The Development of Expressive Behavior

The Development of Expressive Behavior

Biology-Environment Interactions

1st Edition - March 22, 1985

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  • Editor: Gail Zivin
  • eBook ISBN: 9781483260693

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Description

The Development of Expressive Behavior: Biology-Environment Interactions articulates the aspects of how biology and environment interact in the development of expressive behavior. The book brings together categories in the understanding of expressive behavior and its development. The text delves on issues on the degree and breadth of linkage between states and expressive behaviors; the theoretical and empirical specification of the referent of an expressive behavior; and the methodological choices in studying the phenomenon. Developmental psychologists, ethologists, primatologists, and sociologists will find value in this work.

Table of Contents


  • Contents

    Contributors

    Preface

    I. Issues in Biology-Environment Interactions in Expressive Development

    1. Separating the Issues in the Study of Expressive Development: A Framing Chapter

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    Characteristics of Expressive Behavior Associated with Innateness

    Planes of Biology-Environment Interaction

    Studying Biology-Environment Interactions on the Individual Plane

    Summary

    References

    2. Charles Darwin's Thought on Expressive Mechanisms in Evolution

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    The Medical Approach to Expression

    Darwin's Theories

    Erasmus Darwin's Psychology

    The Evolution of Expression

    Conclusion

    Summary

    References

    3. Consistency and Change in Communication

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    Communication and Formalized Signaling

    Making Distinctions in Signaling and Responding to Signals

    Marked Changes in Signaling Behavior

    Unmarked Changes in Signaling Behavior

    Summary

    References

    4. External Reference and Affective Signaling in Mammalian Vocal Communication

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    External Reference in Nonhuman Mammalian Communication

    Referential Specificity: Roles of Affective and Representational Signals

    Cognitive Implications of Representational Signaling

    Associative Naming versus Representational Symbolism

    Evolutionary Considerations

    Summary

    References

    5. Expression and Negotiation

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    How Complex Are the Factors Affecting the Final Common Path?

    Does the Internal State that Accompanies Signals Persist and Determine the Behavior that Follows?

    Some Further Issues

    Conclusions

    Summary

    References

    6. Experiential Influences on the Development of Expressive Behaviors In Rhesus Monkeys

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    Stimulus Attributes, Age, and Experience

    Form, Social Functions, and Experience

    Responsiveness, Expressive Behaviors, and Experience

    Conclusions

    Summary

    References

    7. Faces as Signs and Symbols

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    Examples of Faces as Signs versus Symbols

    A Structural Analysis of Emotion

    The Development of the State-Expression Relationship

    Socialization Rules: Converting Signs into Symbols

    Summary

    References

    II. Processes of Expressive Development in Humans

    8. Developmental Course of Emotion Expression in the Human Infant

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    Theoretical Considerations

    Developmental Inputs

    Sociocultural Factors

    Developmental Course of the Interplay between Biological and Social Factors in Expressive Behavior

    Summary

    References

    9. Expression as Action: A Motor Perspective of the Transition from Spontaneous to Instrumental Behaviors

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    The Hierarchical Structure of Movement

    What Are the Developmental Coordinative Structures and How Do They Arise?

    How Are Simple Coordinative Structures Assembled into More Complex Movements?

    Rhythmical Stereotypies as Developmental Coordinative Structures

    Expressive Behaviors as Developmental Coordinative Structures

    How Do the Developmental Coordinative Structures Become Connected to Mechanisms of Voluntary Control?

    A Motor Rule in the Transition from Spontaneous to Instrumental Action

    Summary

    References

    10. Coordinative Structures in the Development of Expressive Behavior in Early Infancy

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    Sequential Patterns of Affect Expression: Coordinative Structures

    Further Evidence for Expressive Behavior Sequencing in the First Year of Life

    Theoretical Considerations

    The Role of Evolution in the Development of Expressive Behavior

    Summary

    References

    11. Display Rules and the Socialization of Affective Displays

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    Display Rules

    Infant Preparation for Affective Display Self-Regulation

    Childhood Developmental Self-Regulated Affective Displays

    Display-Rule Knowledge

    Initial Conclusions

    Discussion

    Summary

    References

    12. Emotional Expression, Social Referencing, and Preparedness for Learning in Early Infancy—Mother Knows Best, but Sometimes I Know Better

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    The Concept of Social Referencing: Origins and Applications

    The Application of Social Referencing Theory to Infancy

    Basic Features of Social Referencing

    Dimensions of Social Referencing: A Typology of Social Influence

    Social and Cognitive Skills Needed for Social Referencing

    The Investigation of Social Referencing

    Social Referencing Errors and Preparedness for Learning

    Uncertainty, Preparedness to Learn, and Social Referencing

    Does Social Referencing Occur in Nonhuman Primates?

    Summary

    References

    13. The Development of the Ability to Interpret Emotional Signals—What Is and Is Not Known

    Relationship to Other Chapters and to the Field—ED.

    Introduction

    The Important Issues and Questions

    The Present State of Knowledge

    Problems with the Present Approach

    Suggestions for Research

    When Should Response Capacity Appear?

    Summary

    References

    Author Index

    Subject Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 386
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 1985
  • Published: March 22, 1985
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9781483260693

About the Editor

Gail Zivin

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