Nanostructures for Drug Delivery

Nanostructures for Drug Delivery

1st Edition - March 24, 2017

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  • Editors: Ecaterina Andronescu, Alexandru Grumezescu
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323461436
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323461498

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Description

Nanostructures for Drug Delivery extensively covers the various nanostructured products that have been tested as carriers in target drug delivery systems. In addition, the book analyses the advantages of, and issues related to, using nanostructured materials in drug delivery systems, also detailing various nanocarrier preparation techniques. As delivering the drug to the target site is a major problem in providing effective treatment for many diseases, this book covers the latest advancements in numerous nanotechnological products that are being used in disease detection, controlled drug delivery, as biosensors, and in tissue engineering that have been developed for more efficient patient healthcare. Due to the versatility of nanostructured materials, it is now possible to deliver a drug at its target site in a more accurate and efficient way. This volume is an up-to-date, state-of-the-art work that highlights the principal mechanistic aspects related to the delivery of active nanoscale therapeutic agents (natural or synthetic) and their release profile in different environmental media. It highlights nanoscale encapsulation strategies and discusses both organic and inorganic nanomaterials as carriers and delivery platforms.

Key Features

  • Demonstrates how nanostructures are successfully employed in drug delivery stems and as drug delivery agents, allowing biomaterials scientists and biochemists to create more effective drug delivery systems
  • Offers an overview of recent research into the use of nanostructures in drug delivery techniques in a cogent, synthesized way, allowing readers to quickly familiarize themselves with this area
  • Includes examples of how the application of nanostructures have improved the efficiency of drug delivery systems, showing medical scientists how they are beneficial

Readership

Biomaterials scientists, materials scientists, biomedical engineers, medicinal chemists and postgraduate students specializing in the areas of nanomedicine, bionanomaterials and nanotechnology applications in healthcare

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Therapeutic nanomaterials: from a drug delivery perspective
    C. Ganesh Kumar

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. General Methods of Synthesis of Nanomaterials
    • 3. Characterization of Nanomaterials
    • 4. Applications of Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery
    • 5. Conclusions

    Chapter 2: Core–shell drug carriers: liposomes, polymersomes, and niosomes
    Nily Dan

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Self-Assembled Bilayers
    • 3. Liposomes as Drug Carriers
    • 4. Polymersomes as Drug Carriers
    • 5. Niosomes as Drug Carriers
    • 6. Biomedical Applications of Core–Shell Vesicular Drug Carriers
    • 7. Discussion
    • 8. Conclusions
    • Conflict of Interests

    Chapter 3: The new nanocarriers based on graphene and graphene oxide for drug delivery applications
    Mehrdad Hamidi

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Chemistry of the Graphene Surface
    • 3. Modification of Graphene Surface for Drug Delivery Applications
    • 4. In Vitro Toxicology and Biosafety of Graphene Derivative
    • 5. Conclusions

    Chapter 4: Nanostructured nanoparticles for improved drug delivery
    Xavier Banquy

    • Abstract
    • Abbreviations
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. The Core–Shell Nanostructure
    • 3. The Capsule and Vesicle Nanostructure
    • 4. Multicompartment Nanoparticles
    • 5. Conclusions and Perspectives
    • Acknowledgments

    Chapter 5: Design of functionalized materials for use in micronanoscale drug delivery devices and smart patches
    James Davis and Ashleigh Anderson

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Traditional Approaches to Drug Delivery
    • 3. Compliance
    • 4. Evolution of Smart Drug Delivery Devices
    • 5. Electrochemical Approaches to Drug Release
    • 6. Innovation and Application
    • 7. Conclusions

    Chapter 6: Niosomes: a novel approach in modern drug delivery systems
    Sepideh Khoee

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Factors Affecting the Formation of Niosomes
    • 3. Types of Niosomes
    • 4. Niosome Preparation
    • 5. Characterization
    • 6. Advantages of Niosomes
    • 7. Limitation of Niosomal Drug Delivery System
    • 8. Comparison of Niosomes Versus Liposomes
    • 9. In-Vivo Behavior of Niosomes
    • 10. Pharmaceutical Applications and Administration of Niosomes
    • 11. Final Consideration and Outlook

    Chapter 7: Nanofibrous and nanoparticle materials as drug-delivery systems
    Masoud Latifi

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Nanoparticle Materials in Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 3. Nanofibrous Materials as Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 4. Future Directions

    Chapter 8: Brush polymer-based nanostructures for drug delivery
    Chong Cheng

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Structural Design of BP-Based Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 3. BP-Based Encapsulated Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 4. BP-Based Conjugated Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 5. Multifunctional BP-Based Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 6. Summary
    • Acknowledgments

    Chapter 9: Drug delivery systems based on titania nanostructures
    Grzegorz D. Sulka

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Nanostructured TiO2 Used for Drug Delivery Systems
    • 3. Drug Loading
    • 4. Drug Release
    • 5. Functionalization of TiO2 Nanostructures
    • 6. Other Types of Nanostructured TiO2 Used as Drug Delivery Systems
    • 7. Conclusions

    Chapter 10: Redox activated polymeric nanoparticles in tumor therapy
    Khaled Greish

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Reactive Chemical Species in Human Physiology
    • 3. Origins of Enhanced Free Radical Production in Tumors
    • 4. Active and Passive Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 5. Redox Responsive Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 6. Miscellaneous Systems
    • 7. Conclusions

    Chapter 11: Polymeric micro- and nanoparticles for controlled and targeted drug delivery
    Magdalena Stevanovic

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Polymeric Micro- and Nanoparticles for a Controlled Delivery of Active Substances
    • 3. Formulation of Micro- and Nanopolymer Particles
    • 4. The Most Widely Used Incorporation Techniques
    • 5. Characteristics of Polymeric Micro- and Nanoparticles With an Encapsulated Vitamin as an Active Substance and Their Comparison
    • 6. Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments

    Chapter 12: Novel gels: implications for drug delivery
    Swarnali Das Paul

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Hydrogels
    • 3. In situ Gel
    • 4. Emulsion Gels
    • 5. Microgel
    • 6. Nanogels
    • 7. Vesicular Gel
    • 8. Future Prospects

    Chapter 13: Nanosuspension drug delivery system: preparation, characterization, postproduction processing, dosage form, and application
    Jian Zhong

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Preparation of Liquid Nanosuspension DDS
    • 3. Characterization of Nanosuspension DDS
    • 4. Postproduction Processing
    • 5. Dosage Form of Nanosuspension DDS
    • 6. Application of Nanosuspension DDS
    • 7. Summary and Outlook
    • Acknowledgments

    Chapter 14: Polymer-based nanocarriers for therapeutic nucleic acids delivery
    Weien Yuan

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Current Challenges and Barriers for Therapeutic Nucleic Acids Delivery
    • 3. Advantages and Uniqueness of Polymer-Based Nanocarriers for Addressing Existing Challenges and Barriers
    • 4. Recent Examples of Polymer-Based Nanocarriers for Therapeutic Nucleic-Acids Delivery
    • 5. Other Considerations for Polymer-Based Nanocarriers for Therapeutic Nucleic Acids Delivery
    • 6. Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments

    Chapter 15: Multifunctional therapeutic hybrid nanocarriers for targeted and triggered drug delivery: recent trends and future prospects
    Gokcen Birlik Demirel

    • Abstract
    • Abbreviations
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Metal Nanoparticles
    • 3. Silica Nanoparticles
    • 4. Polymeric Nanoparticles
    • 5. Core/Shell Nanoparticles
    • 6. Conclusion and Future Prospects

    Chapter 16: Lipid-based nanocarriers for ocular drug delivery
    Ragwa Mohamed Farid

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Routes of Delivery (Thakur and Kashiv, 2011)
    • 3. Major Physiological Barriers of the Eye to Topical Ocular Drug Delivery
    • 4. Requisites of Controlled Ocular Delivery (Wilson, 2004)
    • 5. Lipid-Based Nanocarriers as Topical Ocular Delivery Systems (Gan et al., 2013)
    • 6. Conclusions

    Chapter 17: Nanoparticulate carrier(s): an emerging paradigm in new generation vaccine development
    Suresh P. Vyas

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Advantages of Nanoparticulate-based Vaccine Delivery
    • 3. Generation of Immune Response
    • 4. Design Aspects in the New Generation of Vaccine Development
    • 5. Nanocarrier(s) Properties that Make Suitable Cargo for Vaccine Delivery
    • 6. Nanoparticulate Carriers as a Versatile Platform for Vaccine Delivery
    • 7. New Generation Vaccines
    • 8. Conclusions

    Chapter 18: Pathogen-specific nucleic acid aptamers as targeting components of antibiotic and gene delivery systems
    Serap Evran

    • Abstract
    • 1. SELEX for Selection of Specific and High-Affinity Aptamers
    • 2. Aptamers for Pathogenic Cells
    • 3. Nanoparticle-Based Antimicrobial Gene Delivery
    • 4. Functionalization of Nanocarriers
    • 5. Conclusions and Future Perspectives

    Chapter 19: Multifunctional nanosized emulsions for theragnosis of life threatening diseases
    Tamilvanan Shunmugaperumal

    • Abstract
    • Abbreviations
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. O/W-Type Nanosized Emulsions (NE) Generations
    • 3. Future Perspectives
    • 4. Conclusions

    Chapter 20: Therapeutic nanostructures for pulmonary drug delivery
    Yousef Javadzadeh

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Nanoparticles
    • 3. Pulmonary Drug Delivery
    • 4. Drugs Suitable for Pulmonary Drug Delivery
    • 5. Nanostructures for Drug Delivery to the Lungs
    • 6. Pulmonary Delivery Devices
    • 7. Deposition of Inhaled Particles in Respiratory Tract
    • 8. Fate of Inhaled Particles
    • 9. Evaluation of the Fate of Inhaled Particles
    • 10. Conclusions

    Chapter 21: Nanostructures in transdermal drug delivery systems
    Gul Majid Khan and Naveed Ahmed

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Skin Anatomy
    • 3. Permeation Pathways Across Skin
    • 4. Advantages of Transdermal Drug Delivery Compared to Other Routes of Administration
    • 5. Advantages of Nanostructures in TDDS
    • 6. Physicochemical Properties of Nanostructures Required for Good Permeation
    • 7. Types of Nanostructures Used in TDDS
    • 8. Limitations of Nanostructures in TDDS
    • 9. Applications of Nanostructures in TDDS
    • 10. Conclusions and Future Perspectives

    Chapter 22: Advancement in pulmonary drug delivery systems for treatment of tuberculosis
    Amit Kumar Goyal

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Burden of Disease and Progress Toward Global Targets
    • 3. Pathogenesis of Tuberculosis
    • 4. Current Antitubercular Chemotherapy
    • 5. Pulmonary Drug Delivery
    • 6. Advanced Dry Powder Inhalers (DPI)
    • 7. Carriers Used for Pulmonary Delivery of ATDs
    • 8. Conclusions and Future Prospectives
    • Acknowledgment

    Chapter 23: Nanosized devices as antibiotics and antifungals delivery: past, news, and outlook
    Rosario Pignatello

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Liposomes
    • 3. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN)
    • 4. Mucoadhesive Drug Delivery Systems
    • 5. Chemical Drug Delivery Systems
    • 6. Conclusions and Future Outlooks

    Chapter 24: Drug delivery mediated by confined nanosystems: structure-activity relations and factors responsible for the efficacy of formulations
    Lucia Zakharova

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Surfactant-Based Formulations; Structure-Activity Relations as Criteria for the Choice of Building Blocks
    • 3. Cationic Surfactants as Agents for DNA Transfection
    • 4. Binding/Release Properties of Self-Assembled Systems
    • 5. Biomaterials for Hydrophilic Peptides
    • 6. Penetration Through BBB
    • 7. Conclusions
    • Acknowledgment

    Chapter 25: Therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies: general aspects and challenges for drug delivery
    Santiago Daniel Palma

    • Abstract
    • 1. General Introduction
    • 2. Mabs Production
    • 3. Antibody–Drug Conjugates
    • 4. Nanotechnology’s Potential Impact on Mabs
    • 5. Therapeutic Applications of Monoclonal Antibodies
    • 6. Future Trends of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Chapter 26: Targeted drug delivery via chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles
    Gozde Unsoy

    • Abstract
    • 1. Nanotechnology-Based Targeted Drug-Delivery Systems
    • 2. Targeting Strategies in Drug Delivery
    • 3. Magnetic Nanoparticles
    • 4. Chitosan as a Surface Coating Material for Magnetic Nanoparticles
    • 5. Synthesis Methods for Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles
    • 6. Magnetically Targeted Drug Delivery via Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles
    • 7. Cellular Internalization of Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles
    • 8. Drug Release From Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles
    • 9. Toxicity of Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles
    • 10. Administration Routes of Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles
    • 11. Concluding Remarks

    Chapter 27: Drug delivery: advancements and challenges
    Gaurav Verma

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Drug Delivery into the Brain
    • 3. Oral Drug Delivery Systems
    • 4. Targeted Drug Delivery
    • 5. Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery
    • 6. Modern Drug Delivery: Challenges
    • 7. Conclusions

    Chapter 28: Stimuli-responsive liposome and control release drug
    Xue Qin An

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Liposomes
    • 3. Stimuli-Responsive Liposome
    • 4. Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments

    Chapter 29: Nanotechnology to enhance transdermal delivery of hydrophilic humectants for improved skin care: a model for therapeutic applications
    Marek K. Dobke

    • Abstract
    • 1. Basic Concepts
    • 2. Transdermal Agents Delivery and Nanotechnology
    • 3. Humectants for Improved Skin Care: A Model for Therapeutic Applications
    • 4. Conclusions and Lessons From Humectants for Skin Care Modeling Therapeutic Applications of Nanotechnologies

    Chapter 30: Nanostructures for drug delivery: pharmacokinetic and toxicological aspects
    Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu

    • Abstract
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Nanoparticles and Drug Delivery
    • 3. Main Applications
    • 4. Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Nanoparticles in Drug Delivery Systems
    • 5. Toxicological Effects of Nanoparticles
    • 6. Determination of Toxicity
    • 7. Toxicity
    • 8. Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments

Product details

  • No. of pages: 1024
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2017
  • Published: March 24, 2017
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323461436
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323461498

About the Editors

Ecaterina Andronescu

Ecaterina Andronescu is Professor at UPB, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Material Science, Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, University Politehnica, Romania. He has been the coordinator for more than 80 research projects with national and international funding and author of more than 330 papers (more than 150 in lSI-ranked journals). Her specific fields of interest are biomaterials, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies; anti-microbial anti-biofilm, and drug delivery systems. Prof. Andronescu has received several honorary titles, including Doctor Honoris Causa – from several universities. She is a member of the Register of Assessors of ARACIS, Commission for Chemistry and Materials Science Founder and President of the Romanian Society of Materials; Founder of the Romanian Society of Biomaterials; Founder and member of the Romanian Society of Ceramics; Founder of the Romanian Society of Chemistry; and Member of the European Society of Ceramics.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor at UPB, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Material Science, Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, University Politehnica, Romania

Alexandru Grumezescu

Dr. Grumezescu is Assistant Professor at the Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, in the Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, with a second affiliation to the Faculty of Medical Engineering, at the Politehnica University of Bucharest in Romania. He is an experienced and oft-published researcher and editor in the field of nano and biomaterials, and he is the Editor-in-Chief of three journals: Biointerface Research in Applied Chemistry, Letters and Applied NanoBioScience, and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Bulletin. He also serves as editor or guest editor for several notable journals. Dr. Grumezescu has published 150 peer-reviewed papers, 20 book chapters, 6 co-authored books and 11 edited books.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science and Faculty of Medical Engineering, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania

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