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Cerebral Peduncle
Nervous System

Cerebral Peduncle

Pedunculus cerebri

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Quick Facts

This large bundle of corticofugal fibers is also known as the crus cerebri. It descends from the cerebral cortex to the brain stem and spinal cord. The peduncle contains the corticospinal and corticopontine tracts; these control voluntary movement.

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Cerebral Peduncle

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A lesion of the cerebral peduncle results in ipsilateral oculomotor palsy and contralateral hemiparesis (Weber's syndrome), and a larger process also involving the red nucleus can cause the same findings plus contralateral involuntary limb movements or tremor (Benedikt's syndrome).

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