Sustainable Horticulture

Sustainable Horticulture

Microbial Inoculants and Stress Interaction

1st Edition - April 21, 2022

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  • Editors: Musa Seymen, Ertan Kurtar, Ceknas Erdinc, Ajay Kumar
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323916769
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323918619

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Description

Sustainable Horticulture: Microbial Inoculants and Stress Interaction gives insights into the applications and formulations of microbial inoculants. In recent years, the optimum yields of horticultural plants largely influenced by rising global temperature, biotic stress (attack of pathogens) and abiotic stresses has created extra pressure for the horticulturalist to meet the need of optimum yield production for the burgeoning global population. However, the challenges of biotic and abiotic stress factors mitigated by traditional physical or chemicals methods include high application cost and adverse impact on quality limit the frequent use, hence the solutions in this book create new avenues for progress. This book covers those challenges and how microbial based bio inoculants are broadly used in horticulture to mitigate the challenges of biotic and abiotic stresses. It provides an important contribution on how to apply efficient beneficial microbes (microbial inoculants) for a sustainable society.

Key Features

  • Provides quality chapters from the leading academician and researchers from the different parts of the world
  • Gives insights on the applications and formulations of microbial inoculants
  • Covers the challenges of biotic and abiotic stress factors mitigated by traditional physical or chemicals methods that are costly

Readership

Scientists (academic and industrial), postgraduate students, research Scholars, PhD students and postdocs, Industry professionals working with microbial technologies

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • List of contributors
  • About the editors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Effects of microbial inoculants on growth, yield, and fruit quality under stress conditions
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Biotic stresses
  • 1.3 Abiotic stresses
  • 1.4 Postharvest fruit storage
  • 1.5 Future perspectives
  • 1.6 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 2. Nutrient availability in temperate fruit species: new approaches in bacteria and mycorrhizae
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Microbial microorganisms
  • 2.3 The role of bacteria in nutrient availability
  • 2.4 The role of mycorrhizae in nutrient availability
  • 2.5 Future perspectives and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3. The effects of microbial inoculants on secondary metabolite production
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Bacteria
  • 3.3 Fungi
  • 3.4 Nematodes
  • 3.5 Viruses
  • 3.6 Protozoa
  • 3.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4. Sustainable stress mitigation with microorganisms in viticulture
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Viticulture under environmental stress
  • 4.3 Interactions between grapevine and beneficial microorganisms
  • 4.4 Microorganism employment for precision viticulture
  • 4.5 Arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis in viticulture
  • 4.6 Plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria in viticulture
  • 4.7 Concluding remarks and future perspectives
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 5. Mitigation of heavy metal toxicity by plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Effects of heavy metals on plants
  • 5.3 Plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria
  • 5.4 Plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria and heavy metal stress
  • 5.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6. Regulatory role of microbial inoculants to induce salt stress tolerance in horticulture crops
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Soil microbes and their abundance in soil
  • 6.3 Origin of salinity and its impact on crops
  • 6.4 Salinity effects on crops
  • 6.5 Benefits and effects of microbial inoculants/plant growth–promoting bacteria to plants’ attributes
  • 6.6 Impact of salinity on soil
  • 6.7 Microbial functional genes that help to alleviate stress tolerance in plants
  • 6.8 Impact of soil salinity on crops
  • 6.9 Regulation of plant response to soil salinity
  • 6.10 Role of microbial phytohormone signaling in conferring salt stress tolerance in plants
  • 6.11 Plants with plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria-associated salinity stress tolerance
  • 6.12 Plant growth–promoting bacteria alleviating plant stress due to soil salinity
  • 6.13 Plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria modulation of salinity stress response genes to induce plant tolerance
  • 6.14 Conclusion and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 7. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in biotic and abiotic stress conditions: function and management in horticulture
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Principles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi symbiosis
  • 7.3 Functions of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in abiotic stress conditions
  • 7.4 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as a biocontrol agent
  • 7.5 Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi technology
  • 7.6 Conclusions and future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 8. Enhancing the physiological and molecular responses of horticultural plants to drought stress through plant growth–promoting rhizobacterias
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Effects of drought stress on plants
  • 8.3 Mechanism of the drought tolerance
  • 8.4 Plant growth–promoting rhizobacteria under drought stress
  • 8.5 Future perspectives and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9. Nanotechnologies for microbial inoculants as biofertilizers in the horticulture
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Characteristics of nanomaterials
  • 9.3 Impact of nanomaterials on plant systems
  • 9.4 Nanotechnology in agriculture
  • 9.5 Nanoformulations for the crops
  • 9.6 Nanotechnology in horticultural systems
  • 9.7 Green nanotechnology
  • 9.8 Conclusion and future perspective
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 10. Use of microbial inoculants against biotic stress in vegetable crops: physiological and molecular aspect
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 10.1 Why do we need methods as alternatives to the usage of pesticides in agriculture?
  • 10.2 Pathogen biocontrol
  • 10.3 Physiological effects of microbial agents on plants
  • 10.4 Use of microbial agents on solanaceae
  • 10.5 Use of microbial agents on cucurbitaceae
  • 10.6 Use of microbial agents on Brassicaceae
  • 10.7 Other vegetables
  • 10.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11. Seed application with microbial inoculants for enhanced plant growth
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 Methods to inoculate microbial applications
  • 11.3 Plant beneficial microorganisms
  • 11.4 Microbial seed applications in agriculture
  • 11.5 Cost-efficient microbial biomass preparations for seed treatments
  • 11.6 Comparison of microbial seed applications with other inoculating methods
  • 11.7 Limitations of microbial seed applications
  • 11.8 Conclusion and future prospective
  • References
  • Chapter 12. Organic waste separation with microbial inoculants as an effective tool for horticulture
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Sorption of polyaromatic hydrocarbons
  • 12.3 Half-lives of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in soils
  • 12.4 Presence of microbial genera/strains in organic waste
  • 12.5 Taxonomical distribution of bacteria in organic waste
  • 12.6 Thermophilic bacteria significance
  • 12.7 Molecular technique to isolate thermophilic bacteria
  • 12.8 Recent advances in characterization of novel metagenome
  • 12.9 Micorbial consortium, an effective tool to degrade polyaromatic hydrocarbons in organic waste via composting
  • 12.10 Microbial consortium (thermophilic or mesophilic), the best option for horticulture crop
  • 12.11 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13. Preharvest and postharvest application of microbial inoculants influencing postharvest storage technology in horticultural crops
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Some relevant preharvest and postharvest factors influencing horticultural crop quality
  • 13.3 Preharvest microbial inoculants, the allies of postharvest management technologies
  • 13.4 Potential of bioinoculants in postharvest horticultural crops protection and preservation
  • 13.5 Postharvest preservation technologies incorporating microbial inoculants or their metabolites
  • 13.6 Conclusion and future prospective
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 14. Nano-based biofertilizers for horticulture
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Fertilizers
  • 14.3 Microbial inoculants as fertilizers
  • 14.4 Types of biofertilizers
  • 14.5 Nanotechnology—strategic potential in sustainable horticulture
  • 14.6 Nanofertilizers—role in improving crop productivity and crop protection
  • 14.7 Nanobiofertilizers—an emerging eco-friendly approach for a smart nutrient delivery system for horticulture
  • 14.8 Advantage of nanobiofertilizers over chemical fertilizers
  • 14.9 Conclusion and future perspective
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 15. Biochemical and molecular effectiveness of Bacillus spp. in disease suppression of horticultural crops
  • Abstract
  • Chapter Outline
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Plant growth promotion by Bacillus spp
  • 15.3 Antagonistic effects of Bacillus species in management of the plant pathogens
  • 15.4 Plant–pathogen–Bacillus interactions
  • 15.5 Future perspectives
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 522
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: April 21, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323916769
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323918619

About the Editors

Musa Seymen

Dr. Musa Seymen is currently working at Selcuk University, Horticulture Department of Agriculture Faculty, Konya/Turkey. Dr. Seymen completed his doctoral research from The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Science of Selcuk University Konya/Turkey. He has published more than seventy research articles and book chapters in leading International and National journals or books. He has a wide area of research experience, especially in the field of Plant-Microbe Interactions, In addition, he has publications in journals such as Agricultural Water Management and Scientia Horticulturae belonging to the world famous Elsevier group. He is also acting as a reviewer in some leading journals. He is still working on research on the effects of beneficial bacteria in vegetables on plant growth and physiology and produces book chapters on the subject

Affiliations and Expertise

Selcuk University, Horticulture Department of Agriculture Faculty, Konya, Turkey

Ertan Kurtar

Dr. Ertan Sait Kurtar is currently working at Selcuk University, Horticulture Department of Agriculture Faculty, Konya/Turkey. Dr. Kurtar completed his doctoral research from The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Science of Çukurova University Adana/Turkey. He has a wide area of research experience, especially in the field of tissue culture (regeneration

Affiliations and Expertise

Selcuk University, Horticulture Department of Agriculture Faculty, Konya, Turkey

Ceknas Erdinc

Dr. Ceknas Erdinc is currently working at Van Yuzuncu Yil University, l Biotechnology Department, Van/Turkey. Dr. Erdinc completed his doctoral research from The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Science of Van Yuzuncu Yil University Van/Turkey. He has published more than seventy research articles and book chapters in leading International and National journals or books. He has wide area of research experience, especially in the field of Microbe Interactions, vegetable breeding, plant physiology and drought and salt stress. In addition, he has publications in journals such as Biochemical Systematics and Ecology and Scientia Horticulturae belonging to the world-famous Elsevier group. He is also acting as a reviewer in some leading journals. He is still working on the effects of PGPR and AMF in vegetables on plant growth and physiology and produces book chapters on the subject

Affiliations and Expertise

Van Yuzuncu Yil University, Agricultural Biotechnology Department of Agriculture Faculty, Turkey

Ajay Kumar

Dr. Ajay Kumar is currently working as visiting scientist in Agriculture Research Organization, Volcani center, RishonLeziyon, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural development Israel. Dr. Kumar completed his doctoral research from Department of Botany, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. He has published more than sixty research articles and book chapters in the leading International and National journals or books. He has wide area of research experience, especially in the field of Plant-Microbe Interactions, Microbial biocontrol, and Endophytes related with the medicinal plants. Recently London Journal Press provide him “Quarterly Franklin Membership" (Membership ID#TM89775) for their significant contribution in the research field. In addition, he is invited member in the editorial committee of “International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences”and “Journal of Plant Science and Agriculture Research. He is also act as reviewer in some leading journals like PLOS ONE, Agriculture, Ecosystem and Environment, Biological Control, Plant Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 3Biotech etc. He has already edited some book with “Elsevier” like “PGPR amelioration in Sustainable agriculture”, “Climate Change and Agriculture Ecosystem”, “Role of Plant growth promoting bacteria in sustainable Agriculture and Nanotechnology”, “Microbial Endophytes: Prospects for Sustainable Agriculture”, “Abatements of Environmental Pollutants” and some are under the production

Affiliations and Expertise

visiting scientist at the Department of Postharvest Science, Agriculture Research Organization, Volcani Center, Rishon LeZion, Israel

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