Study Finds Dangerous Bacteria on Cell Phones of Hospital Patients

Washington, DC, May 31, 2011 -- Cell phones used by patients and their visitors were twice as likely to contain potentially dangerous bacteria as those of healthcare workers (HCW), according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of APIC - the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.

A team of researchers from the Department of Medical Microbiology at Inonu University in Malatya, Turkey collected swab samples from three parts of cell phones - the keypad, microphone and ear piece. A total of 200 mobile phones (MPs) were cultured for the study, 67 of which belonged to medical employees and 133 to patients, patients’ companions and visitors. The researchers found that 39.6 percent of the patient group phones and 20.6 percent of HCW phones tested positive for pathogens. Additionally, seven patient phones contained multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and multiply resistant gram-negative organisms, while no HCW phones tested positive for MDR pathogens.

“The types of bacteria that were found on the patients’ MPs and their resistance patterns were very worrisome,” state the authors. “Some investigators have reported that MPs of medical personnel may be a potential source of bacterial pathogens in the hospital setting. Our findings suggest that mobile phones of patients, patients’ companions and visitors represent higher risk for nosocomial pathogen colonization than those of HCWs. Specific infection control measures may be required for this threat.”

Hospital-acquired infections affect more than 25 percent of admitted patients in developing countries. In U.S. hospitals, they cause 1.7 million infections a year and are associated with approximately 100,000 deaths. It is estimated that one third of these infections could be prevented by adhering to standard infection control guidelines.

Full text of the article is available to journalists upon request; contact Liz Garman, APIC, +1 202-454-2604, egarman@apic.org to obtain copies.

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About AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control
AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control ( www.ajicjournal.org) covers key topics and issues in infection control and epidemiology. Infection preventionists, including physicians, nurses, and epidemiologists, rely on AJIC for peer-reviewed articles covering clinical topics as well as original research. As the official publication of  APIC - the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology - AJIC is the foremost resource on infection control, epidemiology, infectious diseases, quality management, occupational health, and disease prevention. AJIC also publishes infection control guidelines from APIC and the CDC. Published by Elsevier, AJIC is included in MEDLINE and CINAHL.

About APIC
APIC’s mission is to improve health and patient safety by reducing risks of infection and other adverse outcomes. The association’s more than 14,000 members direct infection prevention programs that save lives and improve the bottom line for hospitals and other healthcare facilities around the globe. APIC advances its mission through education, research, collaboration, practice guidance, public policy and credentialing. Visit APIC online at www.apic.org. For consumer-related information, visit www.preventinfection.org.

Notes for Editors
“Do Mobile Phones of Patients, Companions and Visitors Carry Multi Drug Resistant Hospital Pathogens?” appears in the American Journal of Infection Control, Volume 39, Issue 5 (June 2011).

Authors
Mehmet Sait Tekerekoğlu, MD
Yucel Duman, MD
Ayfer Serinda, PhD
Serpil Semiha Cuğlan, MD
Halim Kaysadu, MD
Emine Tunc, MD
Yusuf Yakupogulları, MD


Corresponding Author
Mehmet Sait Tekerekoğlu, MD, Inonu University, Malatya, Turkey

About Elsevier
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Media contact
Liz Garman
+1 202-454-2604

egarman@apic.org