Human Osteology

Human Osteology

3rd Edition - January 21, 2011

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  • Authors: Tim White, Michael Black, Pieter Folkens
  • eBook ISBN: 9780080920856
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780123741349

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Description

A classic in its field, Human Osteology has been used by students and professionals through nearly two decades. Now revised and updated for a third edition, the book continues to build on its foundation of detailed photographs and practical real-world application of science. New information, expanded coverage of existing chapters, and additional supportive photographs keep this book current and valuable for both classroom and field work. Osteologists, archaeologists, anatomists, forensic scientists and paleontologists will all find practical information on accurately identifying, recovering, and analyzing and reporting on human skeletal remains and on making correct deductions from those remains.

Key Features

  • From the world renowned and bestselling team of osteologist Tim D. White, Michael T. Black and photographer Pieter A. Folkens
  • Includes hundreds of exceptional photographs in exquisite detail showing the maximum amount of anatomical information
  • Features updated and expanded coverage including forensic damage to bone and updated case study examples
  • Presents life sized images of skeletal parts for ease of study and reference

Readership

Undergraduate and graduate students studying human skeletal anatomy in physical anthropology, archaeology, and medical school courses aimed at the needs of coroners and forensic pathologists; essential basic reference and field manual for professional osteologists and anatomists, forensic scientists, paleontologists, and archaeologists

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Third Edition

    Preface to the Second Edition

    Preface to the First Edition

    Chapter 1. Introduction

    1.1. Human Osteology

    1.2. A Guide to the Text

    1.3. Teaching Osteology

    1.4. Resources for the Osteologist

    1.5. Studying Osteology

    1.6. Working with Human Bones

    Chapter 2. Anatomical Terminology

    2.1. Planes of Reference

    2.2. Directional Terms

    2.3. Motions of the Body

    2.4. General Bone Features

    2.5. Useful Prefixes and Suffixes

    2.6. Anatomical Regions

    2.7. Shape-related Terms

    Chapter 3. Bone Biology and Variation

    3.1. Variation

    3.2. A Few Facts about Bone

    3.3. Bones as Elements of the Musculoskeletal System

    3.4. Gross Anatomy of Bones

    3.5. Molecular Structure of Bone

    3.6. Histology and Metabolism of Bone

    3.7. Bone Growth

    3.8. Morphogenesis

    3.9. Bone Repair

    Chapter 4. Skull

    4.1. Handling the Skull

    4.2. Elements of the Skull

    4.3. Growth and Architecture, Sutures and Sinuses

    4.4. Skull Orientation

    4.5. Craniometric Landmarks

    4.6. Learning Cranial Skeletal Anatomy

    4.7. Frontal (Figures 4.13–4.16)

    4.8. Parietals (Figures 4.17–4.18)

    4.9. Temporals (Figures 4.19–4.21)

    4.10. Auditory Ossicles (Figure 4.22)

    4.11. Occipital (Figures 4.23–4.24)

    4.12. Maxillae (Figure 4.25)

    4.13. Palatines (Figure 4.26)

    4.14. Vomer (Figure 4.27)

    4.15. Inferior Nasal Conchae (Figure 4.28)

    4.16. Ethmoid (Figure 4.29)

    4.17. Lacrimals (Figure 4.30)

    4.18. Nasals (Figure 4.31)

    4.19. Zygomatics (Figure 4.32)

    4.20. Sphenoid (Figures 4.33–4.36)

    4.21. Mandible (Figures 4.37–4.39)

    4.22. Measurements of the Skull: Craniometrics

    4.23. Cranial Nonmetric Traits

    4.24. Mastication

    Chapter 5. Teeth

    5.1. Dental Form and Function

    5.2. Dental Terminology

    5.3. Anatomy of a Tooth

    5.4. Dental Development

    5.5. Tooth Identification

    5.6. To Which Category Does the Tooth Belong? (Figure 5.5)

    5.7. Is the Tooth Permanent or Deciduous? (Figure 5.6)

    5.8. Is the Tooth an Upper or a Lower?

    5.9. What is the Position of the Tooth?

    5.10. Is the Tooth from the Right or the Left Side?

    5.11. Dental Measurements: Odontometrics (Figure 5.21)

    5.12. Dental Nonmetric Traits

    Chapter 6. Hyoid and Vertebrae

    6.1. Hyoid (Figure 6.1)

    6.2. General Characteristics of Vertebrae

    6.3. Cervical Vertebrae (n = 7) (Figures 6.2 and 6.6)

    6.4. Thoracic Vertebrae (n = 12) (Figures 6.3 and 6.8)

    6.5. Lumbar Vertebrae (n = 5) (Figures 6.4, 6.10, and 6.11)

    6.6. Vertebral Measurements (Figure 6.12)

    6.7. Vertebral Nonmetric Traits

    6.8. Functional Aspects of the Vertebrae

    Chapter 7. Thorax

    7.1. Sternum (Figures 7.1–7.2)

    7.2. Ribs (Figures 7.3–7.6)

    7.3. Functional Aspects of the Thoracic Skeleton

    Chapter 8. Shoulder Girdle

    8.1. Clavicle (Figures 8.1–8.5, 8.10)

    8.2. Scapula (Figures 8.6–8.11)

    8.3. Functional Aspects of the Shoulder Girdle

    Chapter 9. Arm

    9.1. Humerus (Figures 9.1–9.8)

    9.2. Radius (Figures 9.7, 9.9–9.15)

    9.3. Ulna (Figures 9.7, 9.16–9.22)

    9.4. Functional Aspects of the Elbow and Wrist

    Chapter 10. Hand

    10.1. Carpals (Figures 10.4–10.11)

    10.2. Metacarpals (Figures 10.12–10.18)

    10.3. Hand Phalanges (Figures 10.12–10.14, 10.19–10.21)

    10.4. Functional Aspects of the Hand

    Chapter 11. Pelvis

    11.1. Sacrum (Figures 11.1–1.5)

    11.2. Coccyx (Figure 11.6)

    11.3. Os Coxae (vav–11.12)

    11.4. Pelvis (Figures 11.13–11.14)

    11.5. Functional Aspects of the Pelvic Girdle

    Chapter 12. Leg

    12.1. Femur (Figures 12.1–12.8)

    12.2. Patella (Figures 12.9–12.10)

    12.3. Tibia (Figures 12.11–12.17)

    12.4. Fibula (Figures 12.18–12.23)

    12.5. Functional Aspects of the Knee and Ankle

    Chapter 13. Foot

    13.1. Tarsals

    13.2. Metatarsals (Figures 13.18–13.22)

    13.3. Foot Phalanges (Figures 13.18–13.20, 13.26–13.27)

    13.4. Functional Aspects of the Foot

    Chapter 14. Anatomical and Biomechanical Context

    14.1. Anatomical Conventions

    14.2. Biomechanical Conventions

    14.3. Interpreting the Figures

    14.4. Cranium and Mandible

    14.5. Clavicle

    14.6. Humerus

    14.7. Radius

    14.8. Ulna

    14.9. Os Coxae

    14.10. Femur

    14.11. Tibia

    14.12. Fibula

    Chapter 15. Field Procedures for Skeletal Remains

    15.1. Search

    15.2. Discovery

    15.3. Excavation and Retrieval

    15.4. Transport

    Chapter 16. Laboratory Procedures and Reporting

    16.1. Setting

    16.2. Stabilization

    16.3. Preparation

    16.4. Restoration

    16.5. Sorting

    16.6. Metric Acquisition and Analysis

    16.7. Photography

    16.8. Radiography

    16.9. Microscopy

    16.10. Molding and Casting

    16.11. Computing

    16.12. Reporting

    16.13. Curation

    Chapter 17. Ethics in Osteology

    17.1. Ethics and the Law

    17.2. Respecting the Dead: Appropriate Individual Behavior

    17.3. Speaking for the Dead: Ethics in Forensic Osteology

    17.4. Caring for the Dead: Considerations in the Curation of Remains

    17.5. Custody of the Dead: “Repatriation” and the U.S. Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act

    17.6. Ethics in Human Paleontology

    17.7. Relevant Codes of Ethics and Ethical Statements

    Chapter 18. Assessment of Age, Sex, Stature, Ancestry, and Identity of the Individual

    18.1. Accuracy, Precision, and Reliability of Determinations

    18.2. From Known to Unknown: Using Standard Series

    18.3. Estimation of Age

    18.4. Determination of Sex

    18.5. Estimation of Stature

    18.6. Estimation of Ancestry

    18.7. Identifying the Individual

    Chapter 19. Osteological and Dental Pathology

    19.1. Description and Diagnosis

    19.2. Skeletal Trauma

    19.3. Congenital Disorders

    19.4. Circulatory Disorders

    19.5. Joint Diseases

    19.6. Infectious Diseases and Associated Manifestations

    19.7. Metabolic Diseases

    19.8. Endocrine Disorders

    19.9. Hematopoietic and Hematological Disorders

    19.10. Skeletal Dysplasias

    19.11. Neoplastic Conditions

    19.12. Diseases of the Dentition

    19.13. Musculoskeletal Stress Markers

    Chapter 20. Postmortem Skeletal Modification

    20.1. Bone Fracture

    20.2. Bone Modification by Physical Agents

    20.3. Bone Modification by Nonhuman Biological Agents

    20.4. Bone Modification by Humans

    Chapter 21. The Biology of Skeletal Populations

    21.1. Nonmetric Variation

    21.2. Estimating Biological Distance

    21.3. Diet

    21.4. Disease and Demography

    Chapter 22. Molecular Osteology

    22.1. Sampling

    22.2. DNA

    22.3. Amino Acids

    22.4. Isotopes

    Chapter 23. Forensic Case Study

    23.1. A Disappearance in Cleveland

    23.2. Investigation

    23.3. Inventory

    23.4. Identification

    23.5. Conclusion

    Chapter 24. Forensic Case Study

    24.1. Child Abuse and the Skeleton

    24.2. A Missing Child Found

    24.3. Analysis

    24.4. The Result

    Chapter 25. Archaeological Case Study

    25.1. Background

    25.2. Geography of the Carson Sink

    25.3. Exposure and Recovery

    25.4. Analysis

    25.5. Affinity

    25.6. Osteoarthritis

    25.7. Limb Shaft Cross-Sectional Anatomy

    25.8. Physiological Stress

    25.9. Dietary Reconstruction

    25.10. The Future

    Chapter 26. Archaeological Case Study

    26.1. Cannibalism and Archaeology

    26.2. Cottonwood Canyon Site 42SA12209

    26.3. Discovery

    26.4. Analysis

    26.5. What Happened? The Osteological Contribution

    Chapter 27. Paleontological Case Study

    27.1. Atapuerca

    27.2. Discovery

    27.3. Recovery

    27.4. Paleodemography

    27.5. Paleopathology

    27.6. Functional and Phylogenetic Assessment

    27.7. Continuing Mysteries

    Chapter 28. Paleontological Case Study

    28.1. Background

    28.2. Finding Fossils

    28.3. The Geography, Geology, and Geochronology of Aramis

    28.4. Discovering “Ardi”

    28.5. Recovering “Ardi”

    28.6. Restoring “Ardi”

    28.7. Documenting “Ardi”

    28.8. Studying “Ardi”

    28.9. Publishing “Ardi”

    Appendix 1. Imaging Methodology

    Appendix 2. A Decision Tree (“Key”) Approach to Tooth Identification

    Appendix 3. Online Resources for Human Osteology

    Glossary

    Bibliography

    Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 688
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2011
  • Published: January 21, 2011
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780080920856
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780123741349

About the Authors

Tim White

Affiliations and Expertise

Human Evolution Research Center (HERC), and The Department of Integrative Biology, The University of California at Berkeley, CA, USA

Michael Black

Affiliations and Expertise

University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA

Pieter Folkens

Affiliations and Expertise

"A Higher Porpoise", Benicia, CA, USA

Ratings and Reviews

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  • ClaytonDavis Sat Oct 13 2018

    Human Ostology

    Great