Unconventional Shale Gas Development

Unconventional Shale Gas Development

Lessons Learned

1st Edition - February 23, 2022

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  • Editor: Rouzbeh Moghanloo
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323901857
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323905299

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Description

Unconventional Shale Gas Development: Lessons Learned gives engineers the latest research developments and practical applications in today’s operations. Comprised of both academic and corporate contributors, a balanced critical review on technologies utilized are covered. Environmental topics are presented, including produced water management and sustainable operations in gas systems. Machine learning applications, well integrity and economic challenges are also covered to get the engineer up-to-speed. With its critical elements, case studies, history plot visuals and flow charts, the book delivers a critical reference to get today’s petroleum engineers updated on the latest research and applications surrounding shale gas systems.

Key Features

  • Bridges the gap between the latest research developments and practical applications through case studies and workflow charts
  • Helps readers understand the latest developments from the balanced viewpoint of academic and corporate contributors
  • Considers environmental and sustainable operations in shale gas systems, including produced water management

Readership

Petroleum engineer; reservoir engineer; graduate-level petroleum engineering student; researcher interested in shale gas research

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Field development and asset management
  • Abstract
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Background
  • 1.3 Conventional versus unconventional reservoirs
  • 1.4 Asset management
  • 1.5 Reserves reporting for shale reservoirs
  • 1.6 Future prospects of shale development
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Geological characterization of unconventional shale-gas reservoirs
  • Abstract
  • 2.1 The history of shale gas
  • 2.2 Geological evaluations of shale gas prospects
  • 2.3 Proximate control on accumulation of organic-matter-rich shale
  • 2.4 Definition of shale/mudstone/mudrock
  • 2.5 Depositional environments of organic-matter-rich shale
  • 2.6 Organic geochemistry of gas shale
  • 2.7 Other geological characterizations of successful shale gas plays
  • 2.8 Heterogeneity of shale-gas reservoirs
  • 2.9 Diagenetic impact on shale-gas reservoirs
  • 2.10 Distribution of shale-gas reservoirs worldwide
  • 2.11 Case studies: The Middle Devonian Marcellus Formation and the Appalachian Basin
  • 2.12 Geoenvironmental challenges in the development of shale-gas reservoirs
  • 2.13 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 3. Construction and completion of multifractured horizontal wells
  • Abstract
  • 3.1 Definitions
  • 3.2 Well construction
  • 3.3 The wellbore tubulars
  • 3.4 To rotate or not to rotate: the unconventional well dilemma!
  • 3.5 Casing fatigue in unconventional wells
  • 3.6 An OCTG selection approach for unconventional wells
  • 3.7 Wellbore completion of horizontal unconventional wells
  • 3.8 Environmental aspects of well construction and completion
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Well control challenges in unconventional shale plays
  • Abstract
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Well control in unconventional shale plays
  • 4.3 Well control philosophy
  • 4.4 Well control complications in horizontal wells
  • 4.5 Well control challenges in nonaqueous drilling fluids
  • 4.6 Inclined upward laterals challenges
  • 4.7 Kicks while running casing or liners challenges
  • 4.8 Factors affecting well control practices in horizontal wells
  • 4.9 Lessons learned
  • References
  • Chapter 5. Wellbore/borehole stability in shale formation
  • Abstract
  • 5.1 Overview
  • 5.2 Introduction
  • 5.3 Geomechanical evaluation of well stability in shale formation
  • 5.4 Mud–shale interaction affecting well stability in shale formation
  • 5.5 Well integrity in shale formation
  • 5.6 A case study in Tuscaloosa Marine Shale
  • 5.7 Summary
  • Reference
  • Chapter 6. Advances in formation evaluation of shale systems
  • Abstract
  • 6.1 Overview of challenges in formation evaluation of organic-rich mudrocks
  • 6.2 Advanced formation evaluation in organic-rich mudrocks
  • 6.3 Recap and the way forward
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Advances in interpretation of diagnostic fracture injection tests
  • Abstract
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 The URTeC-2019–123 interpretation procedure
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Fracture diagnostic testing
  • Abstract
  • 8.1 Overview
  • 8.2 Testing types
  • 8.3 Step-rate test
  • 8.4 Pump in/shut-in test
  • 8.5 Pump-in/flow-back test (micro-frac)
  • 8.6 New analysis technique
  • 8.7 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Proppant placement
  • Abstract
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Sediment transport theory and transport mechanisms in noncrosslinked fluids
  • 9.3 Proppant transport in vertical fractures
  • 9.4 Proppant transport in complex fracture networks
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 10. Advances in geomechanical modeling
  • Abstract
  • 10.1 Introduction to rock mechanics at granular mesoscale
  • 10.2 Fracture propagation model
  • 10.3 Mechanical earth modeling
  • 10.4 Casing deformation problems
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Advances in flowback analysis: fracturing water production obeys a simple decline model
  • Abstract
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Methodology
  • 11.3 Water-rate decline during flowback and postflowback
  • 11.4 Harmonic water-rate decline model
  • 11.5 Application and discussions
  • 11.6 Limitations and recommendations
  • 11.7 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Application of molecular dynamics simulations for shale gas systems
  • Abstract
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Basic theory
  • 12.3 Description of kerogen and fluid models
  • 12.4 Water and carbon dioxide
  • 12.5 Hydrocarbons
  • 12.6 Simulation details
  • 12.7 Organic matter models
  • 12.8 Spatial distribution of fluids
  • 12.9 Primary recovery from organic nanopores
  • 12.10 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Wettability modifiers for enhanced oil recovery from tight and shale reservoirs
  • Abstract
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Wettability-alteration agents for shales
  • 13.3 Ketone solvent as a new wettability modifier
  • 13.4 Summary and conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Scale considerations during petrophysical characterization of shales
  • Abstract
  • 14.1 Introduction and background
  • 14.2 Scale dependent SEM properties of shales
  • 14.3 Sample size consideration for MICP of shales
  • 14.4 Scale dependent shale pressure decay permeability
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Challenges associated with lifting and loading in shale gas wellbore systems
  • Abstract
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Multiphase flow fundamentals
  • 15.3 Horizontal well flow assurance studies
  • 15.4 Artificial lift practices in unconventional wells
  • 15.5 Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 16. Production data analysis for shale gas wells
  • Abstract
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Straight line analysis
  • 16.3 Distance of investigation and linear flow parameter
  • 16.4 Material balance equation for shale gas reservoir
  • 16.5 Dynamic drainage volume in the unstimulated shale matrix (tri-linear flow)
  • Reference
  • Chapter 17. Machine learning applications in unconventional shale gas systems
  • Abstract
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Artificial intelligence/machine learning applications on production performance- lessons learned
  • 17.3 Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 18. Experimental evaluation of enhanced oil recovery in unconventional resource plays: a new screening protocol
  • Abstract
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Experimental Huff-n-Puff studies
  • 18.3 New enhanced oil recovery screening experiments
  • 18.4 Screening test example: Eagle Ford experiments
  • 18.5 Microstructural changes
  • 18.6 Discussion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 19. Spatial data analytics for optimum data declustering in shale systems
  • Abstract
  • 19.1 Introduction
  • 19.2 Methodology
  • 19.3 Results and discussions
  • 19.4 Conclusions
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 494
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Gulf Professional Publishing 2022
  • Published: February 23, 2022
  • Imprint: Gulf Professional Publishing
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323901857
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323905299

About the Editor

Rouzbeh Moghanloo

Rouzbeh G. Moghanloo is an associate professor and the graduate liaison for natural gas engineering and management program at the Mewbourne School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Moghanloo has authored or coauthored 120 refereed journal and conference papers covering applied topics such as enhanced oil recovery, geological storage of CO2, and asphaltene deposition and basic research articles on modeling of multiphase flow and particulate flow systems. Previously, he was a technical advisor for several companies. Rouzbeh is a member of several associations, including SPE and ACS. Dr. Moghanloo received his PhD in petroleum engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and his Bachelor and Master of Science degrees both in chemical engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology. Dr. Moghanloo holds three patents and serves as an associate editor for Elsevier’s Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Mewbourne School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering, University of Oklahoma, USA

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