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Platysma
Muscular System

Platysma

Platysma

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Quick Facts

Origin: Pectoral fascia.

Insertion: Inferior border of mandible and adjacent muscles.

Action: Tenses skin of neck; depresses mandible.

Innervation: Cervical branch of facial nerve (CN VII).

Arterial Supply: Submental and suprascapular arteries.

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Related parts of the anatomy

Origin

The platysma is a thin muscle that blends with the fascia covering the deltoid and pectoralis major muscles.

Insertion

The fibers of the platysma muscle attach to the lower border of the mandible and the surrounding muscles, including the depressor anguli oris and depressor labii inferioris muscles.

Key Features & Anatomical Relations

The platysma muscle may also be considered a muscle of the neck since the bulk of the muscle sits there. However, the platysma muscle originates from the second pharyngeal arch during embryonic development and is innervated by the facial nerve; thus, it is categorized as a facial muscle.

Actions

The platysma muscle is involved in multiple actions:

- tenses the skin of the neck;

- draws the lips and angles of the mouth downwards;

- assists in depression of the mandible at the temporomandibular joint (Standring, 2016).

List of Clinical Correlates

- Bell’s palsy

References

Standring, S. (2016) Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice. Gray's Anatomy Series 41st edn.: Elsevier Limited.

Learn more about this topic from other Elsevier products

Platysma Muscle

ScienceDirect image

The platysma muscle is a broad, thin muscle that extends from the mandible, perioral musculature, and the dermal attachments at the inferior cheek to the cervicopectoral fascia inferiorly.

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