Semiconductor Nanowires - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782422532, 9781782422631

Semiconductor Nanowires

1st Edition

Materials, Synthesis, Characterization and Applications

Editors: J Arbiol Q Xiong
eBook ISBN: 9781782422631
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782422532
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 2nd April 2015
Page Count: 572
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Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials
  • Part One. Semiconductor materials for nanowires
    • 1. II–VI semiconductor nanowires: ZnO
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. Physical properties of ZnO
      • 1.3. Methods for the preparation of 1D ZnO nanostructures
      • 1.4. Applications of 1D ZnO nanostructures
      • 1.5. Conclusion
    • 2. II–VI compound semiconductor nanowires: Optical properties and nanophotonics
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. II–VI semiconductor nanowires synthesis
      • 2.3. Steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy
      • 2.4. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy
      • 2.5. Nanowire waveguides and functional devices
      • 2.6. Nanowire photoluminescence and lasers
      • 2.7. Conclusions and outlook
    • 3. Advanced III–V nanowire growth toward large-scale integration
      • 3.1. Synthesis of III–V NWs
      • 3.2. Crystallographic properties
      • 3.3. Applications of III–V nanowires
      • 3.4. Conclusion
    • 4. III–V semiconductor nanowires: nitrides (N-based; III-N)
      • 4.1. Introduction: the importance of III-nitride alloys
      • 4.2. III-nitride nanowires: brief historical overview
      • 4.3. GaN nanowires
      • 4.4. (In,Ga)N alloy and heterostructure nanowires
      • 4.5. (Al,Ga)N alloy and heterostructure nanowires
      • 4.6. Conclusions
  • Part Two. Characterizing the properties of semiconductor nanowires
    • 5. Self-assembly and organization of nanowires
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Langmuir–Blodgett technique
      • 5.3. Optical trapping method
      • 5.4. Contact printing method
      • 5.5. Electric field-assisted assembly
      • 5.6. Magnetic field-assisted assembly
      • 5.7. Microfluidic assembly
      • 5.8. Chemically driven assembly
      • 5.9. Blown bubble film method
      • 5.10. Conclusions and perspectives
    • 6. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanowires
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Theory and modeling
      • 6.3. Interface-induced correlation effects
      • 6.4. Transport through single ionized impurities
      • 6.5. Impact of phonon scattering
    • 7. Measuring the properties of semiconductor nanowires with transmission electron microscopy
      • 7.1. Sample preparation
      • 7.2. Structural properties
      • 7.3. Morphology
      • 7.4. Compositional analysis
      • 7.5. In situ analysis of properties
      • 7.6. Summary and outlook
    • 8. Electron holography of nanowires – Part 1
      • 8.1. Application details
      • 8.2. Sources of future information and advice
    • 9. Electron holography of nanowires – Part 2
      • 9.1. Introduction to electron holography
      • 9.2. Challenges with 2D samples
      • 9.3. Nanowire sample preparation
      • 9.4. Literature on nanowires
      • 9.5. Off-axis holography of semiconducting NWs
      • 9.6. Conclusion and perspectives
      • 9.7. Further reading
    • 10. Electrical characterization of semiconductor nanowires by scanning-probe microscopy
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Instrumentation
      • 10.3. Exploring the surfaces of semiconductor nanowires at the nanoscale
      • 10.4. Studying transport in semiconductor nanowires
      • 10.5. Conclusion
    • 11. Using atom probe tomography in the study of semiconductor nanowires
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Instrumentation
      • 11.3. Basic principle of APT
      • 11.4. Nanowire sample preparations for atom probe
      • 11.5. Characterization of SiNWs
      • 11.6. Summary and perspectives
    • 12. Optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanowires
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. The characterization of photoelectric properties
      • 12.3. The optoelectronic properties of the NWs
      • 12.4. Conclusions
    • 13. Semiconductor nanowires studied by photocurrent spectroscopy
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Methods
      • 13.3. Photocurrent dynamics in semiconductor nanowires
      • 13.4. Absorption effects in semiconductor nanowires
      • 13.5. Morphologies explored by photocurrent spectroscopy
      • 13.6. Conclusion and future trends
      • 13.7. Sources for further information
    • 14. Cathodoluminescence microanalysis of ZnO nanowires
      • 14.1. Review of the cathodoluminescence technique
      • 14.2. Brief overview of luminescence centres in ZnO
      • 14.3. STEM cathodoluminescence
      • 14.4. Conclusions
  • Part Three. Applications of semiconductor nanowires
    • 15. Semiconductor nanowires for solar cells
      • 15.1. Introduction: photovoltaic conversion for renewable energy
      • 15.2. Solar cell devices and technologies
      • 15.3. Nanowire concept in photovoltaic solar cells
      • 15.4. Nanowire fabrication for photovoltaic devices
      • 15.5. Achievements and perspectives
    • 16. Semiconductor nanowire battery electrodes
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Properties of nanowires for energy storage
      • 16.3. In situ probing on single nanowire
      • 16.4. Nanowire structure
      • 16.5. Conclusions
    • 17. Semiconductor nanowires for biosensors
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Fundamental principle for FET sensors
      • 17.3. Examples of semiconductor nanowire FET sensors
      • 17.4. Methods for enhancing the sensitivity of semiconductor nanowire sensors
      • 17.5. Conclusion
      • 17.6. Future trends
    • 18. Hybrid semiconductor/plasmonic nanowires for nanoscale photonic devices
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Plasmonic nanowire waveguide and plasmon–exciton interaction in plasmonic nanowires
      • 18.3. Coupling between semiconductor nanowires and surface plasmons
      • 18.4. Summary
    • 19. Electrical interfacing of nanowire devices with cells and tissues
      • 19.1. Introduction: interfacing to cellular systems
      • 19.2. Signal transduction mechanism: field-effect transistor-based detection
      • 19.3. Nanowire sensors for extracellular electrical recording
      • 19.4. Nanowire sensors for intracellular electrical recordings
      • 19.5. Future trends
  • Index

Description

Semiconductor nanowires promise to provide the building blocks for a new generation of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. Semiconductor Nanowires: Materials, Synthesis, Characterization and Applications covers advanced materials for nanowires, the growth and synthesis of semiconductor nanowires—including methods such as solution growth, MOVPE, MBE, and self-organization. Characterizing the properties of semiconductor nanowires is covered in chapters describing studies using TEM, SPM, and Raman scattering. Applications of semiconductor nanowires are discussed in chapters focusing on solar cells, battery electrodes, sensors, optoelectronics and biology.

Key Features

  • Explores a selection of advanced materials for semiconductor nanowires
  • Outlines key techniques for the property assessment and characterization of semiconductor nanowires
  • Covers a broad range of applications across a number of fields

Readership

Academics and post-graduate students in physics, chemistry, material science, electrical and electronic engineering and nanoscience, and industry professionals working in the following areas: nanotechnology, NEMS, lithography, photonics, microelectronics, nanoelectronics, semiconductors, sensors, optical materials and devices, biology and nanomaterials.


Details

No. of pages:
572
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782422631
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782422532

About the Editors

J Arbiol Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

ICREA, Spain

Q Xiong Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore