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Second Lumbrical Muscle of Foot
Muscular System

Second Lumbrical Muscle of Foot

Musculus lumbricalis pedis secundus

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Quick Facts

Origin: Tendons of flexor digitorum longus that travel to the second and third toes.

Insertion: Medial aspect of extensor expansion of third toe.

Action: Simultaneously flexes metatarsophalangeal joint and extends interphalangeal joints of third toe.

Innervation: Deep branch of lateral plantar nerve (S2-S3).

Arterial Supply: Lateral plantar artery, deep plantar arch, and plantar metatarsal arteries.

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Origin

The second lumbrical muscle of foot consists of two heads:

- the medial head, which originates from the lateral aspect of the tendon of flexor digitorum longus that travels to the second toe;

- the lateral head, which originates from the medial aspect of the tendon of flexor digitorum longus that travels to the third toe.

Insertion

The fibers of the second lumbrical muscle of foot travel anteriorly to the third toe and insert, via a short tendon, onto the medial aspect of the extensor expansion of the third toe.

Key Features & Anatomical Relations

The second lumbrical muscle of foot is located in the second layer of muscles that are found in the plantar part of the foot. It is a short, wormlike, bipennate skeletal muscle.

It is located:

- superficial (inferior) to the adductor hallucis muscle and the first plantar interosseous muscle of foot;

- deep (superior) to the plantar aponeurosis;

- medial to the tendon of flexor digitorum longus that travels to the third toe;

- lateral to the tendon of flexor digitorum longus that travels to the second toe.

Actions

The second lumbrical muscle of foot simultaneously flexes the third metatarsophalangeal joint and extends the interphalangeal joints of the third toe (Moore, Dalley and Agur, 2009).

List of Clinical Correlates

- Clawing of the toes

- Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

References

Moore, K. L., Dalley, A. F. and Agur, A. M. R. (2009) Clinically Oriented Anatomy. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Learn more about this topic from other Elsevier products

Foot Muscle

ScienceDirect image

In fact, atrophy of foot muscles is even observed in patients without clinical signs of DSPN, underlining the presence of motor changes in DSPN well in advance of clinical findings and complaints [85].

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