Pest Control Strategies - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780126504507, 9780323154734

Pest Control Strategies

1st Edition

Editors: Edward H. Smith
eBook ISBN: 9780323154734
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 28th March 1978
Page Count: 350
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Description

Pest Control Strategies is a compilation of papers presented at the symposium held at Cornell University in June 1977. It covers various aspects and issues on pest control. It also discusses the risks and benefits of using pesticides on human health as well as on the economy and environment. Composed of four parts, the book provides an overview of the various alternative pest control techniques and identifies possible solutions on crop pest problems. Part 1 discusses the role of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the integrated pest management programs and policy. The following part discusses the complexity of pest management in terms of socioeconomic and legal aspects. Part 3 presents the different case studies about pest management. These case studies include the potentials for research and implementation of integrated pest management on deciduous tree-fruits and other agricultural crops. The last part of this collection describes the current status, needs, and future developments of integrated pest management.
This book will be relevant to extension leaders, educators, government officials, and agriculturists as well as to students, teachers, and researchers who are interested in the integrated pest management program.

Table of Contents


Contributors

Preface

Acknowledgments

I Introduction

Pest Control—A Perspective

Text

References

The Role of USDA in Integrated Pest Management

Key Considerations of Integrated Systems

USDA Policy on Pest Management

Research, Development, Education, Regulatory, and Action Programs

New Initiatives

Summary and Conclusion

Discussion

II Complexity of Pest Management

Integrated Pest Management—A Biological Viewpoint

Text

References

Discussion

History and Complexity of Integrated Pest Management

Evolution of Pest Control Practices

Early Advocates of an Ecological Approach to Pest Control

Early Pest Management for the Cotton Boll Weevil

Shift to Dependence on Chemicals

Impact of Organic Pesticides

Return to Ecological Approaches

References

Discussion

Socioeconomic and Legal Aspects of Pest Control

Introduction

Socioeconomic Aspects of Pests and Pest Control

Legal Aspects of Pest Control

Conclusion

References

Discussion

A Look at U.S. Agriculture in 2000

Analytic Background

Agriculture in 2000

Implication for Integrated Pest Management

Discussion

III Case Studies of Pest Management

Alfalfa Weevil Pest Management System for Alfalfa

Introduction

Alfalfa Weevil Biology

Control Methods Available

Purpose of Alfalfa Weevil Pest Management

Standardization and Improvement of Research Techniques

Adult Alfalfa Weevil Sampling

Collection of Field Samples for Life Table Construction

Quantitative Biology Studies

Mortality Factors Affecting B. curculionis

Economic Thresholds and Compensation of Alfalfa to Insect Damage

Practical Achievements toward Improved Weevil Control

How to Use the Program

Summary

References

Discussion

Potentials for Research and Implementation of Integrated Pest Management on Deciduous Tree-Fruits

Historical Trends in Apple Pest Control

Components of an IPM System

Plant-Feeding Mites

The Codling Moth

A Multiple-Species Extension Timing System for Apple IPM

Other Alternative Strategies for Apple Pest Control

Integration of Apple IPM Systems

Future Trends and Recommendations

References

Discussion

Potentialities for Pest Management in Potatoes

Resistant Potato Cultivars

Cultural Practices

Biological Control

Legal Regulations

Chemical Pesticides

Conclusions

References

Discussion

Insect Control in Corn—Practices and Prospects

Pests and Control Practices in Corn

Prospects and Strategies for Pest Management in Corn

A Statewide Pest Management Plan for Corn Rootworms in Illinois

Obstacles to Acceptance and Use of Pest Management

References

Discussion

Progress in Integrated Pest Management of Soybean Pests

Introduction

Assessment of Insect Pest Problems of Soybean

Development of a Strategy for Research on Soybean Insect Pests

Major Accomplishments of Recent Research on Soybean Insect Pests

Ecological Studies on Insect Pests, Entomophagous Insects, and Pathogens

Current Status of IPM Systems for Soybean

Problems That Require Immediate Interdisciplinary Research

References

Discussion

Application of Computer Technology to Pest Management

Introduction

Multifactor Control of Insect Pests

Summary and Conclusion

References

Discussion

The Status and Future of Chemical Weed Control

The Objectives of Weed Control

The Alternatives

Weed Ecology

Strategy

Current Trends

Nontillage or Conservation Tillage

Polycrop Cultures

References

Discussion

Pest Control Strategies: Urban Integrated Pest Management

Urban Pesticide Use

Street Tree Pest Management as an Initial Approach

Distinctive Characteristics of Urban IPM

The Injury Level Concept

Spot Treatments

The Need for Delivery System Research

Including Biological Control in IPM Studies

Education

Conclusions

References

Discussion

IV Obstacles and Incentives

Current Status, Urgent Needs, and Future Prospects of Integrated Pest Management

Introduction

Objectives of the IPM Program and Its Approach

The Systems Approach and Modeling

Brief Resume of Some of the Major Accomplishments Not Reported by Other Speakers

Future Prospects and Conclusions

References

Discussion

Policy Coherence through a Redefinition of the Pest Control Problem, or "If You Can't Beat 'Em, Join 'Em"

Introduction

Placing the Pest Control Problem

Defining the Pest Control Problem

Implementing Formulation A—Working with the System

Implementing Formulation B—Changing the System

Recommendations and Conclusion

Discussion

Industry Perspectives on Pest Management

Text

References

Discussion

Barriers to the Diffusion of IPM Programs in Commercial Agriculture

Preconditions to the Diffusion of IPM

Technical Information and Advice in the Field

Marketability and Quality Grade Standards

A Scenario of Regulatory Reform in California

Concluding Remarks

References

Discussion

Integrated Pest Management Needs—Teaching, Research, and Extension

The Hard Realities

Participants in the Drama

Teaching Needs

Research Needs

Extension Needs

References

Index














Details

No. of pages:
350
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 1978
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780323154734

About the Editor

Edward H. Smith