Proteomics in Food Science - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128040072, 9780128040577

Proteomics in Food Science

1st Edition

From Farm to Fork

Editors: Michelle Colgrave
eBook ISBN: 9780128040577
Paperback ISBN: 9780128040072
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 5th April 2017
Page Count: 538
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Description

Proteomics in Food Science: From Farm to Fork is a solid reference providing concepts and practical applications of proteomics for those in various disciplines of food science. The book covers a range of methods for elucidating the identity or composition of specific proteins in foods or cells related to food science, from spoilage organisms, to edible components.

A variety of analytical platforms are described, ranging from the usage of simple electrophoresis, to more sophisticated mass spectrometry and bio-informatic platforms. The book is designed for food scientists, technologists, food industry workers, microbiologists, and public health workers, and can also be a valuable reference book for students.

Key Features

  • Includes a variety of analytical platforms, ranging from simple electrophoresis to more sophisticated mass spectrometry and bio-informatic platforms
  • Presents analytical techniques for each food domain, including beverages, meats, dairy and eggs, fruit, fish/seafood, cereals, nuts, and grains that range from sample collection, proportion, and storage analysis
  • Provides applications of proteomics in hot topics area of food safety, including food spoilage, pathogenic organisms, and allergens
  • Covers major pathogens of concern e.g., Salmonella and applications to animal husbandry

Readership

Food scientists, technologists, food industry workers, microbiologists, public health workers

Table of Contents

Section 1. Application to Plants — Cereals, Nuts, Pulses, and Fruits

Chapter 1. Postharvest Proteomics of Perishables

  • 1.1. Introduction
  • 1.2. Factors Affecting Postharvest Quality
  • 1.3. Proteome Level Responses of Perishables to Main Postharvest Abiotic Stresses
  • 1.4. Perspectives

Chapter 2. Proteomics of Rice—Our Most Valuable Food Crop

  • 2.1. Introduction
  • 2.2. Chemical and Physical Principles
  • 2.3. Synopsis of Analytical Techniques
  • 2.4. Proteomic Analysis of Stress Response in Rice
  • 2.5. Conclusions and Future Outlook

Chapter 3. Proteomics as a Tool to Understand Maize Biology and to Improve Maize Crop

  • 3.1. Introduction
  • 3.2. Proteomics of Maize Development
  • 3.3. Stress-Associated Maize Proteomics
  • 3.4. Nutrient Imbalance
  • 3.5. Heterosis-Associated Maize Proteomes
  • 3.6. Seed Viability
  • 3.7. Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Maize
  • 3.8. Maize Allergenic Proteins

Chapter 4. Proteomics of Wheat Flour

  • 4.1. Introduction
  • 4.2. Wheat Flour Proteins
  • 4.3. Wheat Flour Quality
  • 4.4. Immunogenic Potential of Wheat Flour
  • 4.5. Developing Proteomic Maps of Wheat Flour
  • 4.6. The Progression From Descriptive Proteomics to Comparative and Translational Proteomics
  • 4.7. Understanding How the Growth Environment of the Plant Affects Protein Composition of Wheat Flour
  • 4.8. Defining Protein Components of Glutenin Polymer Fractions
  • 4.9. Combining Genetic and Proteomic Approaches to Establish Links Between Specific Proteins and Flour Quality
  • 4.10. Evaluating Immunogenic Potential of Wheat Flour
  • 4.11. Other Proteomic Studies

Chapter 5. Barley Grain Proteomics

  • 5.1. Introduction
  • 5.2. Proteomic Analysis Techniques Used in Analysis of Barley, Barley Malt, and Beer
  • 5.3. Barley Grain and Malting Barley Proteome
  • 5.4. Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Barley
  • 5.5. Beer Proteomics
  • 5.6. Conclusions and Final Remarks

Chapter 6. Proteomics of Soybean Plants

  • 6.1. Introduction
  • 6.2. Soybean Development and Cultivation
  • 6.3. Soybean as a Food Material
  • 6.4. Conclusions

Chapter 7. Proteomics of Hazelnut (Corylus avellana)

  • 7.1. Introduction
  • 7.2. Protein Family Classification and Functional Annotation
  • 7.3. Molecular Characterization and Proteomics
  • 7.4. Hazelnut Allergens
  • 7.5. Detection of “Hidden” Hazelnut Allergens: Proteomic-Based Methods
  • 7.6. Conclusions

Chapter 8. Proteomic as a Tool to Study Fruit Ripening

  • 8.1. Introduction
  • 8.2. Proteomics and Ripening of Climacteric Fruits
  • 8.3. Proteomics and Ripening of Nonclimacteric Fruits
  • 8.4. Commonly Regulated Proteins During Fruit Ripening
  • 8.5. Conclusions and Future Perspectives

Section 2. Application to Farm Animals – Meats, Dairy, and Eggs

Chapter 9. From Farm to Fork: Proteomics in Farm Animal Care and Food Production

  • 9.1. Introduction
  • 9.2. General Aspects
  • 9.3. Animal/Veterinary Aspects
  • 9.4. Production Aspects
  • 9.5. Outlook

Chapter 10. Proteomics of Color in Fresh Muscle Foods

  • 10.1. Introduction
  • 10.2. Proteomics Applied to Meat Color
  • 10.3. Myoglobin Chemistry
  • 10.4. Lipid Oxidation–Induced Myoglobin Oxidation
  • 10.5. Primary Structure of Myoglobins
  • 10.6. Role of Muscle Proteome in Fresh Meat Color
  • 10.7. Conclusions

Chapter 11. Proteomic Investigations of Beef Tenderness

  • 11.1. Introduction
  • 11.2. Proteomics in the Field of Meat Science and Investigations on Beef Tenderness
  • 11.3. Protein Biomarkers of Meat Tenderness
  • 11.4. Protein Biomarkers and Their Role in Determining Beef Tenderness
  • 11.5. Conclusions and Future Prospects

Chapter 12. Protein Modifications in Cooked Pork Products

  • 12.1. Introduction
  • 12.2. Proteomic Studies of Cooked Meat Products
  • 12.3. Spot Identification by MALDI–TOF MS
  • 12.4. Supramolecular Rebuilding of Meat Proteins in Cooked Pork Products
  • 12.5. Conclusions

Chapter 13. Poultry and Rabbit Meat Proteomics

  • 13.1. Introduction
  • 13.2. Poultry Muscle and Meat Proteomics: A Tool to Study Muscle Growth and Allow Breed Differentiation
  • 13.3. Poultry Muscle and Meat Proteomics: A Tool to Study Restraint- and Transport-Derived Stress
  • 13.4. Proteomics and Poultry Meat: The Special Case of Foie Gras
  • 13.5. Rabbit Muscle and Meat Proteomics
  • 13.6. Conclusions and Future Perspectives

Chapter 14. Using Peptidomics to Determine the Authenticity of Processed Meat

  • 14.1. Introduction
  • 14.2. Authenticity Issues
  • 14.3. Protein and Peptide Discrimination
  • 14.4. Analytical Approaches
  • 14.5. Authentication of Processed Meat
  • 14.6. Authentication of Proteins of Nonmeat Origin
  • 14.7. Conclusions

Chapter 15. Proteomic Characterization of Nonenzymatic Modifications Induced in Bovine Milk Following Thermal Treatments

  • 15.1. Introduction
  • 15.2. Single Protein-Centered Characterization of the Modifications Induced by Thermal Treatments
  • 15.3. Proteomic Characterization of the Modifications Induced by Thermal Treatments
  • 15.4. Shotgun Proteomic Characterization of the Modifications Induced by Thermal Treatments
  • 15.5. Conclusions and Future Outlook

Chapter 16. Proteomics of Egg White

  • 16.1. Introduction
  • 16.2. Egg White Proteins in the Preproteomic Era
  • 16.3. Basic Proteomic Studies of Egg White
  • 16.4. Comparative Egg White Proteomics
  • 16.5. Egg White Proteins in Other Egg Compartments
  • 16.6. Proteomics Applied to Posttranslational Modifications of Egg White Proteins
  • 16.7. Proteomic Analysis of Egg White Allergens in Food

Section 3. Application to Aquaculture

Chapter 17. Proteomics in Aquaculture: Quality and Safety

  • 17.1. Proteomics Technologies Applied to Aquaculture
  • 17.2. Proteomics to Evaluate Quality of Aquaculture Species
  • 17.3. Proteomics to Assess the Potential Risks Associated to Aquaculture
  • 17.4. Future Perspectives

Chapter 18. Proteomics to Assess Fish Quality and Bioactivity

  • 18.1. Introduction
  • 18.2. Proteomics to Evaluate Fish Quality
  • 18.3. Proteomics to Evaluate the Bioactivity of Fish
  • 18.4. Conclusions and Final Considerations

Chapter 19. Proteomic Identification of Commercial Fish Species

  • 19.1. Introduction
  • 19.2. Traditional Molecular Strategies for the Identification of Commercial Fish Species
  • 19.3. Proteomic Methodologies for the Identification of Commercial Fish Species
  • 19.4. Conclusions and Future Outlook

Chapter 20. Food Authentication of Seafood Species

  • 20.1. Introduction
  • 20.2. Gel-Based Methods
  • 20.3. MS-Based Methods
  • 20.4. Future Trends

Chapter 21. Proteomic Analysis of Disease in Sydney Rock Oysters

  • 21.1. Introduction
  • 21.2. Proteomic Analysis of Diseases in Oysters
  • 21.3. Case Study—Recent Work in Our Laboratory on Winter Mortality Disease
  • 21.4. Oyster Selective Breeding Programs
  • 21.5. Conclusions and Future Outlook

Section 4. Processed Foods

Chapter 22. Proteomics of Fermented Milk Products

  • 22.1. Introduction
  • 22.2. Qualitative and Quantitative Proteomic Tools Used to Study Milk Fermented Products
  • 22.3. Techno-Functionalities of Dairy Microorganisms Through the Prism of Proteomics
  • 22.4. Peptidomics of Fermented Milk Products
  • 22.5. Probiotics Dairy Microorganisms: How Bacteria Express Their Health Benefits
  • 22.6. Future Challenges

Chapter 23. Proteomic Analysis of Beer

  • 23.1. Introduction
  • 23.2. The Origin of Proteins and Peptides in Beer
  • 23.3. The Characterization of Beer Proteome
  • 23.4. Technological Role of Beer Polypeptides
  • 23.5. Immunological Aspects of Beer Proteins and Peptides

Chapter 24. Proteomics of Grapevines and Wines

  • 24.1. Introduction
  • 24.2. Proteomics Methodologies in Food Products
  • 24.3. Additives in Wine
  • 24.4. Proteomics of Grapevine Berries
  • 24.5. Proteomics of Wine and Other Alcoholic Beverages
  • 24.6. Conclusions

Section 5. Food Spoilage, Pathogenic Organisms and Allergens

Chapter 25. Proteomics of Food Spoilage Pathogens

  • 25.1. Introduction
  • 25.2. MALDI-TOF MS Fingerprinting for Bacterial Identification of Food Spoilage Pathogens
  • 25.3. Foodborne Pathogen Detection by LC-ESI-MS
  • 25.4. Typing of Food Spoilage Pathogens by Proteomics

Chapter 26. Biotyping Meets Proteomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches for Characterization of Microorganisms

  • 26.1. Introduction
  • 26.2. Library-Based Approach
  • 26.3. Proteomics-Based Approaches

Chapter 27. Proteomics Analyses Applied to the Human Foodborne Bacterial Pathogen Campylobacter spp.

  • 27.1. Introduction—An Overview of Campylobacter
  • 27.2. The Adaptive Tolerance Response (ATR) of Campylobacter
  • 27.3. Sample Preparation for Proteomics Analyses
  • 27.4. Subproteomic Approaches for Campylobacter Analysis
  • 27.5. Posttranslational Modifications (PTMs)
  • 27.6. Conclusions

Chapter 28. Proteomic Approaches for Allergen Analysis in Crop Plants

  • 28.1. Introduction
  • 28.2. Allergen Identification in Crop Plants
  • 28.3. Determining the Qualitative and Quantitative Variability of Allergens Among Crop Plants
  • 28.4. Proteomics for the Assessment of Allergenicity in GM Crop Plants
  • 28.5. Conclusions

Chapter 29. Detection of Microbial Toxins by -Omics Methods: A Growing Role of Proteomics

  • 29.1. Introduction—Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Their Toxins
  • 29.2. High-Throughput Technologies for Detection of Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Their Toxins
  • 29.3. Gene Expression Analysis—Transcriptomics, Proteomics
  • 29.4. Proteomics of Food Pathogen Fungi and Mycotoxins
  • 29.5. Marine Biotoxins

Details

No. of pages:
538
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128040577
Paperback ISBN:
9780128040072

About the Editor

Michelle Colgrave

Dr. Michelle L. Colgrave is the Molecular Analysis Team Leader in the CSIRO Agriculture Flagship, based at the Queensland Bioscience Precinct in Brisbane, Australia. She is using mass spectrometry (MS) and proteomics to help identify key proteins that will benefit Australia's livestock and plant industries and improve human health. Dr. Colgrave is working to identify novel proteins and characterise their function and post-translational modifications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Proteomics Research Officer, CSIRO, Queensland, Australia