Wound Healing Biomaterials - Volume 2 - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782424567, 9780081006061

Wound Healing Biomaterials - Volume 2

1st Edition

Functional Biomaterials

Editors: Magnus Ågren
eBook ISBN: 9780081006061
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782424567
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 1st June 2016
Page Count: 542
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Description

Wound Healing Biomaterials: Volume Two, Functional Biomaterials discusses the types of wounds associated with trauma, illness, or surgery that can sometimes be extremely complex and difficult to heal. Consequently, there is a prominent drive for scientists and clinicians to find methods to heal wounds opening up a new area of research in biomaterials and the ways they can be applied to the challenges associated with wound care.

Much research is now concerned with new therapies, regeneration methods, and the use of biomaterials that can assist in wound healing and alter healing responses. This book provides readers with a thorough review of the functional biomaterials used for wound healing, with chapters discussing the fundamentals of wound healing biomaterials, films for wound healing applications, polymer-based dressing for wound healing applications, and functional dressings for wound care.

Key Features

  • Includes more systematic and comprehensive coverage on the topic of wound care
  • Provides thorough coverage of all specific therapies and biomaterials for wound healing
  • Contains clear layout and organization that is carefully arranged with clear titles and comprehensive section headings
  • Details specific sections on the fundamentals of wound healing biomaterials, films for wound healing applications, polymer-based dressing for wound healing applications, and more

Readership

Researchers in industry, academia and clinics with an interest in wound healing

Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials
  • Part One. Fundamentals of wound healing biomaterials
    • 1. Introduction to biomaterials for wound healing
      • 1.1. Definition of biomaterial
      • 1.2. Types of biomaterials
      • 1.3. Wound healing
      • 1.4. Biomaterials used for dermal wound healing
      • 1.5. Polysaccharide-based biomaterial
      • 1.6. Protein-based biomaterial
      • 1.7. Nanofiber-based biomaterial
      • 1.8. Marine biomaterial
      • 1.9. Biomaterials with antimicrobial activity
      • 1.10. Biomaterials used for corneal wound healing
      • 1.11. Trends of biomaterials used for wound healing
      • 1.12. Limitations of biomaterials for wound healing applications
      • 1.13. Conclusions
    • 2. Modelling of cell–tissue interactions in skin
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Brief overview of cutaneous wound healing
      • 2.3. Foreign body response
      • 2.4. Modulating cell responses to biomaterials
      • 2.5. Biomaterials for wound healing
      • 2.6. Skin substitutes
      • 2.7. Other uses of skin substitutes
      • 2.8. Stem cells
      • 2.9. Conclusions
    • 3. Biofilms in wounds and wound dressing
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. Infectious disease: microbial biofilm and human health
      • 3.3. Basic microbiology of planktonic and biofilm bacteria
      • 3.4. Biofilms in wounds
      • 3.5. Biofilm-based wound care
      • 3.6. Wound healing biomaterials: features, function, and impact on microbial biofilms
      • 3.7. Topical antibiotic combination treatments based on DNA identification of bacteria
      • 3.8. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing
      • 3.9. Biofilm debridement
      • 3.10. Discussion and future trends
    • 4. The importance of preventing and controlling biofilm in wounds: Biofilm models and nanotechnology in antibiofilm approaches
      • 4.1. Antibiofilm approaches in wound care
      • 4.2. In vitro biofilm models for studying chronic wounds
      • 4.3. Nanotechnology and wound healing
      • 4.4. Futures directions and conclusion
    • 5. Control and treatment of infected wounds
      • 5.1. Background
      • 5.2. Current treatment and prevention of wound infections
  • Part Two. Biomaterial films for wound healing
    • 6. Multilayer films for reducing bleeding and infection
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Polyelectrolyte multilayered films
      • 6.3. Concluding remarks
      • 6.4. Future trends
    • 7. Collagen-based formulations for wound healing applications
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Collagen for wound healing
      • 7.3. Species differences in physicochemical properties of collagen-based formulations
      • 7.4. Collagen-based formulations
      • 7.5. Future trends and new prospects
    • 8. Cyanoacrylate tissue glues for cutaneous wound closure
      • 8.1. Wound closure and its history
      • 8.2. Competing methods for wound closure
      • 8.3. Cyanoacrylate tissue glues and their development for clinical practice
      • 8.4. Clinical trials
      • 8.5. Conclusions and future developments
  • Part Three. Polymer biomaterials and dressings for wound healing
    • 9. Collagens in wound healing
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Collagen family overview
      • 9.3. Collagenopathies
      • 9.4. Collagens in the skin
      • 9.5. Collagens in physiological and pathological wound healing
      • 9.6. Collagenopathies and wound healing
      • 9.7. Collagen-based therapies
      • 9.8. Outlook
    • 10. Microparticulate polymers and hydrogels for wound healing
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Wound management
      • 10.3. Hydrogel- and polymer-based dressings for wound healing
      • 10.4. Natural polymers for wound healing
      • 10.5. Synthetic polymers for wound healing
      • 10.6. Micro- and nanoparticulate delivery systems in wound healing
      • 10.7. Hydrogel/polymer-based wound healing dressings in the market
      • 10.8. Clinical trials and patents related to hydrogel/polymer-based wound dressings
      • 10.9. Accelerating wound healing with active agents: future therapeutic trends
      • 10.10. Advanced PolyHeal™ technology for wound healing
      • 10.11. Conclusion and future perspectives
      • List of abbreviations
    • 11. Engineered hydrogel-based matrices for skin wound healing
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Hydrogels attractiveness and achievements in skin wound healing
      • 11.3. Enhanced processing hydrogels
      • 11.4. Spongy-like hydrogels as advanced matrices for skin wound healing
      • 11.5. Future trends
    • 12. Exploring the role of polyurethane and polyvinyl alcohol foams in wound care
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Polyurethane foams
      • 12.3. Polyvinyl alcohol foams
      • 12.4. Foams for absorbent dressings
      • 12.5. Foams for negative pressure wound therapy
    • 13. Biopolymers as wound healing materials
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Biopolymers as wound healing materials
      • 13.3. Proteins
      • 13.4. Conclusions and future perspectives
    • 14. In situ–formed bioactive hydrogels for delivery of stem cells and biomolecules for wound healing
      • 14.1. Injectable hydrogels
      • 14.2. Stem cell therapy for wound healing
      • 14.3. In situ–formed bioactive hydrogels for wound healing
      • 14.4. Future direction
    • 15. Polystyrene-based wound healing systems
      • 15.1. Background
      • 15.2. Polystyrene as a biomaterial
      • 15.3. Proposed future applications
      • 15.4. Conclusion
      • Abbreviations
    • 16. Silver-doped hydrogels for wound dressings
      • 16.1. Overview of wound dressings
      • 16.2. Wound healing process
      • 16.3. Hydrogels
      • 16.4. Silver
      • 16.5. Mode of action of silver
      • 16.6. Clinical use of silver-doped hydrogels
      • 16.7. Side effects of silver use
      • 16.8. Regulatory Issues
      • 16.9. Future trends in silver-doped hydrogels
      • 16.10. Conclusions
      • Conflicts of interest
    • 17. Keratins in wound healing
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Keratin as a biomaterial
      • 17.3. Activity of applied keratins in wound healing
      • 17.4. Clinical application of keratins in wound healing
      • 17.5. Keratins used in biomaterial research
      • 17.6. Conclusion
  • Part Four. Other functional biomaterial dressingsfor wound healing
    • 18. Activated protein C to treat chronic wounds
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Activated protein C
      • 18.3. Mechanisms of action of APC in wound healing phases
      • 18.4. Patents on APC and wound healing
      • 18.5. APC in the treatment of chronic wounds
      • 18.6. Conclusion
      • 18.7. Commentary on likely future trends
    • 19. Clay minerals for tissue regeneration, repair, and engineering
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Properties and use of clays in health care and therapeutic products
      • 19.3. Clay minerals and drug interactions
      • 19.4. Nanocomposites
      • 19.5. Clay minerals and hemostasis
      • 19.6. Clay minerals and cell interactions
      • 19.7. Clay mineral–based scaffolds
      • 19.8. Final remarks
    • 20. Silver-containing dressings
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Bioburden, critical colonisation and biofilm and antibacterial therapies in wound management
      • 20.3. History of silver use in wound care
      • 20.4. Antimicrobial action of silver
      • 20.5. Silver dressings
      • 20.6. Indications for silver dressings in acute and chronic wound management
      • 20.7. Safety and the use of silver: systemic effects, absorption and argyria
      • 20.8. Clinical and health economic evidence for silver dressings
      • 20.9. Future of silver dressings
      • 20.10. Conclusions
    • 21. Antibacterial effects of titanium dioxide in wounds
      • 21.1. Introduction
      • 21.2. Use of TiO2 against wound infections
      • 21.3. Future trends
    • 22. Bioactive nanofiber dressings for wound healing
      • 22.1. Introduction
      • 22.2. Wound management and preparation
      • 22.3. Phases of wound healing and the healing cascade
      • 22.4. Biomaterials for wound healing
      • 22.5. Nanofiber dressing fabrication
      • 22.6. Drug and cell incorporation strategies
      • 22.7. Applications
      • 22.8. Conclusion
    • 23. Nanofibrous smart bandages for wound care
      • 23.1. Advantages of nanofibers for wound healing applications
      • 23.2. Nanofiber manufacturing systems
      • 23.3. Polymers used to develop nanofibrous wound dressings
      • 23.4. Drug delivery to wound sites using medicated nanofibers
      • 23.5. Conclusions and future directions
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
542
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081006061
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782424567

About the Editor

Magnus Ågren

Magnus S. Ågren is Professor at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, and affiliated to Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Dr. Ågren has worked as senior scientist and manager in both academia and industry with wound healing for 35 years, and has published well over 100 scientific articles. He is also scientific advisor for a number of Scandinavian and international companies in the healthcare sector, and he serves on the editorial boards for a number of biomedical journals. Dr. Ågren is the current president for the European Tissue Repair Society.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Copenhagen Wound Healing Center and Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark