights effort to increase genetic diversity of dairy cattle


Philadelphia, May 11, 2020

Artificial insemination (AI), breeding value estimation, and genomic selection have allowed substantial increases in milk and component yields for Holstein cows. However, their widespread use has also led to challenges including declining fertility, emergence of recessive genetic conditions, and a loss of genetic diversity—more than 99 percent of Holstein bulls born using AI in the last decade trace their male lineage to just two bulls born in the 1960s. Efforts to reconstitute two lost male lineages are reported in a recent article by scientists from the Pennsylvania State University Department of Animal Science and the National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP), in the Journal of Dairy Science, published by Elsevier and FASS Inc .

“Introgression of genetic diversity from such lineages into modern Holsteins is a long-term prospect with no guarantee of success,” Dr. Chad Dechow said. “Nevertheless, these lines demonstrate the possibility of using semen from the 1950s to reintroduce lost genetic variation.” Because the Y chromosome is passed only through males, these reconstituted lines will allow expanded research into Y-chromosome variation and function.

Two lines were identified for reconstitution from semen samples in the NAGP repository. The Netherland Prince line shares no known common male ancestors with the two most common Holstein lines; the Colantha line does not share a common male ancestor after the 1890s. Six calves were born to the Colantha lineage, and nine calves were born to the Netherland Prince lineage at the Penn State Dairy Production Research and Teaching Facility. One generation of mating the lost lineage bulls to elite modern females was sufficient to update the lost lineages to near breed average for most traits.

Picture of Netherland Prince from the Holstein Herd-Book
Picture of Netherland Prince from the Holstein Herd-Book, Vol. 8, 1885 (Holstein Breeders Association of America, 1885).

The breadth of the US Holstein germplasm collection facilitated the introgression of the lost Y chromosomes. Only time will tell whether the collection will have the same utility for yet-unknown issues that emerge.

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Notes for editors
The article is “Reconstitution and modernization of lost Holstein male lineages using samples from a gene bank,” by C.D. Dechow, W.S. Liu, L.W. Specht, and H. Blackburn (https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2019-17753). It appears in the Journal of Dairy Science, volume 103, issue 5 (May 2020), published by FASS Inc. and Elsevier.

Full text of the articles is available to credentialed journalists upon request. Contact Eileen Leahy at +1 732 238 3628 or jdsmedia@elsevier.com to obtain copies. Journalists wishing to interview any of the authors of the papers should contact the corresponding author at cdd1@psu.edu.

About the Journal of Dairy Science
The Journal of Dairy Science (JDS®), official journal of the American Dairy Science Association®, is co-published by Elsevier and FASS Inc. for the American Dairy Science Association. It is the leading general dairy research journal in the world. JDS readers represent education, industry, and government agencies in more than 70 countries, with interests in biochemistry, breeding, economics, engineering, environment, food science, genetics, microbiology, nutrition, pathology, physiology, processing, public health, quality assurance, and sanitation. JDS has a 5-year Impact Factor of 3.208 according to the 2018 Journal Citation Reports®, published by Clarivate Analytics (2019). www.journalofdairyscience.org

About the American Dairy Science Association (ADSA)
The American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) is an international organization of educators, scientists, and industry representatives who are committed to advancing the dairy industry and keenly aware of the vital role the dairy sciences play in fulfilling the economic, nutritive, and health requirements of the world's population. It provides leadership in scientific and technical support to sustain and grow the global dairy industry through generation, dissemination, and exchange of information and services. Together, ADSA members have discovered new methods and technologies that have revolutionized the dairy industry. www.adsa.org

About Elsevier
Elsevier is a global information analytics business that helps scientists and clinicians to find new answers, reshape human knowledge, and tackle the most urgent human crises. For 140 years, we have partnered with the research world to curate and verify scientific knowledge. Today, we’re committed to bringing that rigor to a new generation of platforms. Elsevier provides digital solutions and tools in the areas of strategic research management, R&D performance, clinical decision support, and professional education; including ScienceDirect, Scopus, SciVal, ClinicalKey and Sherpath. Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, 39,000 e-book titles and many iconic reference works, including Gray's Anatomy. Elsevier is part of RELX, a global provider of information-based analytics and decision tools for professional and business customers. www.elsevier.com

Media contacts
Eileen Leahy
Elsevier
+1 732 238 3628
jdsmedia@elsevier.com

Ken Olson, PhD, PAS
American Dairy Science Association®
+1 630 237 4961
keolson@prodigy.net