Case Study: Designing a natural substation to achieve low operational costs

Knovel helps to originate an efficient, small-scale purification system that also ensures safe operation and regulatory compliance

A leading multinational oil and gas company took on a project that required the construction of a pipeline in Alaska to transport natural gas from a remote field to a distant processing plant. The project also required the designing and building of a small substation, where a portion of the natural gas would be purified for a local community’s use. A lead applications engineer used answers and insights from Knovel to design a purification system, resulting in affordable operating costs.

Designing a natural substation to achieve low operational costs - Knovel Case Study | Elsevier Solutions

Challenge

The purification operation for the substation required the removal of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide from the gas, as well as a dehydration procedure to eliminate water molecules from it. The lead applications engineer could not rely on traditional designs for this unusual project, so he needed to find information that would enable him to originate a reliable, efficient process for a small-scale processing plant in a remote, cold-weather location.

Solution

The engineer turned to Knovel to find aggregated and trusted information about a wide range of topics, including how to remove oil and condensate—as well as hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide—from natural gas. He also used Knovel to find materials suitable for cold environments and to research industrial safety, plant design and process refinement topics. He easily discovered critical property data detailing the hazard, toxicity and carcinogenicity of various potential adsorbents, as well as best practices for handling hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. Additionally, he consulted Knovel to access important regulatory information.


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"Relying on the answers and insights available in Knovel, the engineer designed a $4 million gas substation that uses a regenerative adsorbent."

Impact

Relying on the answers and insights available in Knovel, the engineer designed a $4 million gas substation that uses a regenerative adsorbent, which means it is capable of running uninterrupted for a year without replacing the adsorbent. It achieves its target of producing an annual output of one metric ton of natural gas for local consumption. His design provides efficient gas processing, saving the company substantial money in operating and maintenance costs. The information found in Knovel also enabled him to discuss the relevant technology with vendors, improving their knowledgebase and reducing the time needed for the design and build phases.


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"[The substation] achieves its target of producing an annual output of one metric ton of natural gas for local consumption."

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