Product Experience - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780080450896, 9780080556789

Product Experience

1st Edition

Editors: Hendrik N. J. Schifferstein Paul Hekkert
Hardcover ISBN: 9780080450896
eBook ISBN: 9780080556789
Imprint: Elsevier Science
Published Date: 17th December 2007
Page Count: 688
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Description

  • PREFACE
  • LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
  • INTRODUCING PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
    • Theoretical views on product experience
    • Human–product interaction
    • Empirical approaches to studying product experiences
    • An overview of contributing scientific disciplines
  • Part 1: From the Human Perspective
    • A: Senses
      • Chapter 1: ON THE VISUAL APPEARANCE OF OBJECTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 ON VISUAL APPEARANCE
        • 2 THE PHYSICAL WORLD
        • 3 OBJECT APPEARANCE
        • 4 PERCEPTION
        • 5 CONCLUSION
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 2: THE TACTUAL EXPERIENCE OF OBJECTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 THE MEANING OF TOUCH
        • 3 TACTUAL INTERACTION
        • 4 TACTUAL PROPERTIES OF OBJECTS
        • 5 TACTUAL SENSATIONS: BEING TOUCHED BY OBJECTS
        • 6 THE BODY LANGUAGE OF OBJECTS
        • 7 THE FEELINGS INVOLVED IN TACTUAL EXPERIENCE
        • 8 EDUCATING THE TACTUAL SENSES
        • 9 FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS
      • Chapter 3: THE EXPERIENCE OF PRODUCT SOUNDS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 WHETHER TO BE SILENT
        • 2 THE DOMAIN OF PRODUCT SOUNDS
        • 3 SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL STRUCTURE OF SOUNDS
        • 4 PRODUCT SOUNDS
        • 5 PROCESS OF AUDITORY PERCEPTION
        • 7 CONCLUSION
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 4: TASTE, SMELL AND CHEMESTHESIS IN PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 TASTE
        • 3 TASTE: BASIC PHENOMENA OF TASTE EXPERIENCE
        • 4 SMELL
        • 5 SMELL: BASIC PHENOMENA OF EXPERIENCE
        • 6 CHEMESTHESIS
        • 7 MEASURING CHEMOSENSORY PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • 8 CONTEXT, INFORMATION AND EXPECTATIONS IN CHEMOSENSORY AND PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • 9 AGE, GENDER, CULTURAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS IN CHEMOSENSORY AND PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • 10 CONCLUSION
      • Chapter 5: MULTISENSORY PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 COMPARING THE DIFFERENT SENSORY MODALITIES
        • 3 SENSORY IMAGERY
        • 4 ATTENTION SWITCHING BETWEEN THE SENSES
        • 5 CROSS-MODAL CORRESPONDENCES
        • 6 INTERACTIONS BETWEEN VARIOUS SENSORY DOMAINS
        • 7 SENSORY (IN)CONGRUITY
        • 8 SENSORY DOMINANCE
        • 9 CONCLUSIONS AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    • B: Capacities and skills
      • Chapter 6: HUMAN CAPABILITY AND PRODUCT DESIGN
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 USER CHARACTERISTICS
        • 3 PRODUCT DESIGN
        • 4 VISION
        • 5 HEARING
        • 6 INTELLECTUAL FUNCTIONING
        • 7 COMMUNICATION
        • 8 LOCOMOTION
        • 9 REACH AND STRETCH
        • 10 DEXTERITY
        • 11 SUMMARY
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 7: CONNECTING DESIGN WITH COGNITION AT WORK
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 DESIGN AND COGNITION AT WORK: IMPAIRED OR UNIMPAIRED MICRO-COGNITION
        • 3 DESIGN AND COGNITION AT WORK: EXPANDING THE IMPACT OF MACRO-COGNITION
        • 4 CONTRASTING MICRO- AND MACRO-COGNITIVE VIEWPOINTS
        • 5 MACRO-COGNITION AND EXPANSIVE ADAPTATIONS
        • 6 INVENTING THE FUTURE OF COGNITION AT WORK
      • Chapter 8: DESIGNING FOR EXPERTISE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 PERSPECTIVES ON EXPERTISE
        • 3 INNOVATION AND THE EMINENT LEVEL OF EXPERTISE
        • 4 THE IMPLICATIONS OF DIFFERENCES IN USER EXPERTISE FOR PRODUCT DESIGN
        • 5 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
  • Part II: From the Interaction Perspective
    • Chapter 9: HOLISTIC PERSPECTIVES ON THE DESIGN OF EXPERIENCE
      • Publisher Summary
      • 1 INTRODUCTION
      • 2 PERSONAL MEANINGS OF DESIGN PRODUCTS
      • 3 APPLICATION
    • A: The aesthetic experience
      • Chapter 10: PRODUCT AESTHETICS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 ORGANIZATIONAL PROPERTIES
        • 3 MEANINGFUL PROPERTIES
        • 4 UNIVERSAL AESTHETIC PRINCIPLES
        • 5 CULTURAL AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES
        • 6 CONCLUSIONS
      • Chapter 11: AESTHETICS IN INTERACTIVE PRODUCTS: CORRELATES AND CONSEQUENCES OF BEAUTY
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 BEAUTY ‘DEFINED’
        • 3 CORRELATES OF BEAUTY
        • 4 CONSEQUENCES OF BEAUTY
        • 5 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    • B: The experience of meaning
      • Chapter 12: MEANING IN PRODUCT USE: A DESIGN PERSPECTIVE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 MEANING IN PRODUCT USE
        • 2 PRODUCT SEMANTICS
        • 3 AFFORDANCES
        • 4 ANTICIPATING MEANING IN PRODUCT USE
        • 5 USECUES FOR RESEARCH ON PRODUCT USE
        • 6 USECUES IN THE DELFT DESIGN COURSE
        • 7 CONCLUSIONS
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 13: PRODUCT EXPRESSION: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN THE SYMBOLIC AND THE CONCRETE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 THE EXPRESSIVE OBJECT
        • 3 THE CONSTRUCTIVE INDIVIDUAL
        • 4 THE INTERACTIONAL STANCE
        • 5 CONCLUSION
      • Chapter 14: SEMANTICS: MEANINGS AND CONTEXTS OF ARTIFACTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 PRELIMINARIES
        • 2 ARTIFACTS AND THEIR VARIOUS CONTEXTS
        • 3 THREE CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
        • 4 CONCLUSION
    • C: The emotional experience
      • Chapter 15: PRODUCT EMOTION
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 AFFECT AND EMOTION
        • 3 APPROACHES TO PRODUCT EMOTION
        • 4 SOURCES OF PRODUCT EMOTION
      • Chapter 16: CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 SETTING THE STAGE FOR CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • 3 ELICITING CONDITIONS FOR CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • 4 INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN CONSUMPTION EMOTION EXPERIENCE
        • 5 RESEARCH ON CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • 6 IDENTIFYING AND MEASURING CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • 7 FUTURE DIRECTIONS
    • D: Specific experiences and approaches
      • Chapter 17: PRODUCT ATTACHMENT: DESIGN STRATEGIES TO STIMULATE THE EMOTIONAL BONDING TO PRODUCTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 DEFINING PRODUCT ATTACHMENT
        • 2 RELEVANCE OF PRODUCT ATTACHMENT FOR DESIGNERS
        • 3 DETERMINANTS OF PRODUCT ATTACHMENT
        • 4 CONCLUSION
      • Chapter 18: CRUCIAL ELEMENTS OF DESIGNING FOR COMFORT
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 ATTENTION FOR COMFORT IN DESIGN
        • 2 TWO ENTITIES: COMFORT AND DISCOMFORT
        • 3 COMFORT AND DISCOMFORT ASPECTS OF IMPORTANCE FOR DESIGN
        • 4 COMFORT IMPROVEMENT IS POSSIBLE
        • 5 THE CASES
        • 6 CONCLUSION
      • Chapter 19: CO-EXPERIENCE: PRODUCT EXPERIENCE AS SOCIAL INTERACTION
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 FROM USER EXPERIENCE TO CO-EXPERIENCE
        • 2 INTERPRETATIONS OF USER EXPERIENCE IN DESIGN RESEARCH
        • 3 A PHILOSOPHICAL DETOUR
        • 4 CO-EXPERIENCING MOBILE MULTIMEDIA AS A PROCESS
        • 5 MORPHOME: DESIGNING FOR CO-EXPERIENCE WITH PROTOTYPES
        • 6 DISCUSSION
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 20: AFFECTIVE MEANING: THE KANSEI ENGINEERING APPROACH
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 KANSEI AND CHISEI
        • 3 INTRODUCING KANSEI IN COMMERCIAL PRODUCT DESIGN
        • 4 THE KANSEI ENGINEERING APPROACH
        • 5 THE KANSEI IS CHANGING
        • 6 KANSEI ENGINEERING PROCEDURE
        • 7 APPLICATIONS OF KANSEI ENGINEERING IN INDUSTRY
        • 8 REFLECTIONS ON KANSEI ENGINEERING METHODOLOGY
  • Part III: From the Product Persperctive
    • A: Digital products
      • Chapter 21: THE USEFUL INTERFACE EXPERIENCE: THE ROLE AND TRANSFORMATION OF USABILITY
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 USABILITY
        • 2 USABILITY BEYOND SIMPLICITY
        • 3 DIGITAL USER EXPERIENCE DIRECTIONS
        • 4 USABILITY AS AN EVOLVING CONCEPT
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      • Chapter 22: THE EXPERIENCE OF INTELLIGENT PRODUCTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 BACKGROUND
        • 2 UNDERSTANDING INTELLIGENT PRODUCTS
        • 3 INTELLIGENT PRODUCT FUNCTIONALITY AND THE USER
        • 4 USER EXPERIENCE ISSUES
        • 5 EXPERIENCE DRIVEN DESIGN
        • 6 CENTRAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
        • 7 FUTURE
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 23: THE GAME EXPERIENCE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 THE GAME
        • 3 THE PLAYER
    • B: Non-durables
      • Chapter 24: EXPERIENCING FOOD PRODUCTS WITHIN A PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXT
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 PRODUCTS ARE EXPERIENCED DIFFERENTLY IN DIFFERENT CONTEXTS
        • 3 WHICH CONTEXTUAL VARIABLES CONTRIBUTE TO THE PRODUCT EXPERIENCE?
        • 4 DESIGNING PRODUCTS FOR A MEAL CONTEXT
        • 5 HOW TO TEST PRODUCTS TO REFLECT CONSUMER PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
      • Chapter 25: THE MEDIATING EFFECTS OF THE APPEARANCE OF NONDURABLE CONSUMER GOODS AND THEIR PACKAGING ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 APPEARANCE AS A CARRIER OF BRAND EQUITY
        • 2 THE RELATIVITY OF VISUAL PHENOMENA
        • 3 COLOR EXPERIMENTATION IN MARKETING
        • 4 THE INTERACTION OF COLOR AND FLAVOR
        • 5 THE INTERACTION OF SHAPE AND SIZE APPEARANCE
        • 6 A METHOD FOR EMPIRICAL VISUAL RESEARCH
        • 7 CONCLUSION
    • C: Environments
      • Chapter 26: OFFICE EXPERIENCES
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS AND COPING STRATEGIES IN OFFICE ENVIRONMENTS
        • 3 A FRAMEWORK TO UNDERSTAND OFFICE EXPERIENCES
        • 4 DISCUSSION
      • Chapter 27: THE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 THE CHANGING SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
        • 2 FRAMING THE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
        • 3 PERCEIVED VALUE AND SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
        • 4 EMERGENT MARKETING TRENDS AND THE ENGAGED CONSUMER
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • CLOSING REFLECTIONS
  • INDEX

Key Features

Most comprehensive collection of psychological research behind product design and usability Consistenly addresses the 3 components of human-product experience: the human, the product, and the experience *International contributions from experts in the field

Readership

Applications lie mainly in the fields of product development and design, consumer behaviour, and ergonomics. The book is a valuable source of information for academics, product developers, designers, and marketers in industry.

Table of Contents

  • PREFACE
  • LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
  • INTRODUCING PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
    • Theoretical views on product experience
    • Human–product interaction
    • Empirical approaches to studying product experiences
    • An overview of contributing scientific disciplines
  • Part 1: From the Human Perspective
    • A: Senses
      • Chapter 1: ON THE VISUAL APPEARANCE OF OBJECTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 ON VISUAL APPEARANCE
        • 2 THE PHYSICAL WORLD
        • 3 OBJECT APPEARANCE
        • 4 PERCEPTION
        • 5 CONCLUSION
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 2: THE TACTUAL EXPERIENCE OF OBJECTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 THE MEANING OF TOUCH
        • 3 TACTUAL INTERACTION
        • 4 TACTUAL PROPERTIES OF OBJECTS
        • 5 TACTUAL SENSATIONS: BEING TOUCHED BY OBJECTS
        • 6 THE BODY LANGUAGE OF OBJECTS
        • 7 THE FEELINGS INVOLVED IN TACTUAL EXPERIENCE
        • 8 EDUCATING THE TACTUAL SENSES
        • 9 FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS
      • Chapter 3: THE EXPERIENCE OF PRODUCT SOUNDS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 WHETHER TO BE SILENT
        • 2 THE DOMAIN OF PRODUCT SOUNDS
        • 3 SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL STRUCTURE OF SOUNDS
        • 4 PRODUCT SOUNDS
        • 5 PROCESS OF AUDITORY PERCEPTION
        • 7 CONCLUSION
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 4: TASTE, SMELL AND CHEMESTHESIS IN PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 TASTE
        • 3 TASTE: BASIC PHENOMENA OF TASTE EXPERIENCE
        • 4 SMELL
        • 5 SMELL: BASIC PHENOMENA OF EXPERIENCE
        • 6 CHEMESTHESIS
        • 7 MEASURING CHEMOSENSORY PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • 8 CONTEXT, INFORMATION AND EXPECTATIONS IN CHEMOSENSORY AND PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • 9 AGE, GENDER, CULTURAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS IN CHEMOSENSORY AND PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • 10 CONCLUSION
      • Chapter 5: MULTISENSORY PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 COMPARING THE DIFFERENT SENSORY MODALITIES
        • 3 SENSORY IMAGERY
        • 4 ATTENTION SWITCHING BETWEEN THE SENSES
        • 5 CROSS-MODAL CORRESPONDENCES
        • 6 INTERACTIONS BETWEEN VARIOUS SENSORY DOMAINS
        • 7 SENSORY (IN)CONGRUITY
        • 8 SENSORY DOMINANCE
        • 9 CONCLUSIONS AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    • B: Capacities and skills
      • Chapter 6: HUMAN CAPABILITY AND PRODUCT DESIGN
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 USER CHARACTERISTICS
        • 3 PRODUCT DESIGN
        • 4 VISION
        • 5 HEARING
        • 6 INTELLECTUAL FUNCTIONING
        • 7 COMMUNICATION
        • 8 LOCOMOTION
        • 9 REACH AND STRETCH
        • 10 DEXTERITY
        • 11 SUMMARY
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 7: CONNECTING DESIGN WITH COGNITION AT WORK
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 DESIGN AND COGNITION AT WORK: IMPAIRED OR UNIMPAIRED MICRO-COGNITION
        • 3 DESIGN AND COGNITION AT WORK: EXPANDING THE IMPACT OF MACRO-COGNITION
        • 4 CONTRASTING MICRO- AND MACRO-COGNITIVE VIEWPOINTS
        • 5 MACRO-COGNITION AND EXPANSIVE ADAPTATIONS
        • 6 INVENTING THE FUTURE OF COGNITION AT WORK
      • Chapter 8: DESIGNING FOR EXPERTISE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 PERSPECTIVES ON EXPERTISE
        • 3 INNOVATION AND THE EMINENT LEVEL OF EXPERTISE
        • 4 THE IMPLICATIONS OF DIFFERENCES IN USER EXPERTISE FOR PRODUCT DESIGN
        • 5 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
  • Part II: From the Interaction Perspective
    • Chapter 9: HOLISTIC PERSPECTIVES ON THE DESIGN OF EXPERIENCE
      • Publisher Summary
      • 1 INTRODUCTION
      • 2 PERSONAL MEANINGS OF DESIGN PRODUCTS
      • 3 APPLICATION
    • A: The aesthetic experience
      • Chapter 10: PRODUCT AESTHETICS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 ORGANIZATIONAL PROPERTIES
        • 3 MEANINGFUL PROPERTIES
        • 4 UNIVERSAL AESTHETIC PRINCIPLES
        • 5 CULTURAL AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES
        • 6 CONCLUSIONS
      • Chapter 11: AESTHETICS IN INTERACTIVE PRODUCTS: CORRELATES AND CONSEQUENCES OF BEAUTY
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 BEAUTY ‘DEFINED’
        • 3 CORRELATES OF BEAUTY
        • 4 CONSEQUENCES OF BEAUTY
        • 5 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    • B: The experience of meaning
      • Chapter 12: MEANING IN PRODUCT USE: A DESIGN PERSPECTIVE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 MEANING IN PRODUCT USE
        • 2 PRODUCT SEMANTICS
        • 3 AFFORDANCES
        • 4 ANTICIPATING MEANING IN PRODUCT USE
        • 5 USECUES FOR RESEARCH ON PRODUCT USE
        • 6 USECUES IN THE DELFT DESIGN COURSE
        • 7 CONCLUSIONS
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 13: PRODUCT EXPRESSION: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN THE SYMBOLIC AND THE CONCRETE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 THE EXPRESSIVE OBJECT
        • 3 THE CONSTRUCTIVE INDIVIDUAL
        • 4 THE INTERACTIONAL STANCE
        • 5 CONCLUSION
      • Chapter 14: SEMANTICS: MEANINGS AND CONTEXTS OF ARTIFACTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 PRELIMINARIES
        • 2 ARTIFACTS AND THEIR VARIOUS CONTEXTS
        • 3 THREE CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS
        • 4 CONCLUSION
    • C: The emotional experience
      • Chapter 15: PRODUCT EMOTION
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 AFFECT AND EMOTION
        • 3 APPROACHES TO PRODUCT EMOTION
        • 4 SOURCES OF PRODUCT EMOTION
      • Chapter 16: CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 SETTING THE STAGE FOR CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • 3 ELICITING CONDITIONS FOR CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • 4 INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN CONSUMPTION EMOTION EXPERIENCE
        • 5 RESEARCH ON CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • 6 IDENTIFYING AND MEASURING CONSUMPTION EMOTIONS
        • 7 FUTURE DIRECTIONS
    • D: Specific experiences and approaches
      • Chapter 17: PRODUCT ATTACHMENT: DESIGN STRATEGIES TO STIMULATE THE EMOTIONAL BONDING TO PRODUCTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 DEFINING PRODUCT ATTACHMENT
        • 2 RELEVANCE OF PRODUCT ATTACHMENT FOR DESIGNERS
        • 3 DETERMINANTS OF PRODUCT ATTACHMENT
        • 4 CONCLUSION
      • Chapter 18: CRUCIAL ELEMENTS OF DESIGNING FOR COMFORT
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 ATTENTION FOR COMFORT IN DESIGN
        • 2 TWO ENTITIES: COMFORT AND DISCOMFORT
        • 3 COMFORT AND DISCOMFORT ASPECTS OF IMPORTANCE FOR DESIGN
        • 4 COMFORT IMPROVEMENT IS POSSIBLE
        • 5 THE CASES
        • 6 CONCLUSION
      • Chapter 19: CO-EXPERIENCE: PRODUCT EXPERIENCE AS SOCIAL INTERACTION
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 FROM USER EXPERIENCE TO CO-EXPERIENCE
        • 2 INTERPRETATIONS OF USER EXPERIENCE IN DESIGN RESEARCH
        • 3 A PHILOSOPHICAL DETOUR
        • 4 CO-EXPERIENCING MOBILE MULTIMEDIA AS A PROCESS
        • 5 MORPHOME: DESIGNING FOR CO-EXPERIENCE WITH PROTOTYPES
        • 6 DISCUSSION
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 20: AFFECTIVE MEANING: THE KANSEI ENGINEERING APPROACH
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 KANSEI AND CHISEI
        • 3 INTRODUCING KANSEI IN COMMERCIAL PRODUCT DESIGN
        • 4 THE KANSEI ENGINEERING APPROACH
        • 5 THE KANSEI IS CHANGING
        • 6 KANSEI ENGINEERING PROCEDURE
        • 7 APPLICATIONS OF KANSEI ENGINEERING IN INDUSTRY
        • 8 REFLECTIONS ON KANSEI ENGINEERING METHODOLOGY
  • Part III: From the Product Persperctive
    • A: Digital products
      • Chapter 21: THE USEFUL INTERFACE EXPERIENCE: THE ROLE AND TRANSFORMATION OF USABILITY
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 USABILITY
        • 2 USABILITY BEYOND SIMPLICITY
        • 3 DIGITAL USER EXPERIENCE DIRECTIONS
        • 4 USABILITY AS AN EVOLVING CONCEPT
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      • Chapter 22: THE EXPERIENCE OF INTELLIGENT PRODUCTS
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 BACKGROUND
        • 2 UNDERSTANDING INTELLIGENT PRODUCTS
        • 3 INTELLIGENT PRODUCT FUNCTIONALITY AND THE USER
        • 4 USER EXPERIENCE ISSUES
        • 5 EXPERIENCE DRIVEN DESIGN
        • 6 CENTRAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
        • 7 FUTURE
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
      • Chapter 23: THE GAME EXPERIENCE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 THE GAME
        • 3 THE PLAYER
    • B: Non-durables
      • Chapter 24: EXPERIENCING FOOD PRODUCTS WITHIN A PHYSICAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXT
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 PRODUCTS ARE EXPERIENCED DIFFERENTLY IN DIFFERENT CONTEXTS
        • 3 WHICH CONTEXTUAL VARIABLES CONTRIBUTE TO THE PRODUCT EXPERIENCE?
        • 4 DESIGNING PRODUCTS FOR A MEAL CONTEXT
        • 5 HOW TO TEST PRODUCTS TO REFLECT CONSUMER PRODUCT EXPERIENCE
      • Chapter 25: THE MEDIATING EFFECTS OF THE APPEARANCE OF NONDURABLE CONSUMER GOODS AND THEIR PACKAGING ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 APPEARANCE AS A CARRIER OF BRAND EQUITY
        • 2 THE RELATIVITY OF VISUAL PHENOMENA
        • 3 COLOR EXPERIMENTATION IN MARKETING
        • 4 THE INTERACTION OF COLOR AND FLAVOR
        • 5 THE INTERACTION OF SHAPE AND SIZE APPEARANCE
        • 6 A METHOD FOR EMPIRICAL VISUAL RESEARCH
        • 7 CONCLUSION
    • C: Environments
      • Chapter 26: OFFICE EXPERIENCES
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 INTRODUCTION
        • 2 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS AND COPING STRATEGIES IN OFFICE ENVIRONMENTS
        • 3 A FRAMEWORK TO UNDERSTAND OFFICE EXPERIENCES
        • 4 DISCUSSION
      • Chapter 27: THE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
        • Publisher Summary
        • 1 THE CHANGING SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
        • 2 FRAMING THE SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
        • 3 PERCEIVED VALUE AND SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
        • 4 EMERGENT MARKETING TRENDS AND THE ENGAGED CONSUMER
        • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • CLOSING REFLECTIONS
  • INDEX

Details

No. of pages:
688
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier Science 2007
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier Science
eBook ISBN:
9780080556789
Hardcover ISBN:
9780080450896

About the Editor

Hendrik N. J. Schifferstein

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Industrial Design, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Paul Hekkert

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Industrial Design, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands