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Posterior Branch of Obturator Nerve
Nervous System

Posterior Branch of Obturator Nerve

Ramus posterior nervi obturatorii

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Quick Facts

Origin: Obturator nerve.

Course: Descends on the posterior surface of adductor brevis and anterior to adductor magnus muscle.

Branches: Muscular and articular branches.

Supply: Motor innervation to obturator externus, adductor brevis, and part of the adductor magnus muscle; Sensory innervation of the knee joint.

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Origin

The posterior branch originates inside the obturator canal as one of two main divisions of the obturator nerve. The other branch is the anterior branch of the obturator nerve.

Course

The obturator nerve continues to descend across the lateral wall of the pelvic cavity until it reaches the obturator canal, where it divides into anterior and posterior branches. Through the obturator canal, the posterior branch of the obturator nerve gains access to the medial compartment of the thigh. It then descends posterior to adductor brevis and on the anterior surface of adductor magnus muscle.

Branches

The posterior branch of the obturator nerve gives off muscular branches to the obturator externus muscle (L3-L4), adductor brevis muscle (L2-L3), and the part of the adductor magnus muscle (L2-L4). In addition, articular branches are given to the knee joint.

Supplied Structures

The posterior branch of the obturator nerve provides motor innervation to the obturator externus muscle (L3-L4), adductor brevis muscle (L2-L3), and part of the adductor magnus muscle that attaches to the linea aspera (L2-L4). It also provides sensory innervation to the knee joint.

Learn more about this topic from other Elsevier products

Obturator Nerve

ScienceDirect image

Destruction of the obturator nerve also is useful in the palliation of hip adductor spasm after spinal cord injury or stroke that limits the ability to provide perineal care or perform urinary catheterization, and inhibits sexual intercourse.

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