Space Micropropulsion for Nanosatellites

Space Micropropulsion for Nanosatellites

Progress, Challenges and Future

1st Edition - March 19, 2022

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  • Editor: Kean How Cheah
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128190388
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128190371

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Description

Space Micropropulsion for Nanosatellites: Progress, Challenges and Future features the latest developments and progress, the challenges faced by different researchers, and insights on future micropropulsion systems. Nanosatellites, in particular cubesats, are an effective test bed for new technologies in outer space. However, most of the nanosatellites have no propulsion system, which subsequently limits their maneuverability in space.

Key Features

  • Explains why nanosatellite requirements need unique micro-technologies to help develop a compliant propulsion system
  • Features an overview of nanosatellites and the global nanosatellite market
  • Covers chemical and electric micropropulsion and the latest developments

Readership

Aerospace engineers, Masters’ & PhD students, and researchers, Space propulsion companies and government agencies

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Section 1. Introduction
  • Chapter 1. Emerging of nanosatellites
  • 1.1. Philosophy of micro- and nanosatellites
  • 1.2. The birth of CubeSats
  • 1.3. Launching of CubeSats
  • 1.4. First CubeSats
  • 1.5. CubeSats for scientific missions and commercialization
  • 1.6. CubeSats beyond the Earth
  • 1.7. The need of micropropulsion system
  • Section 2. Chemical micropropulsions
  • Chapter 2. Cold gas microthruster
  • 2.1. Background and principles of operation
  • 2.2. Nozzle theory
  • 2.3. Selection of propellant
  • 2.4. State of the art—system with flight heritage
  • 2.5. Challenges and future
  • Chapter 3. Solid-propellant microthruster
  • 3.1. Introduction
  • 3.2. Solid propellants
  • 3.3. Solid-propellant propulsion fundamentals
  • 3.4. Design of solid-propellant thruster
  • 3.5. Progress in solid-propellant microthruster
  • 3.6. Conclusion and future prospects
  • Chapter 4. Liquid propellant microthrusters
  • 4.1. Historical background and principles of operation
  • 4.2. Liquid propellants
  • 4.3. State-of-the-art liquid propellant microthruster
  • 4.4. Challenges and future
  • Section 3. Electric micropropulsions
  • Chapter 5. Electrothermal microthruster
  • 5.1. Historical background and principle of operation
  • 5.2. Current state of the art of electrothermal micropropulsion
  • 5.3. Selection of propellant for electrothermal microthrusters
  • 5.4. Theoretical analysis of conventional microresistojets
  • 5.5. Conclusion and future challenges
  • Chapter 6. Electrostatic microthrusters
  • 6.1. Background
  • 6.2. Principle of operation
  • 6.3. Selection of propellant
  • 6.4. Current state of the art
  • 6.5. Challenges and future
  • Chapter 7. Electromagnetic microthrusters
  • 7.1. Background
  • 7.2. Thruster types
  • 7.3. Current state of the art
  • 7.4. Challenges and future
  • Section 4. Related development
  • Chapter 8. Thrust measurement
  • 8.1. Thrust stand
  • Chapter 9. Nanoenergetic for micropropulsion
  • 9.1. Introduction
  • 9.2. Combustion equations of nanoenergetic propellant
  • 9.3. Interior ballistic equations of microthruster
  • 9.4. Microthrust balance
  • 9.5. Primary explosive propellant
  • 9.6. Nanothermite propellant
  • 9.7. Conclusion
  • Chapter 10. Solar sail as propellant-less micropropulsion
  • 10.1. Historical background
  • 10.2. Principle of operations
  • 10.3. Solar sail in CubeSat
  • 10.4. Challenges and future
  • Chapter 11. Hydroxylammonium nitrate—the next generation green propellant
  • 11.1. Historical development
  • 11.2. Synthesis of hydroxylammonium nitrate
  • 11.3. Properties and safety evaluation
  • 11.4. Catalytic combustion of HAN
  • 11.5. Challenges and future perspectives
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 328
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: March 19, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128190388
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128190371

About the Editor

Kean How Cheah

Dr. Kean How Cheah is an Assistant Professor at School of Aerospace, University of Nottingham Ningbo China. He received the BEng degree in aerospace from Universiti Sains Malaysia, and the PhD degree in engineering from the University of Nottingham. Prior to joining the university, he held academic positions with Heriot-Watt University Malaysia and Taylor’s University and post-doctoral researcher position with Satellite Research Centre, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, University of Nottingham, Ningbo, China

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