Shoulder and Elbow Trauma and its Complications - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782424499, 9781782424727

Shoulder and Elbow Trauma and its Complications

1st Edition

Volume 1: The Shoulder

Editors: Michael Greiwe
eBook ISBN: 9781782424727
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782424499
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 3rd August 2015
Page Count: 510
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Table of Contents

  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • Part One: Shoulder Trauma
    • 1: Anterior instability: Shoulder dislocations, instability, and the labrum
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Anatomy and biomechanics of anterior instability
      • 1.3 Epidemiology and natural history
      • 1.4 Patient history
      • 1.5 Physical examination
      • 1.6 Radiographic evaluation
      • 1.7 Factors leading to recurrent instability
      • 1.8 Treatment
      • 1.9 Arthroscopic intervention for the first-time dislocator
      • 1.10 Hill–Sachs lesions: Soft-tissue procedures
      • 1.11 Hill–Sachs lesions: Bony procedures
      • 1.12 Bipolar lesions
      • 1.13 Complications
      • 1.14 Future directions
      • 1.15 Conclusion
    • 2: Posterior and multidirectional instability: Shoulder dislocations, instability, and the labrum
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Anatomy
      • 2.3 Etiology
      • 2.4 Physical examination
      • 2.5 Imaging
      • 2.6 Management
      • 2.7 Author's preferred surgical technique for posterior capsulolabral reconstruction
      • 2.8 Preferred surgical technique for arthroscopic anterior capsulorrhaphy
      • 2.9 Surgical outcomes
      • 2.10 Complications
      • 2.11 Controversies
      • 2.12 Future trends
      • 2.13 Conclusions
    • 3: Traumatic rotator cuff tears
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Physical exam
      • 3.3 Imaging
      • 3.4 Pathology
      • 3.5 Nonoperative management
      • 3.6 Operative management
      • 3.7 Future directions
      • 3.8 Sources of additional information
      • 3.9 Conclusion
    • 4: Proximal humerus fractures: Evaluation, management, and nonsurgical treatment
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Background
      • 4.2 Epidemiology
      • 4.3 Anatomy and biomechanics of the proximal humerus
      • 4.4 Risk factors for fracture
      • 4.5 Classification
      • 4.6 Evaluation of proximal humerus fractures
      • 4.7 Management
      • 4.8 Nonsurgical management—Complications
      • 4.9 Conclusions
      • 4.10 Future directions
    • 5: Proximal humerus fractures: Percutaneous fixation, proximal humeral nailing, and open reduction and internal fixation
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Anatomy/biomechanics
      • 5.3 Classification
      • 5.4 Surgical decision making
      • 5.5 Management
    • 6: Proximal humerus fractures: Hemiarthroplasty and reverse shoulder arthroplasty
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Background
      • 6.2 Anatomy
      • 6.3 Classification
      • 6.4 Patient evaluation and preoperative discussion
      • 6.5 Management
      • 6.6 Outcomes
      • 6.7 Pitfalls and pearls
      • 6.8 Conclusion
      • 6.9 Future directions
    • 7: Humeral shaft fracture
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Background: Epidemiology and history
      • 7.2 Anatomy and pattern of injury
      • 7.3 Methods
      • 7.4 Future treatment and trends
    • 8: Glenoid and other scapula fractures
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Conclusion
    • 9: Clavicle fractures
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Anatomy
      • 9.3 Epidemiology
      • 9.4 Risk factors
      • 9.5 Mechanisms of injury
      • 9.6 Clinical presentation
      • 9.7 Diagnostic imaging
      • 9.8 Classifications of fractures
      • 9.9 Clinical decision making
      • 9.10 Complications
      • 9.11 Outcomes
      • 9.12 Pediatric fractures of the clavicle
      • 9.13 Future trends
      • 9.14 Sources of further information and advice
    • 10: Acromioclavicular joint injuries
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Anatomy and biomechanics
      • 10.3 Mechanism of injury
      • 10.4 Injury classification
      • 10.5 Physical exam
      • 10.6 Imaging
      • 10.7 Treatment
      • 10.8 Rehabilitation
      • 10.9 Complications
      • 10.10 Future directions
      • 10.11 Sources for further reference
    • 11: Sternoclavicular joint injury
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Anatomy/arthrology
      • 11.3 Traumatic disorders of the sternoclavicular joint
      • 11.4 Treatment
      • 11.5 Outcomes
      • 11.6 Complications
      • 11.7 Future directions
      • 11.8 Summary
    • 12: The floating shoulder
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Pathoanatomy of the floating shoulder injury
      • 12.3 Clinical evaluation
      • 12.4 Radiographic assessment
      • 12.5 Classification
      • 12.6 Treatment
      • 12.7 Outcomes
      • 12.8 Surgical technique
      • 12.9 Future directions
      • 12.10 Conclusions
  • Part Two: Managing Complications of Shoulder Trauma
    • 13: Persistent anterior shoulder instability following surgical stabilization
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Risk factors for persistent instability
      • 13.3 Revision treatment options and associated outcomes
      • 13.4 Risk factors for revision failures
      • 13.5 Future directions
    • 14: The painful labral repair
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Evaluation
      • 14.3 Preoperative factors
      • 14.4 Intraoperative factors
      • 14.5 Postoperative factors
      • 14.6 Conclusion
      • 14.7 Future directions
      • 14.8 Sources for review
    • 15: Nonunion of proximal humerus fractures
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Nonunions of nonoperatively treated proximal humerus fractures
      • 15.3 Nonunions of operatively treated proximal humerus fractures
      • 15.4 Future trends
    • 16: Proximal humerus malunion
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Background
      • 16.2 Nonoperative treatment
      • 16.3 Surgical considerations
      • 16.4 Surgical techniques
      • 16.5 Postoperative rehabilitation
      • 16.6 Future trends
      • 16.7 Sources of further information and advice (pearls and pitfalls)
      • 16.8 Conclusions
    • 17: Humeral shaft nonunion
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Patient presentation
      • 17.3 Medical optimization
      • 17.4 Nonoperative management
      • 17.5 Operative management
      • 17.6 Outcomes
      • 17.7 Complications
      • 17.8 Summary
      • 17.9 Future trends
      • 17.10 Sources of additional information
    • 18: Clavicle nonunion and malunion
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Anatomy
      • 18.3 Fracture location
      • 18.4 Malunion
      • 18.5 Nonunion
      • 18.6 Technical considerations
      • 18.7 Future trends
    • 19: Failed acromioclavicular joint reconstruction
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Outline
      • 19.2 Background
      • 19.3 Anatomy and biomechanics of the AC joint
      • 19.4 Diagnostic workup
      • 19.5 Imaging
      • 19.6 Classification of AC joint separations
      • 19.7 Surgical options for AC joint separations
      • 19.8 Historical methods of fixation
      • 19.9 Current reconstructive options
      • 19.10 Complications
      • 19.11 Management of the failed AC joint reconstruction
      • 19.12 The salvage AC joint stabilization operation (surgical technique)
      • 19.13 Rehabilitation
      • 19.14 Conclusions
      • 19.15 Future trends
    • 20: Post-traumatic arthropathy and traumatic osteonecrosis of the shoulder
      • Abstract
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Traumatic osteonecrosis
      • 20.3 Post-traumatic glenohumeral arthropathy
      • 20.4 Conclusions and future trends
    • 21: Failed arthroplasty after proximal humerus fracture
      • Abstract
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Clinical presentation
      • 21.3 Specific failures types and treatments
      • 21.4 Infection
      • 21.5 Outcome of revision to reverse replacement
      • 21.6 Failure of reverse arthroplasty for fracture
      • 21.7 Authors preferred techniques for revision of failed arthroplasty for fracture
      • 21.8 Future trends
      • 21.9 Conclusions
  • Index

Description

Traumatic injuries to the shoulder remain a problem encountered by young and old alike. Trauma surgeons and shoulder and elbow specialists are called upon daily to improve the quality of life of injured individuals by restoring function, decreasing pain and returning individuals to their previous occupations and places in society. Such treatment provides both humanitarian and economic impact. Only recently have techniques and technology allowed surgeons to restore lives to such a degree following these injuries. Still, shoulder and elbow trauma remains a vexing problem for patients and surgeons alike. Many injuries result in lost work and serious debility including lack of function, post-traumatic arthritis and pain. This important textbook provides a systematic and comprehensive guide to the different types of shoulder trauma and the management of its associated complications.

In Part One, the focus is on the most common types of shoulder trauma, with chapters covering anterior instability, traumatic rotator cuff tears, fractures, joint injuries and the floating shoulder and includes sections on the most common complications befalling each injury. Part II then reviews the management of the most common complications. Chapters include detailed analyses of persistent anterior shoulder instability, several forms of nonunion and malunion, failed acromioclavicular joint reconstruction, post-traumatic arthropathy and traumatic osteonecrosis, and failed arthroplasty for fracture.

Key Features

  • Reviews common types of shoulder trauma
  • Addresses the common complications associated with each injury
  • Provides a detailed guide to the management of common complications

Readership

Qualified clinicians and those in training in the orthopaedic field.


Details

No. of pages:
510
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782424727
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782424499

About the Editors

Michael Greiwe Editor

Dr R. Michael Greiwe is Director of Orthopaedic Research at Commonwealth Orthopaedic Centre. He has published widely on shoulder, elbow and sports medicine and has received awards for outstanding reasearch in orthopaedic surgery.

Affiliations and Expertise

Commonwealth Orthopedic Centers, Kentucky, USA