The Internet and Its Protocols

The Internet and Its Protocols

A Comparative Approach

1st Edition - April 29, 2004

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  • Author: Adrian Farrel
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9781558609136
  • eBook ISBN: 9780080518879

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Description

The view presented in The Internet and Its Protocols is at once broad and deep. It covers all the common protocols and how they combine to create the Internet in its totality. More importantly, it describes each one completely, examining the requirements it addresses and the exact means by which it does its job. These descriptions include message flows, full message formats, and message exchanges for normal and error operation. They are supported by numerous diagrams and tables.This book's comparative approach gives you something more valuable: insight into the decisions you face as you build and maintain your network, network device, or network application. Author Adrian Farrel’s experience and advice will dramatically smooth your path as you work to offer improved performance and a wider range of services.

Key Features

* Provides comprehensive, in-depth, and comparative coverage of the Internet Protocol (both IPv4 and IPv6) and its many related technologies.
* Written for developers, operators, and managers, and designed to be used as both an overview and a reference.
* Discusses major concepts in traffic engineering, providing detailed looks at MPLS and GMPLS and how they control both IP and non-IP traffic.
* Covers protocols for governing routing and transport, and for managing switches, components, and the network as a whole, along with higher-level application protocols.
* Offers thoughtful guidance on choosing between protocols, selecting features within a protocol, and other service- and performance-related decisions.

Readership

Networking professionals, i.e., applications programmers, hardware/software developers, systems testers, network managers and network operators

Table of Contents

  • 1 OVERVIEW OF ESSENTIALS
    1.1 PHYSICAL CONNECTIVITY
    1.2 PROTOCOLS AND ADDRESSING
    1.3 THE OSI SEVEN LAYER MODEL
    1.4 AN ARCHITECTURE FOR THE NETWORK
    1.5 PACKAGING DATA
    1.6 DATA LINK PROTOCOLS
    1.7 THE PROTOCOLS AT A GLANCE
    1.8 FURTHER READING

    2 THE INTERNET PROTOCOL
    2.1 CHOOSING TO USE IP
    2.2 IPV4
    2.3 IPV4 ADDRESSING
    2.4 IP IN USE
    2.5 IP OPTIONS AND ADVANCED FUNCTIONS
    2.6 INTERNET CONTROL MESSAGE PROTOCOL (ICMP)
    2.7 FURTHER READING

    3 MULTICAST
    3.1 CHOOSING UNICAST OR MULTICAST
    3.2 MULTICAST ADDRESSING AND FORWARDING
    3.3 INTERNET GROUP MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (IGMP)
    3.4FURTHER READING

    4 IP VERSION SIX
    4.1 IPV6 ADDRESSES
    4.2 PACKET FORMATS
    4.3 OPTIONS
    4.4 CHOOSING BETWEEN IPV4 AND IPV6
    4.5 FURTHER READING

    5 ROUTING
    5.1 ROUTING AND FORWARDING
    5.2 DISTRIBUTING ROUTING INFORMATION
    5.3 COMPUTING PATHS
    5.4 ROUTING INFORMATION PROTOCOL (RIP)
    5.5 OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
    5.6 IS-IS
    5.7 CHOOSING BETWEEN IS-IS AND OSPF
    5.8 BORDER GATEWAY PROTOCOL 4 (BGP-4)
    5.9 MULTICAST ROUTING
    5.10 OTHER ROUTING PROTOCOLS
    5.11 FURTHER READING

    6 IP SERVICE MANAGEMENT
    6.1 CHOOSING HOW TO MANAGE SERVICES
    6.2 DIFFERENTIATED SERVICES
    6.3 INTEGRATED SERVICES
    6.4 RESERVING RESOURCES USING RSVP
    6.5 FURTHER READING

    7 TRANSPORT OVER IP
    7.1 WHAT IS A TRANSPORT PROTOCOL?
    7.2 USER DATAGRAM PROTOCOL (UDP)
    7.3 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL (TCP)
    7.4 STREAM CONTROL TRANSMISSION PROTOCOL (SCTP)
    7.5 THE REAL-TIME TRANSPORT PROTOCOL (RTP)
    7.6 FURTHER READING

    8 TRAFFIC ENGINEERING
    8.1 WHAT IS IP TRAFFIC ENGINEERING?
    8.2 EQUAL COST MULTIPATH
    8.3 MODIFYING PATH COSTS
    8.4 ROUTING IP FLOWS
    8.5 SERVICE BASED ROUTING
    8.6 CHOOSING OFFLINE OR DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ENGINEERING
    8.7 DISCOVERING NETWORK UTILIZATION
    8.8 ROUTING EXTENSIONS FOR TRAFFIC ENGINEERING
    8.9 CHOOSING TO USE TRAFFIC ENGINEERING
    8.10 FURTHER READING

    9 MULTIPROTOCOL LABEL SWITCHING
    9.1 LABEL SWITCHING
    9.2 MPLS FUNDAMENTALS
    9.3 SIGNALING PROTOCOLS
    9.4 LABEL DISTRIBUTION PROTOCOL (LDP)
    9.5 TRAFFIC ENGINEERING IN MPLS
    9.6 CR-LDP
    9.7 RSVP-TE
    9.8 CHOOSING BETWEEN CR-LDP AND RSVP-TE
    9.9 PRIORITIZING TRAFFIC IN MPLS
    9.10 BGP-4 AND MPLS
    9.11 FURTHER READING

    10 GENERALIZED MPLS (GMPLS)
    10.1 A HIERARCHY OF MEDIA
    10.2 GENERIC SIGNALING EXTENSIONS FOR GMPLS
    10.3 CHOOSING RSVP-TE OR CR-LDP IN GMPLS
    10.4 GENERALIZED RSVP-TE
    10.5 GENERALIZED CR-LDP
    10.6 HIERARCHIES AND BUNDLES
    10.7 OSPF AND IS-IS IN GMPLS
    10.8 OPTICAL VPNS
    10.9LINK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL
    10.10 FURTHER READING

    11 SWITCHES AND COMPONENTS
    11.1 GENERAL SWITCH MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL
    11.2 SEPARATING IP CONTROL AND FORWARDING
    11.3 LMP-WDM
    11.4 FURTHER READING

    12 APPLICATION PROTOCOLS
    12.1 WHAT IS AN APPLICATION?
    12.2 CHOOSING A TRANSPORT
    12.3 DOMAIN NAME SYSTEM
    12.4 TELNET
    12.5 FILE TRANSFER PROTOCOL
    12.6 HYPER-TEXT TRANSFER PROTOCOL
    12.7 CHOOSING AN APPLICATION PROTOCOL
    12.8 FURTHER READING

    13 NETWORK MANAGEMENT
    13.1 CHOOSING TO MANAGE YOUR NETWORK
    13.2 CHOOSING A CONFIGURATION METHOD
    13.3 THE MANAGEMENT INFORMATION BASE (MIB)
    13.4 THE SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL
    13.5 EXTENSIBLE MARKUP LANGUAGE
    13.6 COMMON OBJECT REQUEST BROKER ARCHITECTURE
    13.7 CHOOSING A CONFIGURATION PROTOCOL
    13.8 CHOOSING TO COLLECT STATISTICS
    13.9 COMMON OPEN POLICY SERVICE PROTOCOL
    13.10 FURTHER READING

    14 CONCEPTS IN IP SECURITY
    14.1 THE NEED FOR SECURITY
    14.2 CHOOSING WHERE TO APPLY SECURITY
    14.3 COMPONENTS OF SECURITY MODELS
    14.5 TRANSPORT LAYER SECURITY
    14.6 SECURING THE HYPERTEXT TRANSFER PROTOCOL
    14.7 HASHING AND ENCRYPTION: ALGORITHMS AND KEYS
    14.8 EXCHANGING KEYS
    14.8.1 Internet Key Exchange
    14.9 FURTHER READING

    15 ADVANCED APPLICATIONS
    15.1 IP ENCAPSULATION
    15.2 VIRTUAL PRIVATE NETWORKS (VPN)
    15.3 MOBILE IP
    15.4 HEADER COMPRESSION
    15.5 VOICE OVER IP
    15.6 IP TELEPHONY
    15.7 IP AND ATM
    15.8 IP OVER DIAL-UP LINKS
    15.9 FURTHER READING

    CONCLUDING REMARKS

Product details

  • No. of pages: 840
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Morgan Kaufmann 2004
  • Published: April 29, 2004
  • Imprint: Morgan Kaufmann
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9781558609136
  • eBook ISBN: 9780080518879

About the Author

Adrian Farrel

Adrian Farrel has nearly two decades of experience designing and developing portable communications software. As MPLS Architect and Development Manager at Data Connection Ltd., he led a team that produced a carrier-class MPLS implementation for customers in the router space. As Director of Protocol Development for Movaz Networks, Inc., he helped build a cutting-edge system that integrated many IP-based protocols to control and manage optical switches. Adrian is active within the IETF, where he is co-chair of the CCAMP working group responsible for GMPLS. He has co-authored and contributed to numerous Internet Drafts and RFCs on MPLS, GMPLS, and related technologies. He was a founding board member of the MPLS Forum, frequently speaks at conferences, and is the author of several white papers on GMPLS.

Affiliations and Expertise

Founder of Old Dog Consulting, North Wales, UK

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