Photophysics and Nanophysics in Therapeutics

Photophysics and Nanophysics in Therapeutics

1st Edition - April 29, 2022

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  • Editors: Nilesh Mahajan, Avneet Saini, Nishikant Raut, Sanjay Dhoble
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323898393
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323885683

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Description

Photophysics and Nanophysics in Therapeutics explores the latest advances and applications of phototherapy and nanotherapy, covering the application of light, radiation, and nanotechnology in therapeutics, along with the fundamental principles of physics in these areas. Consisting of two parts, the book first features a range of chapters covering phototherapeutics, from the fundamentals of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to applications such as cancer treatment and advances in radiotherapy, applied physics in cancer radiotherapy treatment, and the role of carbon ion beam therapy. Other sections cover nanotherapeutics, potential applications and challenges, and nanotherapy for drug delivery to the brain. Final chapters delve into nanotechnology in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers, the role of nanocarriers for HIV treatment, nanoparticles for rheumatoid arthritis treatment, peptide functionalized nanomaterials as microbial sensors, and theranostic nanoagents.

Key Features

  • Evaluates the latest developments in the fields of phototherapy and nanotherapy
  • Investigates the fundamental physics behind these technologies
  • Explores therapeutic applications across a range of diseases, such as skin disorders, cancer, and neurological conditions
  • Includes case studies that illustrate research in practice
  • Considers challenges and future perspectives

Readership

Biophysicists, biochemists, pharmacologists, researchers and clinicians in medical and pharmaceutical fields, and those working directly with phototherapy and nanotherapy. Graduate, postgraduate and doctoral students working in related fields

Table of Contents

  • Cover Image
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Table of Contents
  • Contributors
  • Section 1 Phototherapeutics
  • Chapter 1 Phototherapy: A critical review
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.2 Background
  • 1.3 Various light sources and methods of phototherapy
  • 1.4 Applications and limitations of phototherapy
  • 1.5 Recent developments and future scopes
  • References
  • Chapter 2 Phototherapy for skin diseases
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Major functions of the skin
  • 2.3 Skin diseases and their etiology
  • 2.4 Bacterial skin diseases
  • 2.5 Fungal skin diseases
  • 2.6 Viral skin diseases
  • 2.7 Tropical ulcers
  • 2.8 HIV related skin diseases
  • 2.9 Pigmentation disorders
  • 2.10 Parasitic infections
  • 2.11 Tumors and cancers
  • 2.12 Trauma
  • 2.13 Skin tests
  • 2.14 Heliotherapy
  • 2.15 Naturopathy modalities on inflammation and immunity
  • 2.16 Phototherapy for skin diseases
  • 2.17 Methods
  • 2.18 Concluding remark
  • Abbreviations
  • References
  • Chapter 3 Phototherapy: The novel emerging treatment for cancer
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Photophysics and photochemistry
  • 3.3 Photodynamic targets at the molecular level
  • 3.4 Light source
  • 3.5 Changes in cell signaling after photodynamic therapy
  • 3.6 Method of excitation for photosensitizing agents
  • 3.7 Photodynamic therapy modifications
  • 3.8 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • Statement of informed consent
  • Conflict of interest
  • References
  • Chapter 4 Fundamentals of photodynamic therapy
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Basic concept of photodynamic therapy
  • 4.3 Working mechanism
  • 4.4 Advantages and disadvantages of photodynamic therapy
  • 4.5 Essential wavelength region in photodynamic therapy
  • 4.6 Recent developments in photodynamic therapy
  • 4.7 Future scopes and perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 5 Photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Background of photodynamic therapy
  • 5.3 Novel strategies in photodynamic therapy
  • 5.4 Role of photosensitizing agents in photodynamic therapy
  • 5.5 Application of photodynamic therapy in treatment of various cancers
  • 5.6 Recent developments, future scope, and challenges
  • 5.7 Conclusion
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 6 Photodiagnostic techniques
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Fundamentals of light used in diagnostic techniques
  • 6.3 Various photo diagnostic techniques
  • 6.4 Physics of photodiagnostic techniques
  • 6.5 Opportunities, challenges, and limitations of photodiagnostic techniques
  • References
  • Chapter 7 The role of physics in modern radiotherapy: Current advances and developments
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Role of radiotherapy in cancer treatment
  • 7.3 Development of radiation physics
  • 7.4 Recent advancement in radiotherapy
  • 7.5 Radiosurgery for noncancerous tumor and diseases
  • 7.6 Summary and conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8 Physics in treatment of cancer radiotherapy
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Principle of radiotherapy
  • 8.3 Traditional facility in treatment of radiotherapy
  • 8.4 Patient preparation and simulation
  • 8.5 Target delineation and treatment planning
  • References
  • Chapter 9 Role of carbon ion beam radiotherapy for cancer treatment
  • 9.1 Introduction
  • 9.2 Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer
  • 9.3 Role of carbon ion beam therapy
  • 9.4 Development of TLD materials for carbon ion beam therapy
  • 9.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Section 2 Nanotherapeutics
  • Chapter 10 Nanomaterials physics: A critical review
  • 10.1 Introduction
  • 10.2 Fundamental concepts of nanomaterial physics
  • 10.3 Properties of materials
  • 10.4 Rationale of nanoparticle physics with diverse functions involving nanomaterials
  • 10.5 Self-assembly of nanostructures
  • 10.6 Clinical applications of nanomaterials physics
  • 10.7 Conclusion: Nanotechnology, physics, and clinical outcome
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 11 Nanotherapeutic systems for drug delivery to brain tumors
  • 11.1 Introduction
  • 11.2 An overview of brain tumors
  • 11.3 Barriers and challenges in the treatment of brain cancer
  • 11.4 Conventional vs nanomedicines in drug delivery for brain cancers
  • 11.5 Approaches and mechanisms of nanocarriers for chemotherapeutic drug delivery to brain tumors
  • 11.6 Types of nanotherapeutic platforms for drug delivery to treat brain cancer
  • 11.7 Novel therapies to treat brain cancers
  • 11.8 Clinical translation of nanotherapeutic systems for brain cancers: From bench to bedside
  • 11.9 Conclusion and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 12 Progress in nanotechnology-based targeted cancer treatment
  • 12.1 Introduction
  • 12.2 Tumor microenvironment: Comparison with normal cells
  • 12.3 Nanotechnology-based diagnosis of cancer
  • 12.4 Nanotechnology-based drug targeting strategies in cancer
  • 12.5 Progress in nanotherapeutics for treating breast and lung cancer
  • 12.6 Future of nanotechnology in cancer treatment
  • 12.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13 Nanotherapeutics for colon cancer
  • 13.1 Introduction
  • 13.2 Diagnosis
  • 13.3 Current therapies
  • 13.4 Nanodrug delivery in cancer therapy
  • 13.5 Polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs)
  • 13.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 14 Nanoparticles for the targeted drug delivery in lung cancer
  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Nanocarriers in LC treatment
  • 14.3 Marketed formulation
  • 14.4 Toxicity issues of inhaled NPS
  • 14.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15 Role of nanocarriers for the effective delivery of anti-HIV drugs
  • 15.1 Introduction
  • 15.2 Conventional antiretroviral therapy
  • 15.3 Types of nanocarriers for antiretroviral drugs delivery
  • 15.4 Nanaotechnological approaches for antiretroviral therapy
  • 15.5 Nanotechnology for improving latency reservoir
  • 15.6 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16 Drug delivery systems for rheumatoid arthritis treatment
  • 16.1 Introduction
  • 16.2 Management of rheumatoid arthritis
  • 16.3 Targeted delivery strategies to inflamed synovium
  • 16.4 Passive targeting
  • 16.5 Active targeting
  • 16.6 Factors for the selection of delivery system
  • 16.7 Drug delivery vehicles for rheumatoid arthritis
  • 16.8 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17 Peptide functionalized nanomaterials as microbial sensors
  • 17.1 Introduction
  • 17.2 Conventional techniques for microorganism detection
  • 17.3 Principle behind using biosensors for microorganism detection
  • 17.4 Commonly used biosensing recognition elements
  • 17.5 Advantages and challenges of using peptide-based detection of microorganisms
  • 17.6 Properties of nanomaterials making them suitable for construction of microbial sensors
  • 17.7 Techniques enabling microorganism detection
  • 17.8 Recent advances in on-site detection of microorganisms using peptide functionalized nanosensors
  • 17.9 Conclusion and future perspectives
  • Uncited references
  • References
  • Chapter 18 Theranostic nanoagents: future of personalized nanomedicine
  • 18.1 Introduction
  • 18.2 Recent approaches versus theranostic nanoagents
  • 18.3 Nanotheranostics and neurological disorders
  • 18.4 Nanotheranostics and rheumatoid arthritis
  • 18.5 Nanoparticle-based theranostic agents
  • 18.6 Theranostic nanoagents: future of nanomedicine
  • 18.7 Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 19 Improving the functionality of a nanomaterial by biological probes
  • 19.1 Introduction to nanomaterials
  • 19.2 Classifications of nanoparticles
  • 19.3 Common conjugation approaches for biomolecule functionalized nanomaterials
  • 19.4 Basic chemistries behind conjugation approaches
  • 19.5 Applications
  • 19.6 Conclusion and future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 20 Nanostructures for the efficient oral delivery of chemotherapeutic agents
  • 20.1 Introduction
  • 20.2 Nanodrug carriers
  • References
  • Chapter 21 Photo-triggered theranostics nanomaterials: Development and challenges in cancer treatment
  • 21.1 Introduction of nanomaterials in phototherapeutics
  • 21.2 Types of nanomaterials
  • 21.3 Polymeric nanocarriers for photosensitizer/dye encapsulation
  • 21.4 Nanoconstructs for photodynamic therapy
  • 21.5 Photo-triggered theranostic nanocarriers
  • 21.6 Approaches to measure drug release through theranostic nanomedicine
  • 21.7 Magnetic resonance imaging for monitoring release of drug
  • 21.8 Photo-triggered theranostics nanomaterials: Principle and applications
  • 21.9 Opportunities and limitations of nanomaterials
  • 21.10 Preclinical challenges
  • 21.11 Future aspects of nanomaterials in the therapeutics
  • References
  • Chapter 22 Nanocrystals in the drug delivery system
  • 22.1 Introduction to nanocrystals and nanosuspension
  • 22.2 Production methods and technology of nanocrystals
  • 22.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of nanocrystals
  • 22.4 Pharmaceutical Nanocrystals of API
  • 22.5 Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 476
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier Science 2022
  • Published: April 29, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier Science
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323898393
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323885683

About the Editors

Nilesh Mahajan

Dr. Nilesh M. Mahajan is a Professor and Head, Department of Pharmaceutics at Dadasaheb Balpande College of Pharmacy, Nagpur, India having 20 years of experience. He has four patents published, one copyright for designing biomedical device, and several publications. He has several research grants from different federal agencies. He is a consultant to Pharma industries and received several awards. His areas of research expertise are nanotherapeutics, crystal engineering, and polyherbal formulations.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor and Head of Department of Pharmaceutics, Dadasaheb Balpande College of Pharmacy, Besa, Nagpur, India

Avneet Saini

Dr. Avneet Saini is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biophysics, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India holding M.Sc. Honours degree and PhD in Biophysics from Panjab University, Chandigarh, India. During her research career, she worked on the computational study and characterization of peptides and peptoids as antimicrobial and collagen mimetics using different in silico techniques. She holds expertise in computational biology and biophysical chemistry techniques. Dr. Saini has received numerous research grants from national and international federal agencies.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Biophysics, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India

Nishikant Raut

Dr. Nishikant A. Raut is a Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Nagpur, India having 19 years of experience. He completed his master’s degree in Pharmaceutical Chemistry in 2002, and received Ph.D. degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences from RTM Nagpur University, Nagpur in 2010. He pursued Post-Doctoral Research from College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA under Raman Post-Doctoral Fellowship awarded by UGC, Govt. of India. He has received research grants from several federal funding agencies. During COVID-19 Pandemic, Dr. Raut, in the capacity of Co-PI, established and served as Nodal Officer of COVID-19 Diagnosis Centre at RTM Nagpur University.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagpur University, Nagpur, India

Sanjay Dhoble

Prof. Sanjay J. Dhoble is presently working as a professor in the Department of Physics at R.T.M. Nagpur University, Nagpur, India. During his research career, he has worked on the synthesis and characterization of solid-state lighting materials, as well as the development of radiation dosimetry phosphors using thermoluminescence techniques and utilization of fly ash. Dr. Dhoble has more than 780 research publications in international and national peer-reviewed journals, more than 582 research papers are published in Scopus-indexed journals. Dr. Dhoble is an Editor of the journal Luminescence.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Department of Physics, R.T.M. Nagpur University, Nagpur, India

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