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Phrenicoabdominal Branches of Phrenic Nerve
Nervous System

Phrenicoabdominal Branches of Phrenic Nerve

Rami phrenicoabdominalis nervi phrenici

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Quick Facts

Origin: Phrenic nerve.

Course: Inferiorly through the respiratory diaphragm, into the abdominal cavity, then laterally to ramify on the inferior surface of the diaphragm and superior surface of the peritoneum.

Branches: None.

Supply: Respiratory diaphragm, diaphragmatic pleura, falciform ligament, peritoneum, and inferior vena cava.

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Origin

The phrenicoabdominal branches of the phrenic nerve originate the base of the thoracic cavity as the phrenic nerves pierce the respiratory diaphragm and enter the abdomen.

Course

The phrenicoabdominal branches ramify on the inferior surface of the respiratory diaphragm, coursing laterality.

Branches

There are no named branches of the phrenicoabdominal branches of the phrenic nerve.

Supplied Structures & Function

The phrenicoabdominal branches are sensory nerves, supplying the respiratory diaphragm itself, its central tendon, and the overlying diaphragmatic pleura. The phrenicoabdominal branches also provide sensory innervation to upper abdominal portion of the inferior vena cava and the superior peritoneum, including the falciform ligament and coronary ligaments of the liver (Standring, 2016).

References

Standring, S. (2016) Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice. Gray's Anatomy Series 41st edn.: Elsevier Limited.

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Phrenic Nerve

ScienceDirect image

The phrenic nerve contains mechanosensitive receptors in the fibrous layer of the pericardium, which were demonstrated to have a cardiac rhythm as well as exhibiting sensitivity to increasing lung volume (Kostreva and Pontus, 1993a,b).

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