2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Report Offers Food and Nutrition Practitioners Insights on Helping Americans Combat Obesity Epidemic

St. Louis, MO, 26 October, 2010 – In an insightful Commentary in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Chair of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, and Professor and Associate Dean, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, highlights the key features and noteworthy findings of the 2010 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) Report. While many of the recommendations from previous reports are reinforced, new evidence-based findings will help registered dietitians and other health care providers prioritize effective approaches towards facilitating better eating habits among Americans.

Dietary Goals for Americans (DGA) were first set in 1977 at a time when the average total fat intake was 42% of total energy intake, saturated fatty acids (SFA) intake was about 14%, and cardiovascular disease mortality was at an all-time high. Population-wide improvement in these parameters has occurred. By 2010, average American intake of total fat and SFA has decreased significantly to 33.6% and 11.4%, respectively – still higher than recommended, but certainly improved.

Meanwhile, the obesity epidemic in the US continues. “The literal ‘elephant in the room’ is the persistent and pervasive obesity epidemic that continues to perpetuate and perplex health care providers in all specialty areas, as well as consumers,” commented Professor Van Horn. This report indicates that the US population consumes inadequate nutrient-rich foods such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, and overconsumes calorie-dense, nutrient-poor foods that include solid fats, added sugars, salt, and refined grains. The result is a population that is overfed and undernourished.

Key features of the 2010 US DGAC Report:

  • It is the first totally evidence-based report that maximizes the quality, quantity, and critical organization of the underlying scientific data that fully substantiate and raise to new levels of significance the importance of these recommendations.
  • It addresses, for the first time, an unhealthy American public, with the majority (72.3% of women, 64.1% of men) classified as overweight or obese and the rest at risk of becoming obese. This increases the level of intensity, urgency, and significance associated with the translation and implementation of these DGA.
  • It includes a strong and emerging evidence base on infants, children, and pregnant women, vulnerable subgroups. All previous DGA have been directed at the population age 2 years and older.
  • It was conducted in a completely transparent manner with six public meetings, including three Webinars that uniquely provided worldwide, complete real-time access to all the proceedings as they occurred.
  • It includes two new chapters, one regarding the “Total Diet” to present the totality of the recommended eating patterns, and a “Translation/Implementation” chapter that provides the environmental context that affects the overall usefulness and adaptation of the DGA.

The report highlights other noteworthy findings of particular importance for registered dietitians. Between 1970 and 2010, energy intake has increased by over 600 calories per day. Grain-based desserts (for example, cakes and cookies) are the highest ranking contributor to energy intake in the US population, while sodas and sports drinks provide the highest source of calories to adolescents, followed closely by pizza.

Given the dismal success rate of weight loss efforts in adulthood, and the even less successful efforts to maintain weight loss once it is achieved, this report stresses the importance of recognizing that primary prevention of obesity beginning in childhood is potentially the single most powerful method for halting and reversing America’s obesity epidemic.

Professor Van Horn writes that “tremendous input was provided by an exceptional team of highly qualified, experienced, knowledgeable, and dedicated registered dietitians from many different backgrounds whose efforts made all the difference in achieving this herculean effort. In conclusion, this commentary serves to congratulate and distinguish the many contributions of RDs, American Dietetic Association members, and others throughout this process.” She notes further that, “Encouraging these changes will require partnership with policymakers, industry, and consumers. RDs are key to facilitating these changes, along with dietetic technicians, registered dieticians, and other health care providers.”

The 2010 DGAC report is available online at http://www.dietaryguidelines.gov/.

The Commentary is “Development of the 2010 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Report: Perspectives from a Registered Dietitian” by Linda Van Horn, PhD, RD. It appears in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Volume 110 Issue 11 (November 2010) published by Elsevier.

A video featuring discussion by Linda Van Horn regarding the findings and recommendations of the 2010 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Report may be viewed at http://adajournal.org/content/podcast.

# # #

Notes for Editors
Full text of this article is available to journalists upon request. Contact Nancy Burns at 314-447-8013 or jadamedia@elsevier.com to obtain copies.

Journalists wishing to set up interviews with Linda Van Horn should contact Maureen Callahan, Northwestern University, 312-908-1723, maureen-callahan@northwestern.edu.

A video featuring Linda Van Horn (under embargo until October 26, 2010, 12:01 AM ET) and information specifically for journalists are located at http://adajournal.org/content/mediapodcast. Excerpts from the video may be reproduced by the media; contact Nancy Burns to obtain permission.

About The Journal of The American Dietetic Association
The official journal of the American Dietetic Association (www.eatright.org) the Journal of the American Dietetic Association (www.adajournal.org) is the premier source for the practice and science of food, nutrition and dietetics. The monthly, peer-reviewed journal presents original articles prepared by scholars and practitioners and is the most widely read professional publication in the field. The Journal focuses on advancing professional knowledge across the range of research and practice issues such as: nutritional science, medical nutrition therapy, public health nutrition, food science and biotechnology, food service systems, leadership and management and dietetics education.

The Journal has been ranked 16th of 66 journals in Impact Factor in the Nutrition and Dietetics category of the Journal Citation Reports® 2010, published by Thomson Reuters, with an impact factor of 3.128.

About The American Dietetic Association
The American Dietetic Association is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. ADA is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy.

About Elsevier
Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions — among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Research Intelligence and ClinicalKey— and publishes over 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and more than 35,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a world-leading provider of information and analytics for professional and business customers across industries. www.elsevier.com

Media Contact
Nancy Burns
Elsevier
+1 314-447-8013
jadamedia@elsevier.com

Ryan O’Malley
American Dietetic Association
+1 800-877-1600, ext. 4769
media@eatright.org