The Vitamins - 5th Edition - ISBN: 9780128029657, 9780128029831

The Vitamins

5th Edition

Fundamental Aspects in Nutrition and Health

Authors: Gerald F. Combs, Jr. James P. McClung
eBook ISBN: 9780128029831
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128029657
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 3rd January 2017
Page Count: 628
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Description

The Vitamins: Fundamental Aspects in Nutrition and Health, Fifth Edition, provides the latest coverage of the biochemistry and physiology of vitamins and vitamin-like substances. Health-related themes present insights into the use of vitamins, not only for general nutritional balance, but also as a factor in the prevention and/or treatment of specific health issues, such as overall immunity, inflammatory diseases, obesity, and anemia.

Readers will gain an understanding of the roles vitamins play in gene expression and epigenetics, providing important information on the further development of personalized medical treatments that will also allow them to establish appropriate dietary programs based on individual genetic profiles.

This cohesive, well-organized presentation of each vitamin includes key words, case studies, and coverage of the metabolic functions of appropriate vitamins. The readability of this complex content is highly regarded by students, instructors, researchers, and professionals alike.

Key Features

  • Includes diagnostic trees for vitamin deficiencies to help readers visually understand and recognize signs of specific deficiencies
  • Updated tables and figures throughout serve as quick references and support key takeaways
  • Provides learning aids, such as call-out boxes to increase comprehension and retention of important concepts

Readership

Upper level undergraduate and graduate students studying micronutrients in nutrition programs, researchers in nutrition, food science, pharmacology, endocrinology, public health, and epidemiology; dieticians, clinicians

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • Preface to the Fifth Edition
  • How to Use This Book
  • Part I. Perspectives on the Vitamins in Nutrition
    • Chapter 1. What Is a Vitamin?
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Thinking About Vitamins
      • 2. Vitamin: A Revolutionary Concept
      • 3. An Operating Definition of a Vitamin
      • 4. The Recognized Vitamins
      • 5. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 2. Discovery of the Vitamins
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Emergence of Nutrition as a Science
      • 2. The Process of Discovery in Nutritional Science
      • 3. The Empirical Phase of Vitamin Discovery
      • 4. The Experimental Phase of Vitamin Discovery
      • 5. The Vitamine Theory
      • 6. Elucidation of the Vitamins
      • 7. Vitamin Terminology
      • 8. Other Factors Sometimes Called Vitamins
      • 9. Modern History of the Vitamins
      • 10. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 3. General Properties of Vitamins
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Vitamin Nomenclature
      • 2. Chemical and Physical Properties of the Vitamins
      • 3. Physiological Utilization of the Vitamins
      • 4. Metabolism of the Vitamins
      • 5. Metabolic Functions of the Vitamins
      • 6. Vitamin Bioavailability
      • 7. Vitamin Analysis
      • 8. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 4. Vitamin Deficiency
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Concept of Vitamin Deficiency
      • 2. Clinical Manifestations of Vitamin Deficiencies
      • 3. Causes of Vitamin Deficiencies
      • 4. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 5. Vitamin Needs and Safety
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Dietary Standards for Vitamins
      • 2. Vitamin Allowances for Humans
      • 3. Vitamin Allowances for Animals
      • 4. Uses of Vitamins Above Required Levels
      • 5. Hypervitaminoses
      • 6. Safe Intakes of Vitamins
      • 7. Study Questions and Exercises
  • Part II. Considering the Individual Vitamins
    • Chapter 6. Vitamin A
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Significance of Vitamin A
      • 2. Properties of Vitamin A
      • 3. Sources of Vitamin A
      • 4. Absorption of Vitamin A
      • 5. Transport of Vitamin A
      • 6. Metabolism of Vitamin A
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin A
      • 8. Biomarkers of Vitamin A Status
      • 9. Vitamin A Deficiency
      • 10. Vitamin A in Health and Disease
      • 11. Vitamin A Toxicity
      • 12. Case Studies
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 7. Vitamin D
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Significance of Vitamin D
      • 2. Properties of Vitamin D
      • 3. Sources of Vitamin D
      • 4. Enteric Absorption of Vitamin D
      • 5. Transport of Vitamin D
      • 6. Metabolism of Vitamin D
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin D
      • 8. Biomarkers of Vitamin D Status
      • 9. Vitamin D Deficiency
      • 10. Vitamin D in Health and Disease
      • 11. Vitamin D Toxicity
      • 12. Case Studies
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 8. Vitamin E
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Significance of Vitamin E
      • 2. Properties of Vitamin E
      • 3. Sources of Vitamin E
      • 4. Absorption of Vitamin E
      • 5. Transport of Vitamin E
      • 6. Metabolism of Vitamin E
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin E
      • 8. Biomarkers of Vitamin E Status
      • 9. Vitamin E Deficiency
      • 10. Vitamin E in Health and Disease
      • 11. Vitamin E Toxicity
      • 12. Case Studies
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 9. Vitamin K
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Vitamin K
      • 2. Properties of Vitamin K
      • 3. Sources of Vitamin K
      • 4. Absorption of Vitamin K
      • 5. Transport of Vitamin K
      • 6. Metabolism of Vitamin K
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin K
      • 8. Biomarkers of Vitamin K Status
      • 9. Vitamin K Deficiency
      • 10. Vitamin K Health and Disease
      • 11. Vitamin K Toxicity
      • 12. Case Studies
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 10. Vitamin C
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Vitamin C
      • 2. Properties of Vitamin C
      • 3. Sources of Vitamin C
      • 4. Absorption of Vitamin C
      • 5. Transport of Vitamin C
      • 6. Metabolism of Vitamin C
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin C
      • 8. Biomarkers of Vitamin C Status
      • 9. Vitamin C Deficiency
      • 10. Vitamin C in Health and Disease
      • 11. Vitamin C Toxicity
      • 12. Case Studies
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 11. Thiamin
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Thiamin
      • 2. Properties of Thiamin
      • 3. Sources of Thiamin
      • 4. Absorption of Thiamin
      • 5. Transport of Thiamin
      • 6. Metabolism of Thiamin
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Thiamin
      • 8. Biomarkers of Thiamin Status
      • 9. Thiamin Deficiency
      • 10. Role of Thiamin in Health and Disease
      • 11. Thiamin Toxicity
      • 12. Case Studies
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 12. Riboflavin
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Riboflavin
      • 2. Properties of Riboflavin
      • 3. Sources of Riboflavin
      • 4. Absorption of Riboflavin
      • 5. Transport of Riboflavin
      • 6. Metabolism of Riboflavin
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Riboflavin
      • 8. Biomarkers of Riboflavin Status
      • 9. Riboflavin Deficiency
      • 10. Riboflavin in Health and Disease
      • 11. Riboflavin Toxicity
      • 12. Case Study
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 13. Niacin
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Niacin
      • 2. Properties of Niacin
      • 3. Sources of Niacin
      • 4. Absorption of Niacin
      • 5. Transport of Niacin
      • 6. Metabolism of Niacin
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Niacin
      • 8. Biomarkers of Niacin Status
      • 9. Niacin Deficiency
      • 10. Niacin in Health and Disease
      • 11. Niacin Toxicity
      • 12. Case Study
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 14. Vitamin B6
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Vitamin B6
      • 2. Properties of Vitamin B6
      • 3. Sources of Vitamin B6
      • 4. Absorption of Vitamin B6
      • 5. Transport of Vitamin B6
      • 6. Metabolism of Vitamin B6
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin B6
      • 8. Biomarkers of Vitamin B6 Status
      • 9. Vitamin B6 Deficiency
      • 10. Vitamin B6 in Health and Disease
      • 11. Vitamin B6 Toxicity
      • 12. Case Studies
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 15. Biotin
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Biotin
      • 2. Properties of Biotin
      • 3. Sources of Biotin
      • 4. Absorption of Biotin
      • 5. Transport of Biotin
      • 6. Metabolism of Biotin
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Biotin
      • 8. Biomarkers of Biotin Status
      • 9. Biotin Deficiency
      • 10. Biotin in Health and Disease
      • 11. Biotin Toxicity
      • 12. Case Study
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 16. Pantothenic Acid
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Pantothenic Acid
      • 2. Properties of Pantothenic Acid
      • 3. Sources of Pantothenic Acid
      • 4. Absorption of Pantothenic Acid
      • 5. Transport of Pantothenic Acid
      • 6. Metabolism of Pantothenic Acid
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Pantothenic Acid
      • 8. Biomarkers of Pantothenic Acid Status
      • 9. Pantothenic Acid Deficiency
      • 10. Pantothenic Acid in Health and Disease
      • 11. Pantothenic Acid Toxicity
      • 12. Case Study
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 17. Folate
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. The Significance of Folate
      • 2. Properties of Folate
      • 3. Sources of Folate
      • 4. Absorption of Folate
      • 5. Transport of Folate
      • 6. Metabolism of Folate
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Folate
      • 8. Biomarkers of Folate Status
      • 9. Folate Deficiency
      • 10. Folate in Health and Disease
      • 11. Folate Toxicity
      • 12. Case Study
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 18. Vitamin B12
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Significance of Vitamin B12
      • 2. Properties of Vitamin B12
      • 3. Sources of Vitamin B12
      • 4. Absorption of Vitamin B12
      • 5. Transport of Vitamin B12
      • 6. Metabolism of Vitamin B12
      • 7. Metabolic Functions of Vitamin B12
      • 8. Biomarkers of Vitamin B12 Status
      • 9. Vitamin B12 Deficiency
      • 10. Vitamin B12 in Health and Disease
      • 11. Vitamin B12 Toxicity
      • 12. Case Study
      • 13. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 19. Vitamin-Like Factors
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Is the List of Vitamins Complete?
      • 2. Choline
      • 3. Carnitine
      • 4. Myo-Inositol
      • 5. Ubiquinones
      • 6. Lipoic Acid
      • 7. Nonprovitamin A Carotenoids
      • 8. Flavonoids
      • 9. Orotic Acid
      • 10. Unidentified Factors
      • 11. Case Study
      • 12. Study Questions and Exercises
  • Part III. Using Current Knowledge of the Vitamins
    • Chapter 20. Sources of the Vitamins
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Vitamins in Foods and Feedstuffs
      • 2. Vitamin Bioavailability
      • 3. Vitamin Losses in Foods
      • 4. Vitamin Fortification
      • 5. Biofortification
      • 6. Vitamin Labeling of Foods
      • 7. Vitamins in Human Diets
      • 8. Vitamin Supplementation
      • 9. Vitamins in Livestock Feeding
      • 10. Case Study
      • 11. Study Questions and Exercises
    • Chapter 21. Assessing Vitamin Status
      • Learning Objectives
      • Vocabulary
      • 1. Nutritional Assessment
      • 2. Biomarkers of Vitamin Status
      • 3. Vitamin Status of Human Populations
      • 4. Global Undernutrition
      • 5. Study Questions and Exercises
  • Appendix A. Current and Obsolete Designations of Vitamins (Bolded) and Other Vitamin-Like Factors
  • Appendix B. Original Reports for Case Studies
  • Appendix C. A Core of Current Vitamin Literature
  • Appendix D. Vitamin Contents of Foods (units per 100g Edible Portion)
  • Appendix E. Vitamin Contents of Feedstuffs (units per kg)
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
628
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128029831
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128029657

About the Author

Gerald F. Combs, Jr.

Gerald F. Combs, Jr. is internationally recognized as a leader in Nutrition, having published widely and conducted research ranging from fundamental studies with cultured cells and animal models to human metabolic and clinical investigations. His specialties include the metabolism and health roles of minerals and vitamins, and the linkages of agriculture and human health in national development. He has published more than 300 scientific papers and reviews and 14 books, and is an Emeritus Professor of Nutrition at Cornell University.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor Emeritus, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA

James P. McClung

James P. McClung, Ph.D., is a nutritional biochemist whose past and current research focuses on micronutrient nutrition at both the basic and applied levels. He has expertise in the areas of iron, selenium, and zinc nutrition. Ongoing experiments in his laboratory include studies investigating the impact of poor iron status on health and performance in both humans and animals. Dr. McClung currently serves on the editorial boards of a number of leading nutrition journals, including Advances in Nutrition and the British Journal of Nutrition. He received his B.S. and M.S. from the University of New Hampshire and his Ph.D. from Cornell University.

Affiliations and Expertise

Westborough, Massachusetts, USA

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