Skip to main content

Unfortunately we don't fully support your browser. If you have the option to, please upgrade to a newer version or use Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Edge, Google Chrome, or Safari 14 or newer. If you are unable to, and need support, please send us your feedback.

Elsevier
Publish with us
Pubic Symphysis
Connective Tissue

Pubic Symphysis

Symphysis pubica

Read more

Structure

The pubic symphysis is a secondary cartilaginous joint that consists of a fibrocartilaginous interpubic disc that lies between the symphyseal surfaces of the bodies of the right and left pubic bones. This joint is reinforced by the superior and inferior pubic ligaments. The articular surfaces of the pubic bones are coated with a thin layer of hyaline cartilage to which the fibrocartilaginous disc connects the two pubic bones.

Complete Anatomy
The world's most advanced 3D anatomy platform
Try it for Free

Anatomical Relations

Anterior to the pubic symphysis is the proximal shaft of the penis or the clitoris. In both sexes, the bladder is posterior to the upper portion of the joint and the urethra passes inferiorly.

Function

The pubic symphysis permits slight movements but primarily serves to connect the left and right ox coxae and provide stability to the pelvic girdle. It also provides protection and support to the bladder which lies posterior to it and helps to support the attachment of the clitoris (females) and the penis (males).

Learn more about this topic from other Elsevier products

Pubic Symphysis

ScienceDirect image

Inferior to the pubic symphysis and distal to the root, the three columns of tissue converge to form the shaft of the penis, comprising most of the free, mobile part of the penis.

Explore on ScienceDirect(opens in new tab/window)

Complete Anatomy

The world's most advanced 3D anatomy platform

Complete Anatomy