Performance of Bio-based Building Materials - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081009826

Performance of Bio-based Building Materials

1st Edition

Authors: Dennis Jones Christian Brischke
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081009826
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 7th July 2017
Page Count: 646
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Table of Contents

Preface

1 Introduction

This book shall provide guidance on the use of bio based building materials (BBBM) with respect to their performance. The book is focusing on BBBM currently present on the European market.

The state of the art is presented regarding material properties, recommended uses, performance expectancies, testing methodology and related standards. Lacks of information and knowledge will be identified. Future research needs are highlighted. Promising developments that could become commercial in the near future are presented as well.

This does not exclude the majority of ‘old and traditional’ BBBM since quite some of them are experiencing a comeback or have never disappeared from the market.

1.1 Bio-based building materials and their role in the modern building sector

1.2 Traditional use and regional differences

1.3 Current issues and challenges related to performance of bio-based building materials

2 Wood-based bio-based building materials

2.1 Wood based products

This section to cover hardwood and softwood and regional differences depending on local supply How international supplies have changed market demand and building techniques

Each sub-chapter should contain:

General description

Notable properties (related to performance)

Applications (historical and –more important- recent examples)

2.1.1 Solid wood

2.1.2 Glulam and cross laminated timber

2.1.3 Panels

2.1.4 Composites

2.2 Wood Derivatives

2.2.1 Bark

2.2.2 Cork

2.2.3 Fibers

2.2.4 Cellulose

2.2.5 Pulp and paper

3 Non-wood-based bio-based building materials

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Flax

3.3 Hemp

3.4 Straw

3.5 Bamboo and Rattan

3.6 Reed

3.7 Palm

4 Non-conventional and emerging bio-based building materials

4.1 Seaweed

4.2 Wool

4.3 Peat

4.4 Grass

4.5 Other

To be determined as the review progresses, based on innovative work within the COST Action and surveying international literature

4.6 Hybrid materials

Review the development of combination of range of bio-based maeterials as well as bio-based materials in combination with non-biobased construction materials (e.g. hempcrete, composite windows)

5 Protection of bio-based materials

The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of methods available to enhance the properties of bio-based materials. This will only provide a general introduction, since there are a wide range of existing texts on these subjects, and readers will be directed towards these.

5.1 Hazards and potential degrading agents

5.2 Material protection

5.2.1 Preservation techniques

5.2.2 Modification methods

5.2.3 Encapsulation methods

5.3 Building design

5.4 Building maintenance

6 Performance of the bio-based material

Clear description of how ‚performance‘ can be defined and understood. This might be done by considering different viewpoints, e.g. of architects, engineers, end users, academics, biologists, market researcher, etc.

6.1 Function

6.2 Durability

6.3 Moisture

6.4 Aesthetics

6.5 Energy efficiency

6.6 Resistance to fire

Written by an invited guest author from COST FP 1404

6.7 Environmental

6.8 Other

7 Performance requirements as part of the building envelope

7.1 Building physics

7.2 Energy efficiency

7.3 Concept of near zero energy and passive houses

7.4 Impact of in-use conditions

How do people living inside and using the building or constructed asset influence its performance? Effect of ventilation habits, cleaning, maintenance, wear, etc.

7.5 Indoor air quality

Effects of VOC emissions, indoor and outdoor pollutions

8 Performance testing

It is necessary to consider both lab and field tests given the necessity to meet lab testing conditions for traditional standardisation methods used with bio-based materials, and long-term realistic testing according to field trials (which expose materials to real-time hazards, e.g. long term durability studies of CCA treated wood have been running for more than 50 years, so providing wealth of information and helping in comparing/extrapolating lab test results with expected field trials and hence in-use performance)

8.1 Laboratory testing

8.1.1 Bacteria, mould and decay fungi

8.1.2 Insects

8.1.3 Marine borers

8.1.4 Weathering and leaching

8.1.5 Moisture dynamics

8.1.6 Energy performance

8.1.7 Building physics (e.g. moisture transport, thermal conductivity

8.2 Field tests

8.2.1 Bacteria, mould and decay fungi

8.2.2 Insects

8.2.3 Marine borers

8.2.4 Weathering and leaching

8.2.5 Moisture dynamics

8.3 Monitoring of structures and in-service testing

9 Performance of building envelopes

9.1 Building physics

9.2 Energy efficiency

9.3 Concept of near zero energy and passive houses

9.4 Impact of in-use conditions

How do people living inside and using the building or constructed asset influence its performance? Effect of ventilation habits, cleaning, maintenance, wear, etc.

9.5 Indoor air quality

Effects of VOC emissions, indoor and outdoor pollutions

10 Modelling

10.1 Introduction

How modelling can be used as a tool to link testing results to expected service performance and overall service life

10.2 Mould development

10.3 Hygrothermal models

10.4 Decay models

10.5 Thermal and energy efficiency models

10.6 Mechanical performance models

10.7 Others

11 Bio-based building materials meeting current and future requirements

11.1 Introduction

Overview of the demands for improved building performance, and how bio-based materials can help meet these demands now and in the forseeable future.

11.2 Mitigation of climate change and building materials

11.2.1 Environmental assessment of building materials from processing, use and end of life phase

11.2.2 Environmental assessment of buildings

11.2.3 Assessing and managing the risk of climate changes

11.2.4 Health co-benefits of climate change mitigation measures

11.3 Innovative building materials for sustainable growth

11.3.1 Environmental profiles and Eco-labels

11.3.2 Life cycle costing

11.3.3 Circular economy, bio-economy, and low-carbon society

12.4 Future requirements

12 Evaluation and standardisation

12.1 Current situation in Europe

Structured according to ‚performance types as in section 6-5

12.2 Current situation internationally

Structured according to ‚performance types as in section 6-5

12.3 Overview of relevant standards

Structured according to ‚performance types as in section 6-5

12.4 Recent developments

13 Current groups and evaluation committees for bio-based building materials

14 Glossary of terms


Description

Performance of Bio-based Building Materials provides guidance on the use of bio-based building materials (BBBM) with respect to their performance. The book focuses on BBBM currently present on the European market. The state-of-the-art is presented regarding material properties, recommended uses, performance expectancies, testing methodology, and related standards.

Chapters cover both ‘old and traditional’ BBBM since quite a few of them are experiencing a comeback on the market. Promising developments that could become commercial in the near future are presented as well.

The book will be a valuable reference resource for those working in the bio-based materials research community, architects and agencies dealing with sustainable construction, and graduate students in civil engineering.

Key Features

  • Takes a unique approach to bio-based materials and presents a broad overview of the topics on relevant areas necessary for application and promotion in construction
  • Contains a general description, notable properties related to performance, and applications
  • Presents standards that are structured according to performance types

Readership

Graduate students in civil engineering, those working in the bio-based materials research community, architects and agencies dealing with sustainable construction


Details

No. of pages:
646
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081009826

About the Authors

Dennis Jones Author

Dennis Jones, the Chair of COST Action FP1303, has more than 20 years’ experience in wood and bio-based material research and technology. Currently working as a consultant, he is affiliated with Luleå University of Technology in Sweden and the University of Primorska in Slovenia, having previously worked in Sweden, the UK, Denmark and The Netherlands.

Affiliations and Expertise

DJ Timber Consultancy Ltd, UK Luleå University of Technology, Skellefteå, Sweden University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia

Christian Brischke Author

Christian Brischke is the Vice Chair of COST Action FP1303 and is a researcher at University Göttingen in Germany and has a prolific publication list in areas linked to protection and performance of bio-based materials. He is also active within the International Research Group on Wood Protection, where he is currently a committee member for the group “Test Methodology and Assessment” as well as a member of their Communications Committee.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Göttingen, Germany