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Anterior Choroidal Artery (Right)
Cardiovascular System

Anterior Choroidal Artery (Right)

Arteria choroidea anterior

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Quick Facts

Origin: Internal carotid artery.

Course: Travels posteriorly then turns laterally to reach the inferior horn of lateral ventricle.

Branches: None.

Supplied Structures: Numerous structures (see below).

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Origin

The anterior choroidal artery arises from the internal carotid artery, just distal to the posterior communicating artery.

Course

The anterior choroidal artery travels backwards, above the medial aspect of the uncus. It crosses the optic tract to reach the crus cerebri, then turns laterally, crossing the optic tract again. It travels along the lateral aspect of the lateral geniculate body before entering the inferior horn of the lateral ventricle via the choroidal fissure. It ends here in the choroidal plexus.

Branches

The choroidal artery, although small, provides several unnamed ramifications to structures of the forebrain (prosencephalon) and midbrain (mesencephalon).

Supplied Structures

The anterior choroidal artery supplies the lateral ventricle, anterior perforated substance, optic chiasm, tract, and radiation, lateral geniculate body, internal capsule, genu, globus pallidus, tail of the caudate nucleus, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, fornix, amygdaloid body, hypothalamic ad thalamic nuclei, substantia nigra, and crus cerebri.

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Anterior Choroidal Artery

ScienceDirect image

Occlusion of the anterior choroidal artery may cause a homonymous defect in the upper and lower quadrants with sparing of a horizontal sector (quadruple sectoranopia), which is essentially diagnostic of a lateral geniculate body lesion in the anterior choroidal artery distribution.

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