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Buccal Branches of Facial Nerve
Nervous System

Buccal Branches of Facial Nerve

Ramus buccalis nervus facialis

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Quick Facts

Origin: Inferior division of the facial nerve.

Course: Runs anteriorly through the parotid gland to the region of the upper lip.

Branches: None.

Supply: Motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression located in the middle portion of the face.

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Origin

The buccal branches of the facial nerve originate when the inferior division of the facial nerve splits. This occurs in the substance of the parotid gland.

Course

From its origin, the buccal branches of the facial nerve run anteriorly out of the parotid gland. They continue forward, below and roughly parallel to the zygomatic arch towards the upper lips and lower nasal region.

Branches

There are no named branches, however, the buccal branches of the facial nerve split into many unnamed branches that form an infraorbital plexus, some of which run more superficially, with others running deeper.

Supplied Structures

The buccal branches of the facial nerve are motor nerves that innervate many of the muscles of facial expression in the middle of the face. It sends branchial motor efferents.

The muscles innervated by the buccal branch include the levator labii superioris, levator labii superioris alaeque nasi, risorius, buccinator, nasalis, depressor septi, depressor anguli oris, levator anguli oris, zygomaticus major, and zygomaticus minor muscles.

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Buccal Branch of the Facial Nerve

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The buccal branch of the facial nerve innervates the buccinator, levator labii, anguli oris, and orbicularis oris.

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