Roadmap to Successful Digital Health Ecosystems

Roadmap to Successful Digital Health Ecosystems

A Global Perspective

1st Edition - February 12, 2022

Write a review

  • Editors: Evelyn Hovenga, Heather Grain
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128234136
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128236390

Purchase options

Purchase options
Available
DRM-free (EPub, PDF)
Sales tax will be calculated at check-out

Institutional Subscription

Free Global Shipping
No minimum order

Description

Roadmap to Successful Digital Health Ecosystems: A Global Perspective presents evidence-based solutions found on adopting open platforms, standard information models, technology neutral data repositories, and computable clinical data and knowledge (ontologies, terminologies, content models, process models, and guidelines), resulting in improved patient, organizational, and global health outcomes. The book helps engaging countries and stakeholders take action and commit to a digital health strategy, create a global environment and processes that will facilitate and induce collaboration, develop processes for monitoring and evaluating national digital health strategies, and enable learnings to be shared in support of WHO’s global strategy for digital health. The book explains different perspectives and local environments for digital health implementation, including data/information and technology governance, secondary data use, need for effective data interpretation, costly adverse events, models of care, HR management, workforce planning, system connectivity, data sharing and linking, small and big data, change management, and future vision. All proposed solutions are based on real-world scientific, social, and political evidence.

Key Features

  • Provides a roadmap, based on examples already in place, to develop and implement digital health systems on a large-scale that are easily reproducible in different environments
  • Addresses World Health Organization (WHO)-identified research gaps associated with the feasibility and effectiveness of various digital health interventions
  • Helps readers improve future decision-making within a digital environment by detailing insights into the complexities of the health system
  • Presents evidence from real-world case studies from multiple countries to discuss new skills that suit new paradigms

Readership

Researchers on medical/health informatics, graduate students, stakeholders involved in digital health system, policy makers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • About the editors and authors
  • Acknowledgements
  • Preface
  • References
  • Foreword
  • Chapter 1: Transforming health care
  • Abstract
  • Issues and challenges
  • What is an ecosystem and how does this apply to digital health?
  • Digital health roadmap development process
  • Existing foundations
  • Global and regional value proposition drivers
  • A digital health enabling environment
  • A national digital health roadmap
  • A future vision
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Global and national infrastructures supporting digital health ecosystems
  • Abstract
  • Digital health foundational needs
  • Digital health ecosystems
  • Current national examples
  • National digital health governance
  • Leading national digital health
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Global collaborative leadership challenges and economic drivers
  • Abstract
  • WHO is leading global digital health reformation
  • Digital health markets and trade
  • Global health security
  • Digital health infrastructures: Research and policies
  • Entities influencing global digital health
  • Infrastructures enabling digital health
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Fragmented global standards development organisations
  • Abstract
  • Why do we need standards?
  • Standards development organisations (SDOs)
  • Health Informatics Standards Development Organisations (SDOs)
  • A standards profiling organisation
  • Communities of practice for digital health
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Standards for digital health, known limitations, and procurement
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Health informatics standards: Focus, purpose, and good practice principles
  • Standards versus standardisation
  • Why use health informatics standards?
  • Standards are not architectures
  • Overlapping or conflicting standards
  • Standards development processes
  • Health informatics standards: A fragmented, political landscape
  • Foundational standards harmonisation
  • How should a procuring organisation use standards today?
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6: The knowledge-driven platform: Strategic technologies for a platform ecosystem approach
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Why a knowledge-driven platform?
  • What is a platform?
  • What does the platform mean for business?
  • Getting there
  • Organisational structure for platform development
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Are professional guidelines and regulatory standards fit for purpose?
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Valuing infrastructure standards and guidelines
  • Key standards and guideline developments
  • Current world reality
  • Guideline development and provider organisations
  • Professional organisations/associations’ knowledge and digital health contributions
  • Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and prevention
  • Patient safety, audits and governance
  • Healthcare accreditation services
  • Regulations/legislation
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Health data standards’ limitations
  • Abstract
  • Digital health ecosystem linkages
  • Leading health data standardisation and interoperability
  • Digital health data science
  • Ontologies and software engineering relationships
  • Clinical content formalisms and expressivity
  • Standards development organizations (SDOs), data standards and data management
  • Clinical content: An ontological framework
  • Data supply chain
  • Data governance and coordination
  • Current issues and limitations
  • Data sharing examples
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Quality data, design, implementation, and governance
  • Abstract
  • Health data
  • Health data supply chain
  • What is quality data?
  • Data access and risk management
  • Quality management responsibilities
  • Data governance needs
  • Clinical governance and data reliance
  • Professional clinical knowledge leadership and governance
  • Health ecosystem governance frameworks
  • Benefits of adopting network and cross-sector collaboration
  • Transforming to optimise the value of this digital era
  • Change management
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Guideline and knowledge management in a digital world
  • Abstract
  • Language and communication: The data, information, knowledge, and wisdom (DIKW) continuum
  • Types of knowledge and knowledge management theories
  • Knowledge discovery and representation
  • Representing concepts using entities, objects, and agent formalisms
  • Bodies of knowledge, ontologies, and frameworks
  • Decision theories and artificial intelligence
  • Tools for knowledge processing
  • Use of knowledge in applications
  • Knowledge governance, validation, and certification
  • Use of global intellectual capital in this digital era
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Modelling clinical knowledge
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Clinical model design
  • Clinical model quality
  • Benefits of a ‘whole of health’ data ecosystem
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Identity—What is in a name?
  • Abstract
  • Names are not enough
  • What is identity?
  • Identity infrastructure
  • Requirements for personal identity
  • Organisations
  • Identification of things
  • Other identification
  • Requirements for successful identity systems
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Electronic health records and essential technology paradigms
  • Abstract
  • Many shades of electronic health records (EHRs)
  • Health data standardisation and interoperability leadership
  • Documentation supporting patient journeys
  • EHR quality evaluation and certification
  • Managing EHR data access
  • Ecosystem data supply chain
  • Secondary data uses—Data supply chains
  • Data Lakes, data hubs, data marts, and data warehouses
  • Discussion and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Health data security and privacy: Challenges and solutions for the future
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgement
  • Introduction
  • Cybersecurity in healthcare
  • Health data use challenges
  • Secure and privacy-preserving solutions
  • Secure and privacy-preserving data use examples
  • Discussion
  • References
  • Chapter 15: The digital needs of genomics resulting from pandemics
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • A model for person-centric and population-centred precision health
  • Biotechnology and computational biology
  • Surveillance
  • The integrated healthcare documentation system and standards
  • Data mining
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning
  • Telehealth and tele-ICU
  • Wrapped in an envelope of privacy and security
  • Challenges and future directions
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Health informatics in the Middle East and North Africa
  • Abstract
  • Diverse nations
  • Health information technology utilisation in the region
  • Digital health innovations and future directions in MENA region
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17: A framework for regional health information systems interoperability: The Asia eHealth Information Network (AeHIN) experience
  • Abstract
  • Background
  • About AeHIN
  • Where are we now: Mind the GAPS
  • Where do we want to go: Fill the GAPS
  • Country experiences
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18: The road to interoperability: openEHR modelling and implementation
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Multilevel modelling paradigm of openEHR
  • Reference model (RM): A stable reference information model constitutes the first level of modelling;
  • openEHR modelling
  • The openEHR-based CDR implementation
  • CDS application based on openEHR CDR
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Evidence-based biomedical information systems: The road ahead
  • Abstract
  • The need for evidence-based systems
  • Norway as a representative of the challenges in European nations
  • Towards next generation EHR: Current challenges and requirements
  • OpenEHR as an open platform ecosystem
  • Open platforms for evidence-based adoption of health information systems
  • Case studies: The co-constructed national approach in Norway
  • Principles for developing an evidence-based open platform ecosystem
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Norway, Sweden, and Finland as forerunners in open ecosystems and openEHR
  • Abstract
  • Historical background and the way to organise healthcare services
  • Evolution of data sharing: From documents to structured openEHR data
  • Benefits of openEHR
  • Country maturity assessment
  • Stepwise approach is characteristic for the openEHR road map in Nordic countries
  • Success factors for a digital ecosystem and openEHR-based projects—A Nordic experience
  • The biggest challenges in the Nordic openEHR projects
  • References
  • Chapter 21: The Brazilian digital health system: Building the digital transformation to engage country citizens
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • The Brazilian healthcare system
  • Information and communication technology in Brazilian healthcare facilities
  • The National Health Data Network (RNDS)
  • Final considerations
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Benefits of using SNOMED CT in the UK National Health Service (NHS)
  • Abstract
  • Why SNOMED CT?
  • The problem … the meaning
  • Use of SNOMED CT in an NHS hospital
  • Clinical coding benefits
  • Benefits for the patient
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Primary health reform for the digital era
  • Abstract
  • Principles of primary care
  • An opportunity for primary care transformation
  • Primary care in Canada
  • Digital health and primary care
  • Digital health in Canada and regulation
  • Comparing digital primary care across Canadian provinces
  • The digital foundation of Ontario’s primary care system
  • Case #1: Adoption of virtual care in Ontario primary care as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Digital health infrastructure as a force shaping the primary care transformation
  • Guiding Canada into the future
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Caribbean/PAHO—Jamaican case study
  • Abstract
  • Background
  • What are the benefits of using OpenEHR?
  • Capacity building and competence in the openEHR reference model
  • Tooling for openEHR adoption
  • Skill development process, use of software, and openEHR tools
  • Design and develop technical documentation for core archetypes
  • Other archetype development activities
  • Further development
  • Investment programme components
  • Capacity building
  • Information architecture
  • Scope
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Addressing workforce knowledge gaps in digital health
  • Abstract
  • A whole of ecosystem approach
  • Defining the vision, then the strategy
  • Identifying new knowledge and skill requirements
  • Building digital health workforce capacity
  • Process, tools, and systems—A human resource (HR) perspective
  • Leading a digital health workforce
  • Performance benefits from leadership and employee engagement
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Emerging digital health ecosystems
  • Abstract
  • A functional EHR environment
  • Defining the vision and then the strategy
  • Implementation strategy
  • Current state and enabling environment—A summary of findings
  • Future directions and purpose
  • Key requirements
  • A timeline to success
  • Our concluding recommendations and rationale
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 610
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: February 12, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128234136
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128236390

About the Editors

Evelyn Hovenga

Evelyn Hovenga, RN, PhD, FACS, FANC, FIAHSI, currently manages eHealth Education, an RTO, and the not-for-profit Global eHealth Collaborative (GeHCo) and continues to work as a digital health consultant. She retired as Professor of Health Informatics in 2007, following a 25-year career in this discipline with a focus on standards development as these apply to EHRs, semantic interoperability, and terminology and is Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Centre for Health Informatics and Multiprofessional Education, University College London (http://www.chime.ucl.ac.uk/). Evelyn started her career as a registered nurse; has health executive, public service, educational and research experience; obtained a PhD in Health Administration (Nursing Informatics); initiated and hosted the first National Health Informatics Conference (HIC) in Melbourne in 1993; is one of the founders of HISA and the Australasian College of Health Informatics; and is a founding fellow of the International Academy of Health Sciences Informatics (FIAHSI), Geneva. She is also widely published. Evelyn is an honorary member of the International Medical Informatics Association’s Nursing Informatics SIG as a result of representing Australian nurses from 1984 for many years, as a member and Past Chair of this group.

Affiliations and Expertise

CEO and Director, eHealth Education Pty Ltd, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Heather Grain

Heather Grain, ADip HIM, Dip TDD, GDip IS, MHI, FAIDH, FMU, FIAHSI, has international expertise in the development, implementation, management, and governance of digital health systems and data, including terminologies and classifications. Heather is a leader of the electronic health record system and information resources design and implementation, having worked in this area in many countries. She is a respected eHealth leader having held leadership roles in health informatics at the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Health Level 7 International or HL7 (the organization responsible for the development of health information exchange standards (computer to computer), and SNOMED International (the organization responsible for clinical terminology development to represent meaning in information systems) and currently leads the Information Governance Ad Hoc Group for ISO TC215. Heather has guided many new people into health informatics as an educator. She has developed and delivered courses for eHealth Education, Melbourne University, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and La Trobe universities, and designed the Electronic Health Records Online Learning (eHRoL) clinical coding simulation and training tool with its associated learning management system for the not-for-profit Global eHealth Collaborative (GeHCo). She understands the practical as well as the theoretical aspects of digital health, having worked with governments, insurers, healthcare organizations, various clinical domains, and researchers. The need for the harmonization of data within systems in healthcare is a key to her philosophy in order to reduce costs and improve outcomes of healthcare systems. She works to develop appropriate skills and education strategies to advance digitally supported healthcare.

Affiliations and Expertise

School of Public Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia

Ratings and Reviews

Write a review

There are currently no reviews for "Roadmap to Successful Digital Health Ecosystems"