Time and Methods in Environmental Interfaces Modelling - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780444639189, 9780444639233

Time and Methods in Environmental Interfaces Modelling, Volume 29

1st Edition

Personal Insights

Authors: Dragutin Mihailovic Igor Balaž Darko Kapor
eBook ISBN: 9780444639233
Hardcover ISBN: 9780444639189
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 14th November 2016
Page Count: 412
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Table of Contents

  • Developments in Environmental Modelling
  • Dedication
  • Preface
  • Part I: Introduction
    • Chapter 1. Environmental interface: Definition and introductory comments
    • Chapter 2. Advanced theoretician's tools in the modelling of the environmental interface systems
      • 2.1. Modelling Architecture
      • 2.2. Basics of Category Theory
      • 2.3. Basics of Mathematical Theory of General Systems
      • 2.4. Formal Concept Analysis in modelling the Interaction of Living Systems and Their Environments
      • 2.5. Basic Concepts of the Chaos Theory
    • Chapter 3. Approaches and meaning of time in the modelling of the environmental interface systems
      • 3.1. Model Choice
      • 3.2. Continuous Time Versus Discrete Time in Building the Model
      • 3.3. Time in Model Building
    • Chapter 4. Examples of use of the formal complex analysis
      • 4.1. Use of Formal Complex Analysis in the Context of Animals: An Example
      • 4.2. Use of Formal Complex Analysis in Constructing the Subjective Interface Between Biological Systems and Their Environments
  • Part II: Time in Environmental Interfaces Modelling
    • Chapter 5. Time in philosophy and physics
      • 5.1. Time in Philosophy
      • 5.2. Time in Physics
    • Chapter 6. Time in biology
    • Chapter 7. Functional time: Definition and examples
      • 7.1. Mollusk Time Reflex Formation
      • 7.2. Prisoner Time Formation in the Cell
      • 7.3. Functional Time Formation in Process of Biochemical Substance Exchange in Ring of Cells
  • Part III: Use of Different Coupled Maps in the Environmental Interfaces Modelling
    • Chapter 8. Coupled logistic maps in the environmental interfaces modelling
      • 8.1. Coupling of Two Logistic Maps
      • 8.2. An Example of Diffusive Coupling: Interaction of Two Environmental Interfaces on the Earth's Surface
      • 8.3. The Linear Coupling
    • Chapter 9. Logistic difference equation on extended domain
      • 9.1. Logistic Equation on Extended Domain: Mathematical Background
      • 9.2. Logistic Equation on Extended Domain in Coupled Maps Serving the Combined Coupling: A Dynamical Analysis
    • Chapter 10. Generalized logistic equation with affinity: Its use in modelling heterogeneous environmental interfaces
      • 10.1. Generalized Logistic Map With Affinity: Mathematical Background
      • 10.2. Uncertainties in Modelling the Turbulent Energy Exchange Over the Heterogeneous Environmental Interfaces — Schmidt's Paradox
      • 10.3. Use of the Generalized Logistic Equation With Affinity in Modelling the Turbulent Energy Exchange Over the Heterogeneous Environmental Interfaces
    • Chapter 11. Maps serving the different coupling in the environmental interfaces modelling in the presence of noise
      • 11.1. Behavior of a Logistic Map Driven by Fluctuations
      • 11.2. Behavior of the Coupled Maps Serving the Combined Coupling in the Presence of Dynamical Noise
  • Part IV: Heterarchy and Exchange Processes Between Environmental Interfaces
    • Chapter 12. Heterarchy as a concept in environmental interfaces modelling
      • 12.1. Hierarchy and Heterarchy
      • 12.2. Observational Heterarchy and Formalization of Heterarchical Levels
    • Chapter 13. Heterarchy and biochemical substance exchange in a diffusively coupled ring of cells
      • 13.1. Observational Heterarchy and Biochemical Substance Exchange Between Two Cells
      • 13.2. Simulations of Active Coupling in a Multicell System
    • Chapter 14. Heterarchy and albedo of the heterogeneous environmental interfaces in environmental modelling
      • 14.1. Heterarchy and Aggregation of Albedo Over Heterogeneous Environmental Interfaces
      • 14.2. Influence of the Albedo Calculation on the Effective Temperature of the Heterogeneous Grid-Box Consisting of Different Covers
  • Part V: Complexity Measures and Time Series Analysis of the Processes at the Environmental Interfaces
    • Chapter 15. Kolmogorov complexity and the measures based on this complexity
      • 15.1. Introductory Comments About Complexity of Environmental Interface Systems
      • 15.2. In What Extent Kolmogorov Complexity Enlightens the Physical Complexity?
      • 15.3. Novel Measures Based on the Kolmogorov Complexity
      • 15.4. Application to Different Dynamical Systems
    • Chapter 16. Complexity analysis of the ionizing and nonionizing radiation time series
      • 16.1. A Complexity Analysis of 222Rn Concentration Variation in a Cave
      • 16.2. Use of Complexity Analysis in Analyzing the Dependence of 222Rn Concentration Time Series on Indoor Air Temperature and Humidity
      • 16.3. Use of the Kolmogorov Complexity and Its Spectrum in Analysis of the UV-B Radiation Time Series
    • Chapter 17. Complexity analysis of the environmental fluid flow time series
      • 17.1. Complexity Analysis of the Mountain River Flow Time Series
      • 17.2. Randomness Representation in Turbulent Flows with Bed Roughness Elements Using the Kolmogorov Complexity Spectrum
      • 17.3. Application of the Complexity Measures Based on the Kolmogorov Complexity on the Analysis of Different River Flow Regimes
    • Chapter 18. How to face the complexity of climate models?
      • 18.1. Complexity of the Observed Climate Time Series
      • 18.2. Complexity of the Modeled Climate Time Series
  • Part VI: Phenomenon of Chaos in Computing the Environmental Interface Variables
    • Chapter 19. Interrelations between mathematics and environmental sciences
      • 19.1. The Role of Mathematics in Environmental Sciences
      • 19.2. Difference Equations and Occurrence of Chaos in Modelling of Phenomena in the Environmental World
    • Chapter 20. Chaos in modelling the global climate system
      • 20.1. Climate Predictability and Climate Models
      • 20.2. An Example of the Regional Climate Model Application
      • 20.3. Occurrence of Chaos at Environmental Interfaces in Climate Models
    • Chapter 21. Chaos in exchange of vertical turbulent energy fluxes over environmental interfaces in climate models
      • 21.1. Chaos in Computing the Environmental Interface Temperature
      • 21.2. A Dynamic Analysis of Solutions for the Environmental Interface and Deeper Soil Layer Temperatures Represented by the Coupled Difference Equations
    • Chapter 22. Synchronization and stability of the horizontal energy exchange between environmental interfaces in climate models
      • 22.1. Synchronization in Horizontal Energy Exchange Between Environmental Interfaces
      • 22.2. Stability of Horizontal Energy Exchange Between Environmental Interfaces
  • Part VII: Synchronization and Stability of the Biochemical Substance Exchange Between Cells
    • Chapter 23. Environmental interfaces and their stability in biological systems
      • 23.1. Building Blocks of Environmental Interfaces
      • 23.2. Emergence of Functionality
      • 23.3. Functional Stability
    • Chapter 24. Synchronization of the biochemical substance exchange between cells
      • 24.1. A Model Representing Biochemical Substance Exchange Between Cells: Model Formalization
      • 24.2. Synchronization of the Biochemical Substance Exchange Between Cells: Effect of Fluctuations of Environmental Parameters to Behavior of the Model
    • Chapter 25. Complexity and asymptotic stability in the process of biochemical substance exchange in multicell system
      • 25.1. Complexity of the Intercellular Biochemical Substance Exchange
      • 25.2. Asymptotic Stability of the Intercellular Biochemical Substance Exchange
      • 25.3. Biochemical Substance Exchange in a Multicell System
    • Chapter 26. Use of pseudospectra in analyzing the influence of intercellular nanotubes on cell-to-cell communication integrity
      • 26.1. Biological Importance of Tunneling Nanotubes
      • 26.2. Computing the Threshold of the Influence of Intercellular Nanotubes on Cell-To-Cell Communication Integrity
      • 26.3. Analysis of a Simple Deterministic Model of Intercellular Communication
  • Index

Description

Time and Methods in Environmental Interfaces Modelling: Personal Insights considers the use of time in environmental interfaces modeling and introduce new methods, from the global scale (e.g. climate modeling) to the micro scale (e.g. cell and nanotubes modeling), which primarily arise from the personal research insights of the authors.

As the field of environmental science requires the application of new fundamental approaches that can lead to a better understanding of environmental phenomena, this book helps necessitate new approaches in modeling, including category theory, that follow new achievements in physics, mathematics, biology, and chemistry.

Key Features

  • Includes the use of new mathematical tools, such as category theory, mathematical theory of general systems and formal concept analysis, matrix theory tools, stability analysis, and pseudospectra
  • Presents new content related to time in relation to physics and biology
  • Combines the word of an experienced author team with over 35 papers of collective experience

Readership

Environmental scientists, ecologists, Environmental modellers, NGOs, environmental policy makers, researchers


Details

No. of pages:
412
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780444639233
Hardcover ISBN:
9780444639189

About the Authors

Dragutin Mihailovic Author

Dragutin Mihailovic is Professor in Meteorology and Environmental Fluid Mechanics at the University of Novi Sad (Serbia). He received a B.Sc. in Physics at the University of Belgrade, his M.Sc. in Meteorology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia and defended his Ph.D.Thesis in Meteorology at the University of Belgrade. He was the Visiting Professor at University at Albany, The State University of New York at Albany (USA), Visiting Scientist at University of Agriculture, Wageningen (The Netherlands) and Visiting Researcher in the Norwegian Meteorological Institute (Norway). He has more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific papers in the international journals in subjects related to land-atmosphere processes, air pollution modelling and chemical transport models, boundary layer meteorology, physics and modelling of environmental interfaces, modelling of complex biophysical systems, nonlinear dynamics and complexity. He edited five books form environmental fluid mechanics (Taylor & Francis, World Scientific and Nova Science Publishers). He was the member of the Editorial Board of Environmental Modelling and Software (1992-2010) and reviewer in several scientific journals. He was the principal investigator in a FP6 project and several international projects (Colorado State University and several European countries).

Affiliations and Expertise

Faculty of Agriculture, University of Novi Sad, Serbia

Igor Balaž Author

Igor Balaz is Assistant Professor of Biophysics, Physics and Meteorology. He received MSc in biology and PhD in physics of complex systems at the University of Novi Sad. He is currently working within the Serbian national research project on subtopic: “Modelling of biological systems”. His work is mainly focused on modeling spontaneous emergence of innovations in biological evolution. On three occasions he was the visiting researcher at the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Japan where he worked on modeling adaptability of organization of living systems with prof. Yukio-Pegio Gunji. He was also the visiting researcher at University of Rostock, Germany (the Systems Biology and Bioinformatics research group, Institute for Informatics) and at the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany (Bio Systems Analysis Group, Institute of Computer Science). He has over 30 peer-reviewed scientific papers in the international journals and chapters in research monographs.

Affiliations and Expertise

Faculty of Agriculture, University of Novi Sad, Serbia

Darko Kapor Author

Darko Kapor is the retired Professor of Theoretical and Mathematical Physics. He received a B.Sc. in Physics at the University of Novi Sad, his M.Sc. in Theoretical Physics at the University of Belgrade, Serbia and defended his Ph.D.Thesis in Theoretical Physics at the University of Novi Sad. Along with his teaching activities in Physics, he also taught at the multidisciplinary studies of the Center for Meteorology and Environmental Modelling (CMEM ACIMSI) of the University of Novi Sad. His main research interest is the Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, where he was the head of the projects financed by the Ministry for Science of the Republic of Serbia. During the last 20 years, he has developed an interest in the problems of theoretical meteorology and worked with the Meteorology group at the Faculty of Agriculture and Faculty of Sciences. He has more than 120 peer-reviewed scientific papers in the international journals and chapters in research monographs. While preparing his Ph.D.Thesis, he spent several months in French laboratories (Saclay, Orsay, Grenoble) and in 1990/91 he was the Fullbright grantee at the University of California at San Diego. For a long period he cooperated with the members of Theoretical Condensed Matter Group at KFKI MTA, Budapest, Hungary. Prof. Kapor invested a lot of effort in Physics popularization by working with talented pupils and teachers. He was the organizer of Physics problems solving contests for the elementary schools. His experience from this work was important while he coauthored textbooks in Physics for elementary and secondary schools.

Affiliations and Expertise

Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Serbia