Materials Selection in Mechanical Design - 5th Edition - ISBN: 9780081005996, 9780081006108

Materials Selection in Mechanical Design

5th Edition

Authors: Michael Ashby
Paperback ISBN: 9780081005996
eBook ISBN: 9780081006108
Imprint: Butterworth-Heinemann
Published Date: 2nd November 2016
Page Count: 660
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
20% off
20% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
20% off
20% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
20% off
20% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
25% off
20% off
20% off
107.23
80.42
80.42
80.42
80.42
80.42
85.78
85.78
99.95
74.96
74.96
74.96
74.96
74.96
79.96
79.96
42.99
32.24
32.24
32.24
32.24
32.24
34.39
34.39
50.95
38.21
38.21
38.21
38.21
38.21
40.76
40.76
Unavailable
File Compatibility per Device

PDF, EPUB, VSB (Vital Source):
PC, Apple Mac, iPhone, iPad, Android mobile devices.

Mobi:
Amazon Kindle eReader.

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, Fifth Edition, describes the procedures for material selection in mechanical design in order to ensure that the most suitable materials for a given application are identified from the full range of materials and section shapes available. Extensively revised for this fifth edition, the book is recognized as one of the leading materials selection texts, providing a unique and innovative resource for students, engineers, and product/industrial designers.

Key Features

  • Includes significant revisions to chapters on advanced materials selection methods and process selection, with coverage of newer processing developments such as additive manufacturing
  • Contains a broad scope of new material classes covered in the text with expanded data tables that include “functional” materials such as piezoelectric, magnetostrictive, magneto-caloric, and thermo-electric materials
  • Presents improved pedagogy, such as new worked examples throughout the text and additional end-of-chapter exercises (moved from an appendix to the relevant chapters) to aid in student learning and to keep the book fresh for instructors through multiple semesters
  • “Forces for Change” chapter has been re-written to outline the links between materials and sustainable design

Readership

Undergraduate and graduate students majoring in engineering disciplines including materials science; mechanical aerospace and automotive engineering; engineering design; and industrial design

Table of Contents

  • Preface
    • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1. Introduction: Materials and Design
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 1.2 Materials in Design
    • 1.3 The Design Process
    • 1.4 Types of Design
    • 1.5 Design Tools and Materials Data
    • 1.6 Function, Material, Shape and Process
    • 1.7 Case Study: Devices to Open Corked Bottles
    • 1.8 Summary and Conclusions
    • 1.9 Further Reading
    • 1.10 Exercises
  • Chapter 2. Engineering Materials and Their Properties
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 2.2 The Families of Engineering Materials
    • 2.3 Materials Information for Design
    • 2.4 Material Properties and Their Units
    • 2.5 Summary and Conclusions
    • 2.6 Further Reading
    • 2.7 Exercises
  • Chapter 3. Materials Property Charts
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 3.2 Exploring Material Properties
    • 3.3 The Material Property Charts
    • 3.4 Summary and Conclusions
    • 3.5 Further Reading
    • 3.6 Exercises
  • Chapter 4. Materials Selection – The Basics
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 4.2 The Selection Strategy
    • 4.3 Attribute Limits and Material Indices
    • 4.4 The Selection Procedure
    • 4.5 Computer-Aided Selection
    • 4.6 The Structural Index
    • 4.7 Summary and Conclusions
    • 4.8 Further Reading
    • 4.9 Exercises
  • Chapter 5. Materials Selection – Case Studies
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 5.2 Materials for Oars
    • 5.3 Mirrors for Large Telescopes
    • 5.4 Materials for Table Legs
    • 5.5 Cost: Structural Materials for Buildings
    • 5.6 Materials for Flywheels
    • 5.7 Materials for Springs
    • 5.8 Elastic Hinges and Couplings
    • 5.9 Materials for Seals
    • 5.10 Deflection-Limited Design with Brittle Polymers
    • 5.11 Safe Pressure Vessels
    • 5.12 Stiff, High Damping Materials for Shaker Tables
    • 5.13 Insulation for Short-Term Isothermal Containers
    • 5.14 Energy-Efficient Kiln Walls
    • 5.15 Materials for Passive Solar Heating
    • 5.16 Materials to Minimize Thermal Distortion in Precision Devices
    • 5.17 Materials for Heat Exchangers
    • 5.18 Heat Sinks for Hot Microchips
    • 5.19 Materials for Radomes
    • 5.20 Summary and Conclusions
  • Chapter 6. Processes and Their Effect on Properties
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 6.2 Classifying Processes
    • 6.3 The Processes: Shaping, Joining, Finishing
    • 6.4 Process–Property Trajectories
    • 6.5 Summary and Conclusions
    • 6.6 Further Reading
    • 6.7 Exercises
  • Chapter 7. Processes Selection and Cost
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 7.2 Process Selection: The Strategy
    • 7.3 Implementing the Strategy: Selection Matrices
    • 7.4 Limitations and Quality
    • 7.5 Ranking: Process Cost
    • 7.6 Computer-Aided Process Selection
    • 7.7 Summary and Conclusions
    • 7.8 Further reading
    • 7.9 Exercises
  • Chapter 8. Multiple Constraints and Conflicting Objectives
    • Abstract
    • 8.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 8.2 Selection with Multiple Constraints
    • 8.3 Conflicting Objectives
    • 8.4 Summary and Conclusions
    • 8.5 Further reading
    • 8.6 Appendix: Weight Factors and Fuzzy Methods
    • 8.7 Exercises
  • Chapter 9. Multiple Constraints and Conflicting Objectives – Case Studies
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 9.2 Multiple Constraints: Light Pressure Vessels
    • 9.3 Multiple Constraints: Con-Rods for High-Performance Engines
    • 9.4 Multiple Constraints: Windings for High-Field Magnets
    • 9.5 Conflicting Objectives: Table Legs Again
    • 9.6 Conflicting Objectives: Wafer-Thin Casings for Must-Have Electronics
    • 9.7 Conflicting Objectives: Cost-Effective Bumpers
    • 9.8 Conflicting Objectives: Materials for a Disk-Brake Caliper
    • 9.9 Summary and Conclusions
  • Chapter 10. Selection of Material and Shape
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 10.2 Shape Factors
    • 10.3 Limits to Shape Efficiency
    • 10.4 Exploring Material-Shape Combinations
    • 10.5 Material Indices That Include Shape
    • 10.6 Graphical Coselecting Using Indices
    • 10.7 Architectured Materials: Microscopic Shape
    • 10.8 Summary and Conclusions
    • 10.9 Further Reading
    • 10.10 Exercises
  • Chapter 11. Material and Shape: Case Studies
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 11.2 Spars for Human-Powered Planes
    • 11.3 Forks for a Racing Bicycle
    • 11.4 Floor Joists: Wood, Bamboo or Steel?
    • 11.5 Table Legs Yet Again: Thin or Light?
    • 11.6 Increasing the Stiffness of Steel Sheet
    • 11.7 Shapes that Flex: Leaf and Strand Structures
    • 11.8 Ultra-Efficient Springs
    • 11.9 Summary and Conclusions
  • Chapter 12. Designing Hybrid Materials
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 12.2 Holes in Material–Property Space
    • 12.3 Key Concepts for Hybrid Design
    • 12.4 Composites
    • 12.5 Cellular Structures: Foams and Lattices
    • 12.6 Sandwich Structures and Multilayers
    • 12.7 Segmented Structures
    • 12.8 Summary and Conclusions
    • 12.9 Further Reading
    • Hybrid Materials – General
    • 12.10 Appendix: The Stiffness and Strength for Multilayers
    • 12.11 Exercises
  • Chapter 13. Hybrids: Case Studies
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 13.2 Designing Metal Matrix Composites
    • 13.3 Natural Fiber Composites
    • 13.4 Materials for Long-Span Power Cables
    • 13.5 Conducting Elastomers
    • 13.6 Extreme Combinations of Thermal and Electrical Conduction
    • 13.7 Refrigerator Walls
    • 13.8 Materials for Microwave-Transparent Enclosures
    • 13.9 Connectors that Don’t Relax Their Grip
    • 13.10 Exploiting Anisotropy: Heat-Spreading Surfaces
    • 13.11 The Mechanical Efficiency of Natural Materials
    • Further Reading: Natural Materials
  • Chapter 14. Materials and the Environment
    • Abstract
    • 14.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 14.2 The Material Life-Cycle
    • 14.3 Material and Energy-Consuming Systems
    • 14.4 The Eco-Attributes of Materials
    • 14.5 Life-Cycle Assessment, Eco-Audits and Energy Fingerprints
    • 14.6 Eco-Selection
    • 14.7 Case Studies: Drink Containers and Crash Barriers
    • 14.8 Summary and Conclusions
    • 14.9 Further Reading
    • 14.10 Exercises
  • Chapter 15. Materials and Industrial Design
    • Abstract
    • 15.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 15.2 The Requirements Pyramid
    • 15.3 Product Character
    • 15.4 Using Materials and Processes to Create Product Personality
    • 15.5 Case Studies: Analysing Product Personality
    • 15.6 Summary and Conclusions
    • 15.7 Further Reading
    • 15.8 Exercises
  • Chapter 16. Sustainable Response to Forces for Change
    • Abstract
    • 16.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • 16.2 Market-Pull and Science-Push
    • 16.3 Growing Population and Wealth, and Market Saturation
    • 16.4 Product Liability and Service Provision
    • 16.5 The Information Economy, Critical Materials and Circularity
    • 16.6 Response to Forces for Change: Sustainable Development
    • 16.7 Summary and Conclusions
    • 16.8 Further Reading
  • Appendix A. Data for Engineering Materials
    • A.1 Ways of Checking and Estimating Data
    • Further Reading
  • Appendix B. Useful Solutions for Standard Problems
    • Introduction and Synopsis
    • B.1 Constitutive Equations for Mechanical Response
    • B.2 Moments of Sections
    • B.3 Elastic Bending of Beams
    • B.4 Failure of Beams and Panels
    • B.5 Buckling of Columns, Plates and Shells
    • B.6 Torsion of Shafts
    • B.7 Static and Spinning Disks
    • B.8 Contact Stresses
    • B.9 Estimates for Stress Concentrations
    • B.10 Sharp Cracks
    • B.11 Pressure Vessels
    • B.12 Vibrating Beams, Tubes and Disks
    • B.13 Creep and Creep Fracture
    • B.14 Flow of Heat and Matter
    • B.15 Solutions for Diffusion Equations
    • B.16 Thermal Field for Moving Heat Source
    • B.17 Further Reading
  • Appendix C. Material Indices
    • C.1 Introduction and Synopsis
    • C.2 Uses of Material Indices
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
660
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Butterworth-Heinemann 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Butterworth-Heinemann
Paperback ISBN:
9780081005996
eBook ISBN:
9780081006108

About the Author

Michael Ashby

Royal Society Research Professor Emeritus at Cambridge University and Former Visiting Professor of Design at the Royal College of Art, London, UK

Mike Ashby is sole or lead author of several of Elsevier’s top selling engineering textbooks, including Materials and Design: The Art and Science of Material Selection in Product Design, Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, Materials and the Environment, and Materials: Engineering, Science, Processing and Design. He is also coauthor of the books Engineering Materials 1&2, and Nanomaterials, Nanotechnologies and Design.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor Emeritus, Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK