Advanced Organic Waste Management

Advanced Organic Waste Management

Sustainable Practices and Approaches

1st Edition - January 6, 2022

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  • Editors: Chaudhery Hussain, Subrata Hait
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323909310
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323857925

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Description

Advanced Organic Waste Management: Sustainable Practices and Approaches provides an integrated holistic approach to the challenges associated with organic waste management, particularly related to sustainability, lifecycle assessment, emerging regulations, and novel approaches for resource and energy recovery. In addition to traditional techniques, such as anaerobic digestion, composting, innovative and emerging techniques of waste recycling like hydrothermal carbonization and vermicomposting are included. The book combines the fundamentals and practices of sustainable organic waste management with successful case studies from developed and developing countries, highlighting practical applications and challenges. Sections cover global organic waste generation, encompassing sources and types, composition and characteristics, focus on technical aspects related to various resource recovery techniques like composting and vermicomposting, cover various waste-to-energy technologies, illustrate various environmental management tools for organic waste, present innovative organic waste management practices and strategies complemented by detailed case studies, introduce the circular bioeconomy approach, and more.

Key Features

  • Presents the fundamentals and practices of sustainable, organic waste management, with emerging regulations and up-to-date analysis on environmental management tools such as lifecycle assessment in a comprehensive manner
  • Offers the latest information on novel concepts and strategies for organic waste management, particularly zero waste and the circular bioeconomy
  • Includes the latest research findings and future perspectives of innovative and emerging techniques of waste recycling, such as hydrothermal carbonization and vermicomposting

Readership

Researchers and postgraduates in environmental science and environmental engineering. Policymakers and practitioners in waste management

Table of Contents

  • Cover Image
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Table of Contents
  • Contributors
  • Part 1 Organic waste: generation, composition, and health hazards
  • Chapter 1 Organic waste: generation, composition and valorisation
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Sources, composition and characterization of the solid waste
  • 1.3 Wastes as a wealth and source of income
  • 1.4 Valorization of organic solid waste
  • 1.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Open dumping of organic waste: Associated fire, environmental pollution and health hazards
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Fires at MSW landfills
  • 2.3 Existing status of municipal solid waste management system
  • 2.4 Challenges and opportunities for organic waste treatment
  • 2.5 Approach required for sustainable organic waste management
  • 2.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 2 Resource recovery from organic waste
  • Chapter 3 Composting and vermicomposting: Process optimization for the management of organic waste
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Compositing
  • 3.3 Types of composting and time optimization
  • 3.4 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Composting techniques: utilization of organic wastes in urban areas of Indian cities
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Municipal solid waste management in Indian scenario
  • 4.3 Composting practices in urban areas
  • 4.4 Factors effecting urban composting
  • 4.5 Recovery of resources from urban waste through composting process
  • 4.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Challenges and opportunities for disposal of floral waste in developing countries by using composting method
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Sources of flower waste
  • 5.3 Types of flower used for worship
  • 5.4 Significance of flower waste management
  • 5.5 Flower waste management using different technique in current scenario
  • 5.6 Utilization of various composting process using the different composting technique for the flower waste management
  • 5.7 Case studies of composting of flower waste at SVNIT, Surat, India
  • 5.8 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Valorization of industrial solid waste through novel biological treatment methods – integrating different composting techniques
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Composting methodologies
  • 6.3 Implications of previous studies
  • 6.4 Evaluation of integrated rotary drum and vermicomposting process with three different earthworm species
  • 6.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 7 Vermicomposting of organic wastes by earthworms: Making wealth from waste by converting ‘garbage into gold' for farmers
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 7.1 Introduction: mounting organic wastes – Growing economic and environmental burden on nations
  • 7.2 Organic wastes that can be vermicomposted on large scale by earthworms
  • 7.3 Species of waste-eater earthworms which can efficiently biodegrade the organic wastes for vermicomposting
  • 7.4 Mechanism of worm action in vermicomposting of organic wastes
  • 7.5 Some key considerations in vermicomposting of organic wastes by earthworms
  • 7.6 Some conditions essential for efficient action of earthworms to degrade the organic wastes
  • 7.7 Vermicomposting of organic wastes on commercial scale: a good opportunity for promoting agri-business, creating self-employment and combating poverty for the poor farmers
  • 7.8 Nations in world promoting vermicomposting technology to convert organic wastes into wealth for farmers
  • 7.9 The social, economic and environmental benefits of vermicomposting organic wastes - Reducing the cost of construction and disposal of wastes in landfills, producing health protective organic foods and huge earthworm's biomass for their uses in production of vermi-meals, vermi-medicines, vermi-detergents and lubricants
  • 7.10 Some problems encountered during vermi-composting of organic wastes and their solutions
  • 7.11 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Current problems of vermistabilization as a sustainable strategy for recycling of excess sludge
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Vermistabilization for sludge
  • 8.3 Operation problems of vermistabilization
  • 8.4 Problems of environmental risks in sludge vermicompost
  • 8.5 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Recent advances in composting and vermicomposting techniques in the cold region: resource recovery, challenges, and way forward
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Recent composting methods adopted in the cold region
  • 9.3 Composting operations
  • 9.4 Marketing potential
  • 9.6 Conclusion
  • 9.7 Future aspects
  • Acknowledgment
  • Author statement
  • References
  • Chapter 10 Resource recovery and value addition of terrestrial weeds through vermicomposting
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Vermicomposting of selected weeds
  • 10.3 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Composting and vermicomposting of obnoxious weeds - A novel approach for the degradation of allelochemicals
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Indian terrestrial weeds and their ecological effects
  • 11.3 Composting and vermicomposting– best practice to manage terrestrial weeds
  • 11.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Vermicomposting and bioconversion approaches towards the sustainable utilization of palm oil mill waste
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Vermicomposting of palm oil mill waste
  • 12.3 Palm oil mill waste vermicompost as a soil amendment
  • 12.4 Bioenergy potential of palm oil mill waste
  • 12.5 Conclusion and future work
  • References
  • Part 3 Energy recovery from organic waste
  • Chapter 13 Composition, characteristics and challenges of OFMSW for biogas production: Influence of mechanism and operating parameters to improve digestion process
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Compositional characteristics of OFMSW
  • 13.3 Challenges in the optimization of waste through AD
  • 13.4 Operating parameter/ factors affecting the AD
  • 13.5 Technologies used for improved biogas production
  • 13.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14 Factors affecting anaerobic digestion for biogas production: a review
  • Abstract
  • Keywords
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Anaerobic digestion
  • 14.3 Factors affecting anaerobic digestion
  • 14.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15 Recent advancements in anaerobic digestion: A Novel approche for waste to energy
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Anaerobic digestion
  • 15.3 Factors affecting anaerobic digestion
  • 15.4 Limitations
  • 15.5 Methods to enhance ad process
  • 15.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16 Solid state anaerobic digestion of organic waste for the generation of biogas and bio manure
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Anaerobic digestion (AD)
  • 16.3 Critical factors influencing the AD process
  • 16.4 Influence of substrate type on AD process
  • 16.5 Classification of anaerobic digestion process based on solids concentration
  • 16.6 Operational strategies to overcome the SSAD limitations
  • 16.7 Technologies available on solid state anaerobic digestion
  • 16.8 Enhanced hydrolysis of high solid substrates
  • 16.9 Conclusions and scope for future research
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 17 Use of petroleum refinery sludge for the production of biogas as an alternative energy source: a review
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Growing demand of oil and need for alternative energy sources
  • 17.3 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18 A review on hydrothermal pretreatment of sewage sludge: Energy recovery options and major challenges
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Thermal hydrolysis (TH)
  • 18.3 Wet oxidation (WO)
  • 18.4 Hydrothermal carbonisation (HTC)
  • 18.5 Commercial systems in market
  • 18.6 Gaps and scope for future research
  • 18.7 Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Web References
  • Chapter 19 Bioreactor landfills: sustainable solution for disposal of municipal solid waste
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Dry tomb Vs bioreactor landfill
  • 19.3 Key design criteria for bioreactor landfill
  • 19.4 Utilization of LFG for electricity generation
  • 19.5 Sustainability of bioreactor landfill
  • 19.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 4 Environmental management tools for organic waste
  • Chapter 20 An approach for integrating sustainable development goals (SDGs) through organic waste management
  • Abstract
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Organic waste generation
  • 20.3 Challenges and opportunities associated with the organic waste management
  • 20.4 Potential benefits articulated towards health and safety environment
  • 20.5 Integrating sustainability with organic waste management for sustainable livelihood
  • 20.6 Conclusion
  • Declaration of competing interest
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Chapter 21 Application of remote sensing and GIS in integrated solid waste management - a short review
  • Abstract
  • 21.1 Introduction
  • 21.2 Role of GIS and RS in ISWM
  • 21.3 Application of GIS and RS in ISWM
  • 21.4 Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 5 Innovative practices for circular bioeconomy in organic waste management
  • Chapter 22 Circular system of resource recovery and reverse logistics approach: key to zero waste and zero landfill
  • Abstract
  • 22.1 Introduction
  • 22.2 Concept and philosophy of zero waste
  • 22.3 Zero landfill concept
  • 22.4 Implementation of zero waste program
  • 22.5 Life cycle management and assessment (LCA)
  • 22.6 Reverse logistics approach
  • 22.7 Green engineering principles
  • 22.8 Polluter pays principle
  • 22.9 Extended producer responsibility
  • 22.10 Zero waste index
  • 22.11 Zero waste management strategies at industrial level
  • 22.12 Benefits and challenges in implementation of zero waste philosophy
  • 22.13 Critical success factors for ‘‘Zero waste”
  • 22.14 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 23 Sustainable waste management approach: A paradigm shift towards zero waste into landfills
  • Abstract
  • 23.1 Introduction
  • 23.2 Need of the paradigm shift towards zero waste
  • 23.3 Strategic steps towards zero waste paradigm
  • 23.4 Issues in zero waste strategy development
  • 23.5 Application and limitations of the ZW framework
  • 23.6 Current scenario in smart cities
  • 23.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 24 Current trends and future challenges in smart waste management in smart cities
  • Abstract
  • 24.1 Introduction
  • 24.2 Waste management
  • 24.3 Treatments and disposal
  • 24.4 What is the need?
  • 24.5 Waste management in smart cities
  • 24.6 Sustainability framework
  • 24.7 Future developments
  • 24.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 25 Smart waste management practices in smart cities: Current trends and future perspectives
  • Abstract
  • 25.1 Introduction
  • 25.2 Waste management practices
  • 25.3 Integration of technologies for waste management in smart cities
  • 25.4 Integrated framework for smart waste management practices
  • 25.5 Factors affecting the integrated framework of smart waste management practices
  • 25.6 Uncertainties associated with smart waste management
  • 25.7 Future prospects
  • 25.8 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 26 Waste management of rural slaughterhouses in developing countries
  • Abstract
  • 26.1 Introduction
  • 26.2 Challenges in organic waste recycling
  • 26.3 Treatment alternatives of slaughterhouse waste
  • 26.4 Achievement of circular bioeconomy through waste valorization
  • 26.5 Conclusion and recommendations
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Part 6 Transition towards sustainability
  • Chapter 27 An emerging trend in waste management of COVID-19
  • Abstract
  • 27.1 Introduction
  • 27.2 Transmission, symptoms, data of COVID-19 disease
  • 27.3 Impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic
  • 27.4 Types of protective systems being used
  • 27.5 Biomedical wastes generated during COVID-19 and their effects
  • 27.6 Treatments for biomedical wastes generated during COVID-19
  • 27.7 Future outlook and challenges
  • 27.8 Websites
  • References
  • Chapter 28 Implications of COVID-19 pandemic on waste management practices: Challenges, opportunities, and strategies towards sustainability
  • Abstract
  • 28.1 Introduction
  • 28.2 The global overview of the solid waste during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • 28.3 Solid waste management and the COVID-19 pandemic
  • 28.4 Future prospects
  • 28.5 Conclusions
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 520
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: January 6, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323909310
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323857925

About the Editors

Chaudhery Hussain

Chaudhery Hussain
Chaudhery Mustansar Hussain, PhD is an Adjunct Professor, Academic Advisor and Lab Director in the Department of Chemistry & Environmental Sciences at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, New Jersey, USA. His research is focused on Application of Nanotechnology & Advanced Materials, in environment and analytical chemistry and various Industries. Dr. Hussain is the author of numerous papers in peer-reviewed journals as well as prolific author and editor of several (around 100) scientific monographs and books in his research areas.

Affiliations and Expertise

Adjunct Professor and Director of Chemistry and EVSc Labs, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, NJ, USA

Subrata Hait

Subrata Hait, Associate Professor, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, India Subrata Hait, PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Patna, Bihar, India. His current research interests include waste treatment and resource recovery, solid and hazardous waste management, composting and vermicomposting of organic waste, e-waste management. He has authored many papers at his credit in various international journals in addition to several book chapters. Apart from serving as a reviewer for different international journals published by the leading publishers including Elsevier, Dr. Hait is serving as an Academic Editor of PLOS One and an Editorial Board Member of SN Applied Sciences.

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, India

Ratings and Reviews

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  • Shantanu (. Wed Aug 18 2021

    Advanced Organic Waste Management 1st Edition

    This book will help us more about waste management and circular bio-economy. Hope all the embedding chapters would also be informatoive and encouraging for readers.