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Renal Fascia (Left)
Connective Tissue

Renal Fascia (Left)

Fascia renalis

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Structure/Morphology

The renal fascia is the layer of fascia that encompasses the entirety of the kidneys, adrenal glands, and ureters down to the pelvic region. It is embryologically distinct from the extraperitoneal fascia that lines the body wall musculature and forms the posterior margin of the retroperitoneum, and from the parietal peritoneum that forms the anterior margin of the retroperitoneum as well (Mirilas and Skandalakis, 2009).

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Anatomical Relations

The renal fascia consists of an anterior perirenal fascia that separates the perirenal space from the anterior portions of the retroperitoneum, and a posterior perirenal fascia that sits anterior to the pararenal fat body, found in the posterior pararenal space. Inferiorly, the anterior and posterior perirenal fascia follow the ureters down into the pelvic cavity. Superiorly, they blend together before splitting to then envelope the adrenal glands. Laterally, these two fascial layers merge with each other and the lateroconal fascia that is found in the colonic gutter. Medially, the anterior and posterior perirenal fascia can run together across the midline anterior to the aorta and inferior vena cava and merge with the perirenal fascia of the opposite side (Standring, 2016).

Function

The renal fascia encompasses the kidneys, adrenal glands, and ureters, and by virtue of encompassing these organs and the adipose tissue that surround them, creates the perirenal space.

References

Mirilas, P. and Skandalakis, J. E. (2009) 'Surgical anatomy of the retroperitoneal spaces--part I: embryogenesis and anatomy', Am Surg, 75(11), pp. 1091-7.

Standring, S. (2016) Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice. Gray's Anatomy Series 41st edn.: Elsevier Limited.

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Kidney Capsule

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For example, the kidney capsule of Foxd1 null kidneys develops aberrantly as a thickened mesenchyme continuous with the body wall, and the cells forming the mutant capsule stain positive for markers of endothelial cells [58].

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