Description

Gene therapy is gaining recognition as an exciting new therapeutic technique with great potential for the treatment of disease. Gene delivery vehicles, or vectors, based on the adenovirus are emerging as important tools in gene therapy. About one in ten people has, or will develop at some later stage, an inherited genetic disorder, and approximately 2800 specific conditions are known to be caused by defects (mutations) in just one of the patient's genes. To date, gene therapy techniques have not proved as successful in treating these disorders as originally hoped. Making gene therapy a successful endeavor will require careful research to improve traditional approaches and explore new ways to deal with genetic defects. One such innovative technique is the use of retroviruses and adenoviruses to deliver genes to cells without disrupting the cell's chromosomal configuration. Adenoviral Vectors for Gene Therapy provides detailed and comprehensive coverage of these important therapeutic agents. The topics covered in this book range from the basic biology of adenoviruses, through the construction and purification of adenoviral vectors, cutting-edge vectorology and the use of adenoviral vectors in preclinical animal models, to regulatory issues which must be considered prior to the initiation of human clinical gene therapy trials. The broad scope of this unique volume provides the reader with a complete understanding of the development and use of adenoviral vectors.

Details

No. of pages:
890
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2003
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780080525969
Print ISBN:
9780121995041

About the editors

David Curiel

David T. Curiel, M.D., Ph.D. is the Director of the Cancer Biology Division of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Curiel graduated medical school at Emory University in 1982, where he also completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Dr. Curiel’s scientific training includes tenureship at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland at the Pulmonary Branch of the Heart and Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) from 1985-1989, and a fellowship in Biotechnology at the National Cancer Institute, Navy Medical Oncology Branch from 1989-1990. He received his Ph.D. from University of Groningen in The Netherlands in 2002. Dr. Curiel has been at Washington University School of Medicine since 2011. In addition to his role as Director of the Cancer Biology Division, he is Director of the Biologic Therapeutics Center.

Affiliations and Expertise

Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA

David Curiel

David T. Curiel, M.D., Ph.D. is the Director of the Cancer Biology Division of the Department of Radiation Oncology at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Curiel graduated medical school at Emory University in 1982, where he also completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Dr. Curiel’s scientific training includes tenureship at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland at the Pulmonary Branch of the Heart and Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) from 1985-1989, and a fellowship in Biotechnology at the National Cancer Institute, Navy Medical Oncology Branch from 1989-1990. He received his Ph.D. from University of Groningen in The Netherlands in 2002. Dr. Curiel has been at Washington University School of Medicine since 2011. In addition to his role as Director of the Cancer Biology Division, he is Director of the Biologic Therapeutics Center.

Affiliations and Expertise

Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA

Joanne Douglas

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Alabama, Birmingham, U.S.A.

Reviews

"This is a well organized collection of reviews written by authorities in the field that covers key aspects in the use of adenovirus as a gene transfer vehicle. The complete coverage of so many different aspects of adenovirus vector biology will be invaluable to scientists beginning or well established in this rapidly changing field." --DOODY'S (March 2003)