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Fasciae
Connective Tissue

Fasciae

Fasciae

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Description

Fascia is a general term to describe large sheaths of connective tissue that are discernible by the naked eye. It is a dense, fibrous tissue with fibers orientated parallel to one another.

In the musculoskeletal system, there is generally a superficial facial layer (subcutaneous tissue [TA] or hypodermis) that sits between the skin and the deep membranous fascia that surrounds the underlying muscular layer. The deep fascia extends around individual muscles (investing fascia), and around groups of muscles and thus dividing them into compartments (intermuscular septa). The composition and presence of the subcutaneous and deep membranous layers vary according to the region of the body (Standring, 2016). Fascia may be defined in relation to the viscera that it surrounds.

Thickened condensations of fascia are often termed ligaments and are not to be confused with the ligaments that connect bone to bone. Larger neurovascular bundles are sometimes contained within a fascial sheath, such as the carotid or femoral sheaths.

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References

Standring, S. (2016) Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice. Gray's Anatomy Series 41st edn.: Elsevier Limited.

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Fascia

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Subcutaneous fascia is the connective tissue under the skin that completely surrounds the individual in two layers known as superficial fascia and deep fascia, which adhere to each other.

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