Canadian Journal of Cardiology Publishes First Report of Increased Safety Using Simultaneous Techniques for Cardiac Testing

High-definition CT scans reduce radiation exposure

Philadelphia, PA, October 19, 2011– Canadian Journal of Cardiology ( www.onlinecjc.ca) has published a paper on the safety of cardiac imaging methods. This study is important for patients worried about radiation exposure during X-ray based studies of the heart. X-ray based methods have greatly improved the diagnosis of heart disease, but they can produce significant levels of radiation exposure.

New imaging methods offer the possibility of much safer external investigations for conditions that in the past required potentially dangerous probes within the body (like wires or tubes within blood vessels). One example is high-definition CT scans to look at the arteries of the heart and diagnose coronary artery disease. However, such procedures have required radiation levels that could themselves be potentially dangerous. Dr. Heydari et al. provide the first report of high-definition CT scans with the simultaneous application of several techniques to reduce the level of radiation to much safer values.

In an accompanying editorial in the same issue of Canadian Journal of Cardiology titled, “Cardiac Computed Tomography and Risks of Radiation Exposure: How Low Can We Go?”, Paul Galiwango, MD, commented that although the study has limitations, the results demonstrate that reduction techniques are feasible and should be adopted whenever possible. They offer the challenge, “Do we need to go even lower?”

”Previous studies have shown that radiation exposure during cardiac diagnostic tests can increase cancer risk. This paper reports how various new methods can be applied to reduce radiation exposure during cardiac diagnostic tests by about 75-85%. The procedures they describe can greatly reduce patient risk,” comments Stanley Nattel, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

The paper is “Diagnostic Performance of High-Definition Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Performed With Multiple Radiation Dose Reduction Strategies,” by Bobak Heydari, MD, Jonathon Leipsic, MD, G.B. John Mancini, MD, James K. Min, MD, Troy LaBounty, MD, C. Taylor, MD, Gabriela V. Cohen Freue, PhD, and Brett Heilbron, MD (doi:10.1016/j.cjca.2010.12.026). It appears inCanadian Journal of Cardiology, Volume 27, Issue 5 (September 2011) published by Elsevier.

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About the Canadian Journal of Cardiology
The Canadian Journal of Cardiology ( www.onlinecjc.ca) is the official journal of the  Canadian Cardiovascular Society. It is a vehicle for the international dissemination of new knowledge in cardiology and cardiovascular science, particularly serving as a major venue for the results of Canadian cardiovascular research and Society guidelines. The journal publishes original reports of clinical and basic research relevant to cardiovascular medicine as well as editorials, review articles, case reports, and papers on health outcomes, policy research, ethics, medical history, and political issues affecting practice.

About the Editor-in-Chief 
Editor-in-Chief Stanley Nattel, MD, is Paul-David Chair in Cardiovascular Electrophysiology and Professor of Medicine at the University of Montreal and Director of the Electrophysiology Research Program at the Montreal Heart Institute Research Center.

About the Canadian Cardiovascular Society 
The Canadian Cardiovascular Society is the professional association for Canadian cardiovascular physicians and scientists working to promote cardiovascular health and care through knowledge translation, professional development, and leadership in health policy. The CCS provides programs and services to its 1900+ members and others in the cardiovascular community, including guidelines for cardiovascular care, the annual Canadian Cardiovascular Congress, and, with the Canadian Cardiovascular Academy, programs for trainees. More information about the CCS and its activities can be found at  www.ccs.ca

About Elsevier
Elsevier is a global information analytics company that helps institutions and professionals progress science, advance healthcare and improve performance for the benefit of humanity. Elsevier provides digital solutions and tools in the areas of strategic research management, R&D performance, clinical decision support, and professional education; including ScienceDirect, Scopus, ClinicalKey and Sherpath. Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, more than 35,000 e-book titles and many iconic reference works, including Gray's Anatomy. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics to professionals and business customers, in a wide range of industries. www.elsevier.com

Media contact
Francesca Costanzo
Elsevier
+1 215 239 3249
f.costanzo@elsevier.com