The Future of Agricultural Landscapes, Part III

The Future of Agricultural Landscapes, Part III

1st Edition - November 25, 2021

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  • Editors: David Bohan, Alex Dumbrell
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323915038
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323915045

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Description

The Future of Agricultural Landscapes, Part III, Volume 65 in the Advances in Ecological Research serial, highlights new advances in the field, with this update including contributions from an international board of authors who cover Designing farmer-acceptable rotations that assure ecosystem service provision in the face of climate change, Building a shared vision of the future for multifunctional agricultural landscapes: Lessons from a Long Term Socio-Ecological Research site in south-western France, Vineyard landscapes and biocontrol, Pollinators, Next generation biomonitoring, Diversification of botanical resources in landscapes, Conflict resolution in agricultural landscapes, Addressing the Unanswered Questions in landscape-moderated biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, and more.

Key Features

  • Provides the authority and expertise of leading contributors from an international board of authors
  • Presents the latest release in the Advances in Ecological Research series
  • Updated release includes the latest information on the Future of Agricultural Landscapes

Readership

Environmentalists, ecologists at undergraduate through to research level, social scientists and economists

Table of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Socio-ecosystems and conflict
  • Chapter One: Conflicts between agriculture and biodiversity conservation in Europe: Looking to the future by learning from the past
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Current trends of drivers of biodiversity conflict
  • 3: Existing strategies addressing conflicts between agriculture and biodiversity conservation
  • 4: Emerging approaches and the future of biodiversity conflicts in agriculture
  • 5: Conclusion
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Building a shared vision of the future for multifunctional agricultural landscapes. Lessons from a long term socio-ecological research site in south-western France
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: The LTSER site “Vallées et Coteaux de Gascogne”
  • 3: Drivers of changes in landscape heterogeneity in the VCG
  • 4: Role of landscape heterogeneity for ecosystem services production in VCG
  • 5: Coupling scenarios and modelling to explore the future of VCG landscapes
  • 6: Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Empirical needs
  • Chapter Three: Broadening the scope of empirical studies to answer persistent questions in landscape-moderated effects on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning
  • Abstract
  • 1: Where and why gaps exist in our understanding of landscape-moderated effects on biodiversity and ecosystem function
  • 2: Establishing the distribution and partitioning of diversity and function within the landscape
  • 3: An integrative view of landscape-context
  • 4: Scenarios where testing landscape effects are needed most
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Promoting crop pest control by plant diversification in agricultural landscapes: A conceptual framework for analysing feedback loops between agro-ecological and socio-economic effects
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Conceptual framework and application to wheat systems
  • 3: Discussion and Conclusion
  • References
  • Global change
  • Chapter Five: Designing farmer-acceptable rotations that assure ecosystem service provision in the face of climate change
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: A workflow to co-develop and select agronomically acceptable rotations that meet climate and ecosystem services criteria
  • 3: Understanding farmer attitudes to rotations and adaptation to climate change is foundational to co-designing solutions
  • 4: National patterns of rotation
  • 5: A method for co-developing new rotational scenarios—The future rotations explorer
  • 6: Economic factors of changing crop rotations in arable farming
  • 7: The biodiversity and ecosystem services of arable fields undergoing crop rotation
  • 8: Selecting agronomically, economically and ecologically acceptable future rotations
  • 9: Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter Six: Multiple global change impacts on parasitism and biocontrol services in future agricultural landscapes
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Agricultural intensification
  • 3: Climate change
  • 4: Biological invasion
  • 5: Interactions between drivers and perspectives
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Seven: Harnessing biodiversity and ecosystem services to safeguard multifunctional vineyard landscapes in a global change context
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Exploiting cultivar diversity to mitigate effects of climate change
  • 3: Biological pest control services to limit pesticide use
  • 4: Biodiversity and soil functioning
  • 5: Microbial diversity and wine production
  • 6: Biodiversity as an asset for farm profitability: Costs and prices
  • 7: Cultural ecosystem services in vineyard landscapes
  • 8: Synergies and trade-offs between ecosystem services
  • 9: Conclusions
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • Monitoring
  • Chapter Eight: Effective biodiversity monitoring could be facilitated by networks of simple sensors and a shift to incentivising results
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: The agricultural landscape as a unit of management and conservation
  • 3: Biomonitoring in agricultural landscapes
  • 4: Currently available sensor technologies
  • 5: Essential biodiversity variables (EBVs)
  • 6: Networks of sensors, data processing and analysis
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Nine: Coupling ecological network analysis with high-throughput sequencing-based surveys: Lessons from the next-generation biomonitoring project
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Sampling
  • 3: Biomolecular and bioinformatic treatments in NGB
  • 4: Network reconstruction using inference
  • 5: Network comparison
  • 6: Discussion
  • Acknowledgements
  • References

Product details

  • No. of pages: 454
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: November 25, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323915038
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323915045

About the Editors

David Bohan

Dave Bohan is an agricultural ecologist with an interest in predator-prey regulation interactions. Dave uses a model system of a carabid beetle predator and two agriculturally important prey; slugs and weed seeds. He has shown that carabids find and consume slug prey, within fields, and that this leads to regulation of slug populations and interesting spatial ‘waves’ in slug and carabid density. The carabids also intercept weed seeds shed by weed plants before they enter the soil, and thus carabids can regulate the long-term store of seeds in the seedbank on national scales. What is interesting about this system is that it contains two important regulation ecosystem services delivered by one group of service providers, the carabids. This system therefore integrates, in miniature, many of the problems of interaction between services.

Dave has most recently begun to work with networks. He developed, with colleagues, a learning methodology to build networks from sample date. This has produced the largest, replicated network in agriculture. One of his particular interests is how behaviours and dynamics at the species level, as studied using the carabid-slug-weed system, build across species and their interactions to the dynamics of networks at the ecosystem level.

Affiliations and Expertise

Agricultural Ecologist, UMR 1347 Agroecologie, Dijon, France

Alex Dumbrell

Dr Alex Dumbrell works at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex, UK.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Essex, UK

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