Global Physical Climatology - 2nd Edition - ISBN: 9780123285317, 9780080918624

Global Physical Climatology

2nd Edition

Authors: Dennis Hartmann
eBook ISBN: 9780080918624
Hardcover ISBN: 9780123285317
Imprint: Elsevier Science
Published Date: 15th December 2015
Page Count: 498
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out
75.41
79.00
130.00
92.95
Unavailable
File Compatibility per Device

PDF, EPUB, VSB (Vital Source):
PC, Apple Mac, iPhone, iPad, Android mobile devices.

Mobi:
Amazon Kindle eReader.

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

Global Physical Climatology, Second Edition, provides an introduction to the science of climate and climate change that spans the atmosphere, ocean, and land surface, and the interactions among them.

It begins with a basic introduction to the climate system, and then introduces the physics of the climate system, including the principles and processes that determine the structure and climate of the atmosphere, ocean, and land surface. More advanced topics apply the basic knowledge introduced to understanding natural variability of the climate in both the present and past, the sensitivity of climate to external forcing, explanations for the ice ages, and the science of human-induced climate change. The physical principles and computer models necessary for understanding past climate and predicting future climate are also discussed.

This book is recommended for upper division undergraduates and graduates in meteorology, atmospheric science, oceanography, and other environmental fields. It is also suitable for students with a background of at least one year of college physics and calculus as well as researchers in academia, government (military, NOAA, NWS), and policymakers.

Key Features

  • Covers a great range of information on the Earth’s climate system and how it works
  • Includes a basic introduction to the physics of climate suitable for physical science majors
  • Provides an overview of the central themes of modern research on climate change suitable for beginning researchers
  • Incorporates problem sets to aid learning
  • Offers an authoritative, clearly written, well-illustrated text with up-to-date data and modeling results

Readership

Upper division undergraduates and graduates in meteorology, atmospheric science, oceanography, and other environmental fields; suitable for students with a background of at least one year of college physics and calculus. Researchers in academia, government (military, NOAA, NWS). Policymakers.

Table of Contents

  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Preface to the First Edition
  • Chapter 1: Introduction to the Climate System
    • Abstract
    • 1.1. Atmosphere, ocean, and land surface
    • 1.2. Atmospheric temperature
    • 1.3. Atmospheric composition
    • 1.4. Hydrostatic balance
    • 1.5. Atmospheric humidity
    • 1.6. Atmospheric thermodynamics, vertical stability and lapse rate
    • 1.7. The world ocean
    • 1.8. The cryosphere
    • 1.9. The land surface
  • Chapter 2: The Global Energy Balance
    • Abstract
    • 2.1. Warmth and energy
    • 2.2. The solar system
    • 2.3. Energy balance of earth
    • 2.4. Emission temperature of a planet
    • 2.5. Greenhouse effect
    • 2.6. Global radiative flux energy balance
    • 2.7. Distribution of insolation
    • 2.8. The energy balance at the top of the atmosphere
    • 2.9. Poleward energy flux
  • Chapter 3: Atmospheric Radiative Transfer and Climate
    • Abstract
    • 3.1. Photons and minority constituents
    • 3.2. The nature of electromagnetic radiation
    • 3.3. Description of radiative energy
    • 3.4. Planck’s law of blackbody emission
    • 3.5. Selective absorption and emission by atmospheric gases
    • 3.6. The Lambert–Bouguer–Beer law: Formulation of flux absorption
    • 3.7. Infrared radiative transfer equation: absorption and emission
    • 3.8. Heuristic model of radiative equilibrium
    • 3.9. Clouds and radiation
    • 3.10. Radiative–convective equilibrium temperature profiles
    • 3.11. The role of clouds in the energy balance of earth
    • 3.12. A simple model for the net radiative effect of cloudiness
    • 3.13. Observations of real clouds
  • Chapter 4: The Energy Balance of the Surface
    • Abstract
    • 4.1. Contact point
    • 4.2. The surface energy budget
    • 4.3. Storage of heat in the surface
    • 4.4. Radiative heating of the surface
    • 4.5. The atmospheric boundary layer
    • 4.6. Sensible and latent heat fluxes in the boundary layer
    • 4.7. Diurnal variation of the surface energy balance
    • 4.8. Seasonal variation of the energy balance of land areas
    • 4.9. Geographic variation of the surface energy balance
  • Chapter 5: The Hydrologic Cycle
    • Abstract
    • 5.1. Water, essential to climate and life
    • 5.2. The water balance
    • 5.3. Surface water storage and runoff
    • 5.4. Precipitation and dewfall
    • 5.5. Evaporation and transpiration
    • 5.6. Annual variation of the terrestrial water balance
    • 5.7. Modeling the land surface water balance
  • Chapter 6: Atmospheric General Circulation and Climate
    • Abstract
    • 6.1. The great communicator
    • 6.2. Energy balance of the atmosphere
    • 6.3. Atmospheric motions and the meridional transport of energy
    • 6.4. The angular-momentum balance
    • 6.5. Large-scale circulation patterns and climate
  • Chapter 7: The Ocean General Circulation and Climate
    • Abstract
    • 7.1. Cauldron of climate
    • 7.2. Properties of seawater
    • 7.3. The mixed layer
    • 7.4. The wind-driven circulation
    • 7.5. Theories for wind-driven circulations
    • 7.6. The deep thermohaline circulation
    • 7.7. Transport of energy in the ocean
    • 7.8. Mechanisms of transport in the ocean
  • Chapter 8: Natural Intraseasonal and Interannual Variability
    • Abstract
    • 8.1. Stuff happens
    • 8.2. Internal atmospheric variability
    • 8.3. El Niño, La Niña, and the southern oscillation
    • 8.4. Decadal variations of weather and climate
  • Chapter 9: History and Evolution of Earth’s Climate
    • Abstract
    • 9.1. Past is prologue
    • 9.2. The instrumental record
    • 9.3. The historical record
    • 9.4. Natural recording systems: the paleoclimatic record
    • 9.5. A brief survey of Earth’s climate history
    • 9.6. Uses of paleoclimatic data
  • Chapter 10: Climate Sensitivity and Feedback Mechanisms
    • Abstract
    • 10.1. Fools’ experiments
    • 10.2. Objective measures of climate sensitivity and feedback
    • 10.3. Basic radiative feedback processes
    • 10.4. Ice–albedo feedback
    • 10.5. Dynamical feedbacks and meridional energy transport
    • 10.6. Longwave and evaporation feedbacks in the surface energy balance
    • 10.7. Cloud feedback
    • 10.8. Biogeochemical feedbacks
  • Chapter 11: Global Climate Models
    • Abstract
    • 11.1. Mathematical modeling
    • 11.2. Historical development of climate models
    • 11.3. The atmospheric component
    • 11.4. The land component
    • 11.5. The ocean component
    • 11.6. Sea ice models
    • 11.7. Validation of climate model simulations
    • 11.8. Feedback strength and sensitivity estimates from climate models
    • 11.9. Coupled atmosphere–ocean processes and the thermohaline circulation
  • Chapter 12: Natural Climate Change
    • Abstract
    • 12.1. Natural forcing of climate change
    • 12.2. Solar luminosity variations
    • 12.3. Natural aerosols and climate
    • 12.4. Volcanic eruptions and stratospheric aerosols
    • 12.5. The orbital parameter theory of ice ages
    • 12.6. Modeling of ice age climates
  • Chapter 13: Anthropogenic Climate Change
    • Abstract
    • 13.1. The wings of Daedalus
    • 13.2. Humans and the greenhouse effect
    • 13.3. Carbon dioxide
    • 13.4. Methane
    • 13.5. Halocarbons
    • 13.6. Nitrous oxide
    • 13.7. Ozone
    • 13.8. Anthropogenic aerosols and climate
    • 13.9. Changing surface conditions
    • 13.10. Climate forcing by humans
    • 13.11. Global warming potential
    • 13.12. Equilibrium climate changes
    • 13.13. Detection and attribution
    • 13.14. Time-dependent climate changes
    • 13.15. Projections of future climate
    • 13.16. Outlook for the future
    • 13.17. Climate intervention: geoengineering the climate of earth
  • Appendix A: Calculation of Insolation Under Current Conditions
  • Appendix B: Symbol Definitions
  • Appendix C: Système International (SI) Units
  • Appendix D: Useful Numerical Values
  • Appendix E: Answers to Selected Exercises
  • Glossary
  • References
  • Subject Index

Details

No. of pages:
498
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier Science 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier Science
eBook ISBN:
9780080918624
Hardcover ISBN:
9780123285317

About the Author

Dennis Hartmann

Professor D.L. Hartmann received his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Portland, and his PhD in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics from Princeton University. After postdoctoral appointments at McGill University and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, he joined the faculty of the University of Washington, where he is currently a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, and Senior Fellow of the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean.

Professor Hartmann’s research interests include dynamics of the atmosphere, atmosphere-ocean interaction, climate feedback processes and climate change. His primary areas of expertise are atmospheric dynamics, radiation and remote sensing, and mathematical and statistical techniques for data analysis.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA