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Connective Tissue of Head & Neck
Connective Tissue

Connective Tissue of Head & Neck

Connectivus laxus craniocervicalis

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Description

Connective tissue is found between the organs and skeletal structures of the head and neck. There are a wide variety of different connective tissue types in this area with an equally wide variety of functions.

In the head, there are both proper and special connective tissues. Some examples of proper connective tissue are the adipose tissue located subcutaneously, fasciae dividing different compartments, and the ligaments supporting joints. Special connective tissue types are bone, blood, cartilage, etc.

The main functions of connective tissue in the head and neck, as with any other area of the body, can grossly be defined as structural and supportive.

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