Taste and health affect consumer choices for milk and nondairy beverages

Education on nutritional value and correcting misconceptions should be a focus of the dairy industry, according to a new study from the Journal of Dairy Science®

Philadelphia, PA, July 20, 2017

In recent years, retail sales of fluid milk have experienced significant change and per capita consumption has decreased at a rate of 830 mL per year since 1975. Between 2011 and 2014, sales of fluid milk have decreased 3.8% but the amount of nondairy, plant-based beverages sold increased 30% between 2010 and 2015. To learn more about what affects consumer decisions regarding fluid milk purchases, researchers from North Carolina State University used surveys, conjoint analysis, and means-end-chain analysis to uncover the underlying values among dairy milk and nondairy beverage consumers. The results of the study highlighted the most important factors for both milk and nondairy beverages, which were the same: they must be healthy and taste good.

No previous work directly studied values held by consumers and how those attitudes influence milk purchases. To assess this, a survey was completed by 999 primary shoppers between 25 and 70 years old, 78% female and 22% male, who reported purchasing dairy milk, nondairy beverage, or both at least two to three times per month. Most consumers (87.8%) did not follow a specific diet or claim to be lactose intolerant (88.4%). Twenty-seven percent of consumers purchased one or both beverages more than once a week, 47.0% purchased one or both beverages once a week, and 25.0% purchased one or both beverages two to three times per month.

Consumers ranked fat as the most important attribute in dairy milk, whereas sugar level was most important for nondairy beverages. Dairy milk consumers reported a preference for 2% or 1% fat, and almost 70% of dairy milk sales in 2014 were reduced or fat-free milk. Nondairy consumers preferred plant beverages that were naturally sweetened or had no added sugar. Almond beverage was the most desirable plant-derived beverage, representing more than 65.0% of nondairy beverages sold in 2014. Protein had universal appeal for both milk and nondairy beverages, with higher utility scores for higher levels of protein content.

“We found that consumers choose milk based on habit or because they like the flavor. Milk that is appealing in flavor could convince nondairy beverage drinkers to consumer more dairy milk; likewise, lactose-free milk or milk from grass-fed cows might also be appealing,” lead author Kara McCarthy said. “By further focusing consumer education on trust building as well as nutrition, farm practice, and animal welfare, the appeal of dairy milk could be broadened.”

With the results of this study in mind, along with the many features attractive to consumers of both dairy milk and nondairy beverages, the dairy industry can more effectively market and position milk as well as dispel any misconceptions.

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Notes for editors
“Drivers of choice for fluid milk versus plant-based alternatives: What are consumer perceptions of fluid milk?” by K. S. McCarthy, M. Parker, A. Ameerally, S. L. Drake, and M. A. Drake (https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2016-12519). It appears in the Journal of Dairy Science, volume 100, issue 8 (August 2017) published by Elsevier.

Full text of the article is available to credentialed journalists upon request; contact Eileen Leahy at +1 732-238-3628 or jdsmedia@elsevier.com to obtain copies. To schedule an interview with the authors, please contact MaryAnne Drake at maryanne_drake@ncsu.edu.

About the Journal of Dairy Science®
The Journal of Dairy Science (JDS), official journal of the American Dairy Science Association®, is co-published by Elsevier and FASS Inc. for the American Dairy Science Association. It is the leading general dairy research journal in the world. JDS readers represent education, industry, and government agencies in more than 70 countries, with interests in biochemistry, breeding, economics, engineering, environment, food science, genetics, microbiology, nutrition, pathology, physiology, processing, public health, quality assurance, and sanitation. www.journalofdairyscience.org

About the American Dairy Science Association (ADSA)
The American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) is an international organization of educators, scientists, and industry representatives who are committed to advancing the dairy industry and keenly aware of the vital role the dairy sciences play in fulfilling the economic, nutritive, and health requirements of the world's population. It provides leadership in scientific and technical support to sustain and grow the global dairy industry through generation, dissemination, and exchange of information and services. Together, ADSA members have discovered new methods and technologies that have revolutionized the dairy industry. www.adsa.org

About Elsevier
Elsevier is a global information analytics business that helps institutions and professionals progress science, advance healthcare and improve performance for the benefit of humanity. Elsevier provides digital solutions and tools in the areas of strategic research management, R&D performance, clinical decision support, and professional education; including ScienceDirect, Scopus, ClinicalKey and Sherpath. Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, more than 35,000 e-book titles and many iconic reference works, including Gray's Anatomy. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a global provider of information and analytics for professionals and business customers across industries. www.elsevier.com

Media contact
Eileen Leahy
Elsevier
+1 732-238-3628
jdsmedia@elsevier.com